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Overview

Kidney Transplant: Treatment, Procedure, Cost and Side Effects

What is the treatment?

The kidneys are a pair of organs that are in the shape of two beans. Kidneys can be found in the human body in the lower back area. Toxic wastes are eliminated from the body by the kidneys when you are urinating. A person is diagnosed with kidney failure when his/her kidneys cannot remove the toxic wastes from the body like it used to.

Over time various health issues keep damaging your kidneys to a point where they stop working. The reasons that harm the kidney slowly are acute infections or illnesses, extreme dehydration and long-standing exposure to environmental pollutants. Other factors responsible for kidney damage are urinary tract infections, nephrotic syndrome, genetic disorders, heart diseases, autoimmune diseases, an infection such as sepsis, diabetes and hypertension or heartburn.

Symptoms of kidney failure do not show all of a sudden. It is a process much like slow poisoning where these organs are damaged a little every day. Therefore, you will only experience the symptoms when the kidneys are failing. The common signs of the body to indicate this will be itchy sensations, reduced appetite, shortness of breath, difficulty sleeping at night, muscle aches, and inflammation in the limbs. In very severe cases if your kidneys suffer acute failure then you will experience diarrhoea, bleeding, vomiting, back pain, fever and skin rash.

How is the treatment done?

kidney transplantation is generally prescribed to patients who are in the last stage of their chronic kidney failure problem. Kidney transplantation is dependent on a donor. This can either be a dead or living person. When the kidney is gathered from a dead person it is called a deceased donor kidney and when it comes from a living person (usually it comes from a family member) it is called a living donor kidney. In case of the former, only healthy people are allowed to donate their kidneys and they need to be fully aware of the transplantation rules. In case of the latter, the kidney comes from a person who has passed away because of brain death.

Before the surgery begins, blood tests need to be run in order to match the blood type recipient and donor kidney. Next a tissue typing test is run to match the tissue type. Then tests are carried out on the donor to check if he/she has any viruses such as hepatitis, CMV or HIV.

After passing all these tests the patient undergoes surgery in the next stage. The surgery is performed under the administration of general anaesthesia and goes on for about 3 hours. The transplanted kidneys are placed in a location which is different to the location of the existing ones. This is called heterotopic transplantation. Usually the original kidneys will only be removed if they are extreme troubles such as infections or very blood pressure. The artery is surgically connected to the kidney.

Who is eligible for the treatment? (When is the treatment done?)

People who are in the last stage of Chronic kidney damage are eligible for treatment.

Who is not eligible for the treatment?

People who do not pass in any one of the tests conducted prior to the surgery are not-eligible for this treatment.

Also, people who have had a recent case of cancer, cardiovascular disorders, liver disease or severe infections such as bone infection or hepatitis are should not opt for this surgery treatment.

Are there any side effects?

During the course of your kidney transplantation you may be given certain immunosuppressant to stop the body from rejecting the donated organ. These immunosuppressants could cause long-term side effects such as higher chances of infections, diarrhoea, excessive hair growth or hair fall, bleeding, swelling, abdominal cramps, acne, mood swings, anemia, arthritis, seizures, susceptibility to diabetes, risk of cancers and weight gain.

What are the post-treatment guidelines?

As a follow up to the transplantation surgery the patient will be kept under strict monitoring to see if he/she is experiencing kidney rejection or any infection. For this reason the patients will be asked to take various anti-rejection medications in order to prohibit the body to reject the donated kidney and also ensure proper functioning of the transplanted kidneys.

How long does it take to recover?

After the transplantation surgery a person is usually held back in the hospital for about a week to notice any signs of infections or rejection on the part of the body.

After this the patient will be further asked to take rest for about 1-2 months during which time he cannot do any form of rigorous exercises or lift objects that are heavy in weight.

What is the price of the treatment in India?

Kidney transplant surgeries in India cost around 2-3 lakhs approximately and the anti-rejection medications prescribed by the doctor will cost you around 300 to 3000 rupees.

Are the results of the treatment permanent?

Although the success rate of kidney transplantation surgeries are high, there are a few cases where a transplant can fail and not have permanent results. The reasons are formation of blood clots, the formation of an infection in the kidney, certain problems with the donated organ, rejection of the new kidney (this can be either acute or chronic). S, you can see that the results of the treatment are not always permanent.

What are the alternatives to the treatment?

