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Overview

Benefits of Spelt And Its Side Effects

The health benefits of Spelt is such that it helps in improving the digestive health, lowers the level of cholesterol, improves blood circulation, helps in hormonal regulation and creation, maintains bone health, helps in growth and development, helps in maintaining a healthy immune system, controls diabetes, helps patients with migraine headache, helps in preventing atherosclerosis & cardiovascular diseases, prevents development of gallstones and prevents breast cancer.

Benefits of Spelt And Its Side Effects

Table of Content

Spelt
Nutritional Value of Spelt
Health Benefits of Spelt
Helps in improving the digestive health
Helps in lowering the level of cholesterol
Helps in improving blood circulation
Helps in hormonal regulation and creation
Helps in maintaining bone health
Helps in growth and development
Helps in maintaining a healthy immune system
Helps in diabetes control
Helps patients with migraine headache
Helps in preventing atherosclerosis & cardiovascular diseases
Helps in preventing formation of gallstones
Prevents breast cancer
Uses of Spelt
Side-Effects & Allergies of Spelt
Cultivation of Spelt

Spelt

Spelt is a variety of grain or cereal that is closely related to wheat. In fact, spelt likely developed from a hybridization of emmer wheat and wild goat-grass. It is closely related to normal “bread” wheat, but the popularity of bread wheat soon made spelt obsolete, which is why it is considered as a “relict” crop. However, it is making a comeback as a health food, particularly in Spain, the United Kingdom, and other parts of Europe. It is actually packed with nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and essential organic compounds that other cereals and forms of wheat don’t contain, which might explain the renewed interest in spelt. The scientific name of this ancient food staple is Triticum spelta, but it is more commonly known as hulled wheat or dinkel wheat.

Nutritional Value of Spelt

One cup of cooked spelt flour has about 246 calories of energy, 2 grams of fat, zero cholesterol, 10 milligrams of sodium, 51 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of dietary fibre, 11 grams of protein, 5 milligrams of niacin, 0.2 milligrams of thiamine, 0.2 milligrams of vitamin B6, 25 micrograms of folate, 0.5 milligrams of vitamin E, 2.1 milligrams of manganese, 291 milligrams of phosphorus, 95 milligrams of magnesium, 0.4 milligrams of copper, 3 milligrams of iron, 2 milligrams of zinc, 8 micrograms of selenium, 277 milligrams of potassium and 19 milligrams calcium.

Health Benefits of Spelt

Mentioned below are the best health benefits of Spelt
Health Benefits of Spelt

Helps in improving the digestive health

The very high-content of fibre in spelt implies that it facilitates healthy digestion in a major way. Dietary fibre helps to bulk up the stool and move food from the digestive system, accelerating the absorption of nutrition and assists to control situations like constipation, bloating, cramping, excessive gas, diarrhoea and much more severe intestinal issues just like ulcers. Spelt has the greatest dietary fibre contents than the other wheat varieties.

Helps in lowering the level of cholesterol

Dietary fibre features another important role within the body, which is to assist decrease in the amount of dangerous cholesterol within the body. Dietary fibre can communicate with the cholesterol uptake processes as well as prevent the absorption of cholesterol from food. In reality, it may specifically target LDL cholesterol and also eliminate it from the body to manage a healthy balance of fatty acids within the body.

Helps in improving blood circulation

The high amounts of iron and copper in spelt mix to considerably boost circulation of blood. Iron and copper are crucial in order to obtain red blood cells, and when RBC production is up, there is certainly increased blood circulation through the entire body, which suggests additional oxygenation to organs and tissues, increased healing, boosted energy levels, along with a more functional metabolism. Increased circulation may even enhance hair growth and the iron content on the other hand helps the body prevent becoming anaemic.

Helps in hormonal regulation and creation

Niacin is among the important vitamins that can be found in considerable amounts in spelt. Niacin performs a vital role in the adrenal glands within the body, especially in the manufacture of sex hormones. The endocrine system is really a delicate and hugely important factor for our health and general functioning, therefore maintaining healthy niacin levels with the addition of spelt in a person’s diet is highly recommendable.