The alternatives for kidney transplant surgery are haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis or conservative management treatment.

Safety: Low Effectiveness: Medium Timeliness: Medium Relative Risk: Low Side Effects: High Time For Recovery: Medium Price Range:

Rs. 300- Rs. 3, 00000

Popular Health Tips

What's It Like to Live With One Kidney?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB - Urology/Genito - Urinary Surgery
Urologist, Bhopal
What's It Like to Live With One Kidney?

One single kidney in place of two is a scenario which is often termed as solitary kidney.

Who has a solitary kidney?

  1. Their body functions normally and are generally not unhealthy. This is also known as renal agenesis.
  2. In some cases, people are born with two kidneys with just one of them healthy and fully functional. The other one does not function fully or partially. This condition is known as kidney dysplasia.
  3. A person who had to undergo a kidney removal surgery (nephrectomy); such a surgery is conducted when a person has an infected kidney or diseased, malfunctioning/cancerous growths on the kidney.
  4. A person who has donated a kidney to someone who required kidney transplantation.

What potential health risks does a person with a solitary kidney have?

  1. Normally, a person born with a single kidney does not have any such potential health risks. They are generally healthy and lead normal lives.
  2. Later in life, there may or may not be slight loss or degradation in the functioning of the kidney.
  3. The life span of a person with a single kidney is normal. There is no apparent effect on the mortality rates.

What kind of special diet must a person with a single kidney follow?

  1. There is no need of any such special diet for a person with a single kidney.
  2. Normal healthy balanced diet with all the essential nutrients should suffice.
  3. You must be careful about your animal protein intake and calcium supplements.
  4. Drink sufficient quantity of water to remain hydrated all day and prevent the urine from turning acidic.
  5. Controlled consumption of alcohol and caffeine is a must. It is also important to reduce the consumption of aerated drinks.

Exercises and Physical activities for a person with a single kidney:

  1. A person with a solitary kidney can function like any other normal individual.
  2. You may also participate in sports. However, you must take enough precaution to prevent injuries to your kidney. Proper padding and protection around your lower abdominal region and back is of utmost necessity.
  3. You can hit the gym, run a marathon and nothing is impossible for you.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3159 people found this helpful

Dialysis - Why It Is Required?

DM - Nephrology, DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Dialysis - Why It Is Required?

Kidneys are a pair of organs that are located on either side of the spine, each about a size of a fist. The kidneys help in purifying blood by removing toxins, waste materials and excess fluids from the human body. Disorders and dysfunctions of the kidney can lead to severe and often fatal consequences. When the kidneys stop functioning as they are supposed to, dialysis is performed to resume normal functioning in the body.

Dialysis is a type of treatment, which filters and purifies the blood with the aid of a machine. It is an artificial way of purifying blood. There are two types of dialysis, namely hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis, the most common form of dialysis, which involves using a manmade kidney called a hemodialyzer, which removes toxins and waste materials from blood.

Peritoneal Dialysis, on the other hand, is a type of treatment which involves implanting a catheter in the stomach. During the procedure, a fluid called dialysate flows into the abdomen that absorbs all the waste material, which is consequently drained out of the body.

You may need a dialysis if:

  1. Your kidneys are dysfunctional
  2. When waste materials and toxins start to accumulate in the body
  3. In an event of an injury or accident to the kidney such as internal lacerations (wound caused by the tearing of a tissue)
  4. If the creatinine (a type of a chemical waste product) level falls to 10-12 cc/minute
  5. In an event where the kidneys aren't able to work properly leading to accumulation of toxins, irregular amounts of chemicals in the body and other dysfunctions


Weakening of the abdominal muscles and weight gain are some of the risks involved in dialysis. Dialysis is a temporary treatment and serves to function till the time the actual kidneys get repaired. In chronic cases of kidney disease, kidney transplant may perhaps be the last resort.
 

How Alonzo Won NBA Title Even After A Kidney Transplant?

DM - Nephrology, MD - Medicine
Nephrologist, Coimbatore
  • In 2000, Alonzo Mourning was on top of the world: He had a fat new NBA contract, an Olympic gold medal, and a second beautiful child–plus the fame and wealth he had earned playing the game he loved. But in September of that year he was diagnosed with a rare and fatal kidney disease. Over the next couple of years, as his health faltered, he retired, unretired, and retired again–and sought to make sense of what remained of his life. Finally in 2003, after a frantic search for a donor match, Mourning had a new kidney and a new outlook. He vowed to make this second chance count by dedicating his life to others.
  • By sharing his experiences of the chasms and peaks of illness and recovery, Mourning delivers a message of faith and fire, trust and triumph. 
1 person found this helpful

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease!

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, FACE, FACP, FRCP (London)
Diabetologist, Lucknow
Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease!

At the point when our bodies process the protein we eat, the procedure creates waste products. In the kidneys, millions of tiny blood vessels act as filters since they have even tinier holes in them. As blood flows through these vessels, little molecules such as waste items may press through the gaps. These waste items turn out to be a part of the urine. Helpful substances such as protein and red blood cells are too enormous to go through the gaps in the filter and stay in the blood.

Diabetes and kidneys: Diabetes can harm the kidneys. Abnormal amount of glucose make the kidneys filter a lot of blood. After a couple of years, they begin to spill and helpful protein is thereby lost in urine. Having low protein levels in the urine is called micro albuminuria.

Medication: When kidney disease is analyzed on time, during micro albuminuria, a few medications may keep kidney disease from getting worse. Having elevated levels of protein in the urine is called macro albuminuria. When kidney disease is looked up some other time during macro albuminuria, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually follows.

Causes: Strain on the organs may cause the kidneys to lose their filtering capacity. Waste items then begin to develop in the blood. Finally, the kidneys start to fail. This failure, ESRD, is intense. A patient with ESRD needs a kidney transplant or a blood filtration by a machine (dialysis).

Other complications: Individuals with diabetes will probably have other kidney-related issues such as bladder infections and nerve damages in the bladder.

Preventing complications: Not everybody with diabetes goes through a kidney disease. Elements that can impact kidney disease improvement include genetics, blood sugar control and blood pressure. The more a person keeps diabetes and blood pressure under control, the lower the chances of getting a kidney disease.

Keeping your glucose levels high can counteract diabetic kidney problems. Research has demonstrated that blood glucose control diminishes the danger of micro albuminuria by 33%. For individuals who suffer from micro albuminuria have now a reduced danger of advancing to macro albuminuria. Different studies have recommended that blood glucose control can reverse micro albuminuria.

Treatment: Essential treatments for kidney infection include control of blood glucose and blood pressure. Blood pressure dramatically affects the rate at which the condition progresses. Indeed, even a gentle increase in blood pressure can rapidly aggravate a kidney infection. Four approaches to bring down your blood pressure are:

  1. Shedding pounds
  2. Eating less salt
  3. Maintaining a strategic distance from liquor and tobacco
  4. Exercising regularly

A low-protein diet can decrease the amount of lost protein in the urine and increase the protein levels in the blood. Never begin a low-protein diet without talking to your physician. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4324 people found this helpful

Renal Transplant - What Should You Know About It?

MCh Urology, DNB Urology, MS-General Surgery, MBBS, Diploma In Laproscopy & Urology, Basic & Advance Robotic Urology Training
Urologist, Delhi
Renal Transplant - What Should You Know About It?

The kidneys are primarily responsible for filtering blood and removing waste from the body. They also regulate the fluid and electrolyte balance. If the kidneys stop functioning, a patient may need to undergo dialysis or have a renal transplant. Many patients prefer undergoing a transplant as it offers a better quality of life in the long run.

A kidney transplant can be described as a procedure to replace one’s own kidneys with a donor's kidney. In case of kidney transplant, there are two types of donors. The human body can function with one healthy kidney and hence family members and friends of the patient may choose to donate a kidney. Else, a kidney may be sourced from recently deceased donors who have chosen to donate their organs after death. In both cases, it is important that the donor kidney match the patient’s blood and tissue type.

A renal transplant surgery usually takes about 3 hours. The donor kidney is placed in the abdominal cavity and connected to the patient’s arteries, veins and bladder. Usually, the donor kidney begins functioning immediately. The patient’s own damaged or diseased kidneys may not be removed unless there is a severe infection, cancer or a diagnosis of large polycystic kidneys.

The patient will need to be hospitalized for a few days after the surgery. In some cases, dialysis may be needed if the kidneys are unable to produce urine. In addition diuretics and other medication may be needed to remove excess water and salt from the body. Medication will also be prescribed to suppress the immune system so that the patient’s body does not reject the donor kidney. These medications typically need to be taken for the rest of the patient’s life.