Helps in maintaining bone health

Spelt comes with a remarkable range of important minerals which are essential for bone health. This includes zinc, magnesium, copper, phosphorous, and selenium. These types of minerals contribute to the formation of bone tissue and also by enhancing the levels of these minerals within the body, it is possible to actively avoid osteoporosis along with other age-related problems that weaken or degrade the bones within the body.

Helps in growth and development

The high amounts of phosphorous, combined with remarkable content of protein in spelt makes it extremely important for the development and growth of new tissues, blood vessels, muscles, bones, and organs. Phosphorous is among the important elements behind creating new proteins as well as making DNA to create new cells. The proteins which are received straight from spelt could be broken down into their composite amino acids and after that can be re-formed for use within the body for pretty much every essential body processes.

Helps in maintaining a healthy immune system

Thiamine is recognized to considerably enhance body’s immune system as well as stimulate its defensive mechanisms, whilst reducing psychological anxiety and stress. Spelt is probably the few cereals that may contain a substantial level of the vitamin-B.

Helps in diabetes control

Even though simple sugars and carbohydrates are recognized to be hazardous for diabetic patients, the high fibre content in spelt can combat the effects of diabetes and help to manage the release as well as the breakdown of simple sugars into glucose. By controlling the release of insulin and glucose within the body, it helps to manage diabetes for individuals who already have problems with the condition, or even prevent more people from developing it.

Helps patients with migraine headache

Consuming foods along with Riboflavin like spelt and other products of spelt is shown to decrease the regularity of migraine attacks. Consuming as little as two ounces of bread or any other baked good made out of whole grain spelt will gives about 76.5% of the daily requirement for Riboflavin.

Helps in preventing atherosclerosis & cardiovascular diseases

Atherosclerosis is the hardening of the arteries caused by high levels of bad cholesterol that also plays a role in cardiovascular disease. Niacin can help to eliminate the total cholesterol levels. Consuming spelt can improve Niacin intake in the body. Niacin may also help to decrease the development of blood clots. Moreover, the fibre present in spelt can help to eliminate the total as well as the LDL cholesterol levels within the body. Consuming whole grains like spelt at least 6 times every week is advisable for postmenopausal women with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or any other signs of cardiovascular disease. Consumption of spelt shows signs and symptoms of slowed progression of atherosclerosis.

Helps in preventing formation of gallstones

Research says that consuming foods loaded with insoluble fibre, like spelt, might help women prevent gallstones. The insoluble fibre not only speeds up the movement of food within the intestines, but decreases the secretion of bile acids, that in extreme amounts play a role in gallstone development. The insoluble fibre additionally boosts insulin sensitivity as well as lowers triglycerides in the body.

Prevents breast cancer

Fibres given by whole grains offer the most defence against breast cancer. Pre-menopausal women consuming the most whole grain fibre had about 41% reduced chances of developing breast cancer, than others with the lowest whole grain fibre intake.

Uses of Spelt

Spelt has a wide variety of uses. Spelt flour can substitute for modern ‘common’ wheat flour to make breads, pasta, cookies, crackers, cakes, muffins, cereals, pancakes and waffles. In addition to spelt flour, spelt is also available in its de-hulled, whole grain form (often referred to as spelt berries or dinkel berries), which can be prepared and enjoyed like rice.

Side-Effects & Allergies of Spelt

Spelt contains gluten, which may cause problem for people having celiac disease. Celiac disease is a serious digestive disorder that is increasing around the world. It’s also known as celiac sprue, nontropical sprue and gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and is sometimes triggered or activated by childbirth, pregnancy, severe emotional stress, surgery or a viral infection. In some studies when spelt flour was investigated for its toxicity on celiac disease patients, the results suggested that spelt is a celiac-toxic cereal and needs to be avoided. Excess consumption of spelt can also cause diarrhoea, bloating, abdominal pain, irritability, skin rash, muscle cramps, joint pain, upset stomach, or weakness and fatigue.

Cultivation of Spelt

Spelt is around 9000 years old. There are certain proofs that spelt grains were grown by ancient cultures both in Europe and also the Middle East 1000’s of years ago. It is pointed out in the Old Testament as well as in numerous Roman texts. Carbonated grains of spelt have been discovered all through Europe which includes Britain, in lots of Stone Age excavations. Its level of popularity remained prevalent, particularly in Eastern Europe, till the end of the 19th century. German records of one region, dated 1850, demonstrated that 94% of the cereal acreage was producing spelt and just 5% producing bread wheat. The rapid fall from favour of spelt was shown by rapid improvements in modern farming. Once mixed harvesters were introduced that could harvest common bread wheat in one process it might have no longer been so attractive for farmers to continue to grow spelt. This is due to every individual grain of spelt unlike common wheat is covered by the tough external husk that needs removal in the further process prior to grain could be milled into flour.

Thankfully spelt wasn’t completely lost to mankind and in the mid 1980’s it was rediscovered in Europe and it has undergone an important resurgence in lots of parts of the world ever since. Except for this to happen, particular machinery that could de-hull individual spelt grains in commercial amounts must be introduced in the chain of production to make flour. However by this stage it was realized by those taking the lead in this renaissance that the time and cost of having to do this far outweighed the benefits to both farmers and consumers of resurrecting this ancient grain.

Popular Questions & Answers

Plse advise some ayurvedic medicine which will not have side effect for constipation and gas. Currently m using kayam churna for 4-5 days.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hello, Thanks for your query. Try an over-the-counter medicine containing simethicone, which helps to break down gas bubbles. You can try a process of elimination by substituting a gassy food for a non-gassy one, and see which one is giving you the most trouble. A few basic substitutions: • Rice milk for cow’s milk • Bananas, blueberries and melon for apples, peaches and plums • Gluten-free and spelt cereals and bread for wheat and rye products • Bamboo shoots, bok choy, carrot, celery, corn, eggplant, green beans, lettuce, chives, parsnip, pumpkin, and tomato for artichokes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, okra, onions, and peas. I do hope that you have found something helpful and I will be glad to answer any further query. Take care
1 person found this helpful

I'm suffering from gas problem aur pet m hamesha jalan Hoti h food digest nahi hota h kya Karu doctor ko bhi dikhaya koi aaram nahi h suggest me fastest way.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hello, Thanks for your query. Try an over-the-counter medicine containing simethicone, which helps to break down gas bubbles. You can try a process of elimination by substituting a gassy food for a non-gassy one, and see which one is giving you the most trouble. A few basic substitutions: • Rice milk for cow’s milk • Bananas, blueberries and melon for apples, peaches and plums • Gluten-free and spelt cereals and bread for wheat and rye products • Bamboo shoots, bok choy, carrot, celery, corn, eggplant, green beans, lettuce, chives, parsnip, pumpkin, and tomato for artichokes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, okra, onions, and peas. I do hope that you have found something helpful and I will be glad to answer any further query. Take care
1 person found this helpful

I'm male 38 yrs, I'm suffering from gas problem indigestion and over breathing and over tayardnes please tell me suggestions.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hello, Thanks for your query. Try an over-the-counter medicine containing simethicone, which helps to break down gas bubbles. You can try a process of elimination by substituting a gassy food for a non-gassy one, and see which one is giving you the most trouble. A few basic substitutions: • Rice milk for cow’s milk • Bananas, blueberries and melon for apples, peaches and plums • Gluten-free and spelt cereals and bread for wheat and rye products • Bamboo shoots, bok choy, carrot, celery, corn, eggplant, green beans, lettuce, chives, parsnip, pumpkin, and tomato for artichokes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, okra, onions, and peas. I do hope that you have found something helpful and I will be glad to answer any further query. Take care
1 person found this helpful

Hi doctor, aaj kal mujhe stomach me gas bahut banti hai aur stomach m soiling bhi rahti h.kya karu.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hello, Thanks for your query. Try an over-the-counter medicine containing simethicone, which helps to break down gas bubbles. You can try a process of elimination by substituting a gassy food for a non-gassy one, and see which one is giving you the most trouble. A few basic substitutions: • Rice milk for cow’s milk • Bananas, blueberries and melon for apples, peaches and plums • Gluten-free and spelt cereals and bread for wheat and rye products • Bamboo shoots, bok choy, carrot, celery, corn, eggplant, green beans, lettuce, chives, parsnip, pumpkin, and tomato for artichokes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, okra, onions, and peas. I do hope that you have found something helpful and I will be glad to answer any further query. Take care
1 person found this helpful