A renal transplant is considered a relatively safe procedure. Less than 20 out of 100 people reject a donor kidney. However, there are a few other risks involved. These include:
• Bleeding
• Severe infection
• Failure of the donor kidney
• Reaction to anesthesia
• Increased risk of infections due to suppressed immune system

Kidney transplant is not advised for people suffering from diseases such as cancer or any significant lung or heart disease. If the patient is suffering from an infection, he or she may be advised to wait until the infection subsides before undergoing a renal transplant. A renal transplant may seem to be an expensive procedure but in the long run, this can work out to be more budget friendly than dialysis. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2930 people found this helpful

Popular Questions & Answers

My kidney transplant done last 1.5 years now am all right today I do a mistake I am take panimun dose 2 hours earlier what I do know.

MS - General Surgery, FMAS.Laparoscopy
General Surgeon, Gandhinagar
Hello dear Lybrate user, hi Warm welcome to Lybrate.com I have evaluated your query thoroughly. Nothing goes wrong by single dose alteration of sometime Hope this clears your query. Wishing you fine recovery. Welcome for any further assistance at my private URL https://www.Lybrate.com/gandhinagar/doctor/dr-bhagyesh-patel-general-surgeon Regards take care.

I had a renal Transplant since 17 years, where my levels are 1. 3 for all these years. Now from dec 2017, I have got BK virus +ve with a viral load of 1840 copies/ml. Now Creatinine Levels is 4.4, biopsy results shows mild tubular atrophy & intestinal Fibrosis. Is this can be treated in allopathy.

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Nephrology
Nephrologist, Delhi
Hello... BK virus can cause renal dysfunction in post transplant patients. However, from your biopsy finding it is not very clear whther those findings are due to the virus or the Immunosuppressant medications which you are taking. The best approach would be to taper your immunosuppressant medications and regularly monitor the bk virus level to see for response
5 people found this helpful

I have a query regarding the kidney transplant. If an individual has AB+ blood type, which other blood group will be the match for him for the transplant. Also, what other factors apart from blood type does kidney transplant is based on. Kindly revert me as soon as possible.

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Nephrology
Nephrologist, Delhi
AB blood group can accept kidney from any blood type. There are a number of investigations which need to be done apart from blood group to assess the fitness of recipient and donor.
1 person found this helpful

My eldest Brother has been facing difficult time since the beginning of the year 2018 when he realized that he was suffering from complete kidney failure (Renal Failure with creatinine more than 10.9) He is on a regular dialysis (twice a week). In order to survive, Nephrologist of Nemcare hospital, Guwahati advised him Kidney transplantation. Can anyone please provide actual cost of Kidney Transplant if donor is un-related.

MS - General Surgery, FMAS.Laparoscopy
General Surgeon, Gandhinagar
Hello dear Lybrate user, Warm welcome to Lybrate.com I have evaluated your query thoroughly. The cost of kidney transplant depends upon the center where you are getting operated In Gujarat, Institute of Kidney Disease, civil hospital ahmedabad is the pioneer in kidney transplant in whole India. You can consult HOD Dr. HL Trivedi for further details sir Hope this clears your query. Wishing you fine recovery. Welcome for any further assistance at my private URL https://www.Lybrate.com/gandhinagar/doctor/dr-bhagyesh-patel-general-surgeon Regards take care.
2 people found this helpful

Am having creatinine 1.2 Glomerular filtration rate 66 and albumin 4.9. Am I at risk? What treatment should I take?

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
You are at risk and Few tips on Diet for kidney disease - have a low protein diet (decrease in milk and its products and also decrease in the intake of pulses and nuts etc)- can use corn oil, sunflower oil, olive oil for cooking -decrease the intake of butter, ghee, cream,coconut etc - avoid farsan food items - whole grain cereals are best for carbohydrate intake - get your blood checked for electrolyte levels regularly and adjust salt in diet as per the report values.
1 person found this helpful

Table of Content

What is the treatment?
How is the treatment done?
Who is eligible for the treatment? (When is the treatment done?)
Who is not eligible for the treatment?
Are there any side effects?
What are the post-treatment guidelines?
How long does it take to recover?
What is the price of the treatment in India?
Are the results of the treatment permanent?
What are the alternatives to the treatment?
Having issues? Consult a doctor for medical advice