Dear sir mujhe gas or kabj ke problem hi mera pet kabhi clear nahi hota hi or pet me gas bhari rahti hi eska koi permanent solution bataye plz.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hello, Thanks for your query. Try an over-the-counter medicine containing simethicone, which helps to break down gas bubbles. You can try a process of elimination by substituting a gassy food for a non-gassy one, and see which one is giving you the most trouble. A few basic substitutions: • Rice milk for cow’s milk • Bananas, blueberries and melon for apples, peaches and plums • Gluten-free and spelt cereals and bread for wheat and rye products • Bamboo shoots, bok choy, carrot, celery, corn, eggplant, green beans, lettuce, chives, parsnip, pumpkin, and tomato for artichokes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, okra, onions, and peas. I do hope that you have found something helpful and I will be glad to answer any further query. Take care

Popular Health Tips

Dyslexia - 10 Signs Your Child Maybe Suffering From It!

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Solapur
Dyslexia - 10 Signs Your Child Maybe Suffering From It!

All parents expect their child to start going to school, learn writing and learning and do well in academics. However, children with dyslexia may not be able to progress at school at the same pace as others. The good news is that there are early pointers that can help a parent to identify dyslexia in the early stages. This can be helpful in training and support the child socially to learn and socialise normally.  Dyslexia is a disability that affects both spoken and written language. They have a different learning style and when supported and encouraged, instead of mocked and insulted, they can become avid readers. The following are common 10 indicators of developing dyslexia in children, in general, and at school.

10 Behavioural signs to watch for in general:

  1. The child usually has difficulty concentrating and following instructions
  2. The child is easily distracted, seems to daydream, and tends to forget words.
  3. Poor personal organisation skills and is not very good at time keeping.
  4. May get confused between today, tomorrow, yesterday; east and west; right and left; up and down.
  5. Has difficulty remembering seasons, months and days.
  6. Tends to be doing something to avoid work.
  7. Seems distracted, and ‘daydream,’ does not seem to listen
  8. Requires a lot of effort focusing on things at hand and is constantly tired.
  9. Slow pace of processing in terms of spoken or written language
  10. Often appears withdrawn or lost in his own world.

10 Behaviours to watch for at school:

  1. Poor standard of writing and written work in comparison with oratory skills.
  2. Poor handwriting with badly formed letters.
  3. Confused easily between similar looking letters like m/w, n/u, b/d.
  4. Usually, messes up work by using close but wrong spellings and rewriting the same
  5. Mixes up words by using similar-looking words – quiet and quite, tired and tried.
  6. Same word is spelt differently at different times
  7. Poor motor skills and pencil grip leading to slow, inaccurate writing
  8. Produces a lot of phonetic spelling which does not change with repeated corrections
  9. There is difficulty in blending words together, and struggles a lot when asked to read out loud, can miss out or add words that are familiar in between
  10. Has difficulty connecting the story that is being written or read

As noted, these children have very inconsistent behaviour with very limited understanding of nonverbal communication. If these symptoms go on increasing as they grow, it is advisable to seek professional help so that support can be provided and the condition can be arrested at the early stages. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Psychiatrist.

2964 people found this helpful

Food To Eat And Avoid In Celiac Disease!

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai

Allowed foods in celiac disease are: 

Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free:

  • Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form
  • Fresh eggs
  • Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated)
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Most dairy products

It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet, such as:

  • Amaranth
  • Arrowroot
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn and cornmeal
  • Flax
  • Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean)
  • Hominy (corn)
  • Millet
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Sorghum
  • Soy
  • Tapioca
  • Teff 


Always avoid these foods with celiac: 

Avoid all food and drinks containing:

  • Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
  • Rye
  • Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
  • Wheat

Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. 

Here are other wheat products to avoid:

  • Durum flour
  • Farina
  • Graham flour
  • Kamut
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Avoid unless labeled'gluten-free'

In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain:

  • Beer
  • Breads
  • Cakes and pies
  • Candies
  • Cereals
  • Communion wafers
  • Cookies and crackers
  • Croutons
  • French fries
  • Gravies
  • Imitation meat or seafood
  • Matzo
  • Pastas
  • Processed luncheon meats
  • Salad dressings
  • Sauces, including soy sauce
  • Seasoned rice mixes
  • Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
  • Self-basting poultry
  • Soups and soup bases
  • Vegetables in sauce

Certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free.

You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include:

Food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others
Medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent.

3 people found this helpful

All About Paleo Diet!

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
All About Paleo Diet!

The paleo diet includes whole, unprocessed foods that resemble what they look like in nature.

Our ancestors were genetically the same as modern humans. They thrived eating such foods and were free of diseases like obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Several studies suggest that this diet can lead to significant weight loss (without calorie counting).

A paleo diet meal plan-

The basics

  1. Eat: meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, healthy fats and oils.
  2. Avoid: processed foods, sugar, soft drinks, grains, most dairy products, legumes, artificial sweeteners, vegetable oils, margarine and trans fats.
  3. Avoid these foods


Avoid these foods and ingredients:

  1. Sugar and high fructose corn syrup: soft drinks, fruit juices, table sugar, candy, pastries, ice cream and many others.
  2. Grains: includes breads and pastas, wheat, spelt, rye, barley, etc.
  3. Legumes: beans, lentils and many more.
  4. Dairy: avoid most dairy, especially low-fat (some versions of paleo do include full-fat dairy like butter and cheese).
  5. Vegetable oils: soybean oil, sunflower oil, cottonseed oil, corn oil, grapeseed oil, safflower oil and others.
  6. Trans fats: found in margarine and various processed foods. Usually referred to as “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” oils.
  7. Artificial sweeteners: aspartame, sucralose, cyclamates, saccharin, acesulfame potassium. Use natural sweeteners instead.
  8. Highly processed foods: everything labelled “diet” or “low-fat” or has many weird ingredients. Includes artificial meal replacements.


Foods to eat on the paleo diet-

Base your diet on these real, unprocessed paleo foods.

  1. Meats: beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, pork and others.
  2. Fish and seafood: salmon, trout, haddock, shrimp, shellfish, etc. Choose wild-caught if you can.
  3. Eggs: choose free-range, pastured or omega-3 enriched eggs.
  4. Vegetables: broccoli, kale, peppers, onions, carrots, tomatoes, etc.
  5. Fruits: apples, bananas, oranges, pears, avocados, strawberries, blueberries and more.
  6. Tubers: potatoes, sweet potatoes, yams, turnips, etc.
  7. Nuts and seeds: almonds, macadamia nuts, walnuts, hazelnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and more.
  8. Healthy fats and oils: lard, tallow, coconut oil, olive oil, avocado oil and others.
  9. Salt and spices: sea salt, himalayan salt, garlic, turmeric, rosemary, etc.

Try to choose grass-fed, pasture raised and organic if you can afford it. If not, then just make sure to always go for the least processed option.

These are perfectly healthy in small amounts:

1. Wine: quality red wine is high in antioxidants and beneficial nutrients.
2. Dark chocolate: choose one that has 70% or higher cocoa content. Quality dark chocolate is very nutritious and extremely healthy.

What to drink when you’re thirsty -

Glass of water

  1. When it comes to hydration, water should be your go-to beverage.
  2. These aren’t exactly paleo, but most people drink them anyway:
  3. Tea is very healthy and loaded with antioxidants and various beneficial compounds. Green tea is best.
  4. Coffee is actually very high in antioxidants as well. 


A sample paleo menu for one week -

Monday

1. Breakfast: eggs and vegetables, fried in coconut oil. One piece of fruit.
2. Lunch: chicken salad, with olive oil. Handful of nuts.
3. Dinner: burgers (no bun), fried in butter, with vegetables and some salsa.

Tuesday

  1. Breakfast: bacon and eggs, with a piece of fruit.
  2. Lunch: leftover burgers from the night before.
  3. Dinner: salmon, fried in butter, with vegetables.

Wednesday

  1. Breakfast: meat with vegetables (leftovers from night before).
  2. Lunch: sandwich in a lettuce leaf, with meat and fresh vegetables.
  3. Dinner: ground beef stir fry, with vegetables. Some berries.

Thursday

  1. Breakfast: eggs and a fruit.
  2. Lunch: leftover stir fry from the night before. A handful of nuts.
  3. Dinner: fried pork, with vegetables.

Friday

  1. Breakfast: eggs and vegetables, fried in coconut oil.
  2. Lunch: chicken salad with olive oil. Handful of nuts.
  3. Dinner: steak with vegetables and sweet potatoes.

Saturday

  1. Breakfast: bacon and eggs, with a piece of fruit.
  2. Lunch: leftover steak and vegetables from the night before.
  3. Dinner: baked salmon with vegetables and avocado.

Sunday

  1. Breakfast: meat with vegetables (leftovers from night before).
  2. Lunch: sandwich in a lettuce leaf, with meat and fresh vegetables.
  3. Dinner: grilled chicken wings, with vegetables and salsa.
1 person found this helpful

Elimination Diet - What Should You Eat and What You Should Not?

Diploma In Nutrition & Health Education
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Ahmedabad
Elimination Diet - What Should You Eat and What You Should Not?

If you are looking for an ideal, healthy diet which will help in improving your GI’s or general symptoms, you should opt for an elimination diet. It is an effective dietary approach, which is useful for addressing individual needs along with certain benefits for everyone who undertakes the diet. This diet is especially useful if you suffer from food sensitivities. In the elimination diet, certain food items are eliminated from your diet for a certain period of time. They are slowly reintroduced in your diet after a span of three to four weeks. You should be as restrictive as possible for the diet to produce effective results.

In a good elimination diet, you should cut off food items such as gluten, soy, eggs, dairy, corn, beef, chicken, pork, beans, lentils, citrus fruits, nuts, coffee and several nightshade vegetables. Your diet should primarily compose of rice, meat such as turkey, lamb, or fish, several fruits and vegetables. Food items to include and exclude as part of an elimination diet

Here is a list of the various types of food items, some of which need to be avoided and excluded during an elimination diet:

  1. Fruits and vegetables: You should include all forms of fresh fruits. Have fruits raw and have the vegetables in steamed, roasted or sautéed form. Exclude citrus fruits and vegetables like tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplant.
  2. Starch: You should consume rice and buckwheat and avoid corn, barley, spelt, rye and other products which contain high gluten.
  3. Legumes: Avoid consuming legumes such as soybean, tempeh, tofu, soya milk, peas, lentils and all forms of beans. Also avoid all types of seeds and nuts.
  4. Meat and fish: Consume meats such as turkey, lamb, wild game and fish. Stay away from chicken, pork, eggs, canned meat, sausages, shellfish and soy made meat substitutes.
  5. Dairy products:Consume coconut milk and unsweetened rice milk. Do not not consume cow milk, cheese, cream, butter, ice cream, yogurt and non-dairy creamers.
  6. Fats: Consume fats such as flax seed oil, coconut oil and cold expeller pressed olive oil. Avoid margarine, butter, mayonnaise, spreads and hydrogenated oils.
  7. Beverages: Drink a lot of water and consume herbal teas such as rooibos and peppermint tea. Strictly avoid alcohol, coffee, green tea and soda.
  8. Spices and condiments: Include spices such as sea salt, fresh herbs and spices such as oregano, parsley, thyme, rosemary and fresh pepper in your diet. Do not consume chocolate, mustard, relish, chutney, soy sauce, vinegar and barbecue sauce.

In case of sweeteners, you should use stevia if required. Avoid using honey, maple syrup, corn syrup, desserts, high fructose corn syrups and white or brown sugar. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Dietitian/Nutritionist.

3125 people found this helpful

Top 10 Tips For Gluten Free Diet

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai

Top 10 Tips for a Gluten-Free Diet

Coeliac disease is a lifelong, serious autoimmune disease caused by the immune system reacting to gluten - a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The only treatment for the condition is a strict gluten-free diet for life.
For those newly diagnosed with the condition, the prospect of a strict gluten-free diet may seem daunting at first; but armed with the right knowledge, the gluten-free diet can be relatively easy to adapt to. 

1. Get used to reading food labels when you shop.

All packaged food in the uk and the eu is covered by a law on allergen labelling, meaning you can tell whether or not a product is suitable for a gluten-free diet by reading the ingredients list. If a cereal containing gluten has been used as an ingredient in the product, it must be listed in the ingredients list (no matter how little is used).
The specific grain will be listed, so look out for mentions of wheat, rye, barley, oats, spelt, kamut or any other grain which has been made through breeding these together as these all contain gluten. Often, these ingredients will be highlighted in bold.
 

2. Use gluten-free substitutes in place of gluten-containing foods

Pasta, bread and crackers all contain gluten, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy these foods in your diet. Instead, switch to gluten-free alternatives of your favourite foods, which you will find in most supermarkets and health food stores. Gluten-free substitute foods include pasta, bread, crackers, bread rolls, cereals and more. Those medically diagnosed with coeliac disease can receive some gluten-free staple food on prescription from the nhs.
 

3. Remember lots of foods are naturally gluten-free

Fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, poultry, fish, cheese and eggs are naturally gluten-free, so use these as the basis to your meals.
 

4. Enjoy naturally gluten-free grains and cereals. 

The gluten-free diet doesn’t mean that all grains and cereals are off the menu. Quinoa, teff, amaranth, polenta, buckwheat, corn, millet and tapioca are just some of the naturally gluten-free grains which can be included in the diet. Just check the labels to make sure you are using uncontaminated versions. Try swapping traditional breadcrumbs for polenta crumbs, opt for gluten-free buckwheat or rice noodles and pasta and try baking with quinoa for gluten-free alternatives.

5. Know which alcohol to avoid

Gluten-free alcohol includes cider, wine, sherry, spirits, port and liqueurs, but remember that beer, lagers, stouts and ales contain varying amounts of gluten and are not suitable for a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free beers are available in some supermarkets and restaurants, but make sure you only drink those that are labelled in this way. 
 

6. Remember you can still enjoy meals out with family and friends

Being on a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean that you can’t eat out – check out coeliac uk’s online venue guide to see where you can eat out gluten-free.
 
7. Be aware of cross contamination

Even a tiny bit of gluten can be enough to cause symptoms for someone with coeliac disease, so make sure you minimise the risk of cross contamination with gluten-containing foods. Do this by washing down kitchen surfaces before use, using separate butters, spreads and jams to minimise the spread of crumbs and invest in some toaster bags to keep your gluten-free bread separate.
 
8. Avoid sauces containing gluten

Lots of pasta sauces, gravies, stocks and condiments contain wheat flour, and therefore gluten, so ensure you read the label and exclude anything that isn’t suitable. Instead, try making your own pasta sauces and gravies using cornflour, arrowroot or potato starch to thicken them for a gluten-free option.
 
9. Experiment in the kitchen flour

Finding the right gluten-free substitute for your usual gluten-containing ingredients is a matter of personal taste, so spend time in the kitchen getting used to gluten-free flours and baking aids.
 
10. Remember, gluten-free meals can be just as delicious and healthy too

Once diagnosed with coeliac disease, you can start to make positive changes to your diet to improve your health. Join coeliac uk for support to help you adjust, which includes a food and drink directory listing products to help you get started in the kitchen.

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Table of Content

Spelt
Nutritional Value of Spelt
Health Benefits of Spelt
Helps in improving the digestive health
Helps in lowering the level of cholesterol
Helps in improving blood circulation
Helps in hormonal regulation and creation
Helps in maintaining bone health
Helps in growth and development
Helps in maintaining a healthy immune system
Helps in diabetes control
Helps patients with migraine headache
Helps in preventing atherosclerosis & cardiovascular diseases
Helps in preventing formation of gallstones
Prevents breast cancer
Uses of Spelt
Side-Effects & Allergies of Spelt
Cultivation of Spelt