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Overview

SGOT (AST) Test

SGOT (AST) Test

also known as: Serum Glutamic Oxaloacetic Transaminase , SGOT , Transaminases

The SGOT (serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase), or AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is a test that is conducted to check for liver damage and issues related to it. The liver is a very vital organ of our body and is responsible for the performance of several functions such as making Bile juice that helps in the digestion process. There are several factors that can cause liver damage such as hepatitis and alcohol or drug use. The liver makes the enzyme AST; the level of which remains low in the blood as long as the liver is normal. When there is liver damage, the AST level rises. If you have symptoms of liver damage such as jaundice, swollen belly, stomach ache, itchy skin, dark coloured urine, etc.

You do not need to prepare specifically for the test. You only have to make sure that you have gathered all the information from your doctor and are well aware of the process and the medications. Apart from this, your doctor would also like to know the medicines or supplements you take as certain medications can affect the test.

The test results are usually available in a few days’ time. The normal units for males and females are: Males: 10 to 40 units/litre Females: 9 to 32 units/litre If you have more AST than what is normal, it may mean that you have the following conditions: Chronic hepatitis Damage and scarring of the liver known as Cirrhosis Blockage of the bile ducts Liver Cancer Very high levels of AST may also point towards Acute Viral Hepatitis, Damage caused to the liver due to the usage of alcohol or drugs, or a blockage to the blood flow in the liver. Depending on your results and condition, your doctor will prescribe the best course of medication and treatment for you.

For the test, your doctor or lab technician will place a plastic band on your upper arm; this is done to fill up the vein with blood and swell up. Then, he or she will clean the area with an antiseptic and put a needle. He will then draw a blood and keep it in a vial or tube. This process usually takes a few minutes. The collected blood is then sent to the lab for analysis.

Specimen
Serum (preferred) or plasma
Volume
1 mL
Container
Red-top tube, gel-barrier tube, green-top (heparin) tube, or lavender-top (EDTA) tube.
Type Gender Age-Group Value
Aspartate Aminotransferase - SGOT
Unisex
All age groups
5-40 units
Average price range of the test is between Rs.80 to Rs.305 depending on the factors of city, quality and availablity.

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Popular Questions & Answers

How to reduce SGPT, sgot. Which medicine should I get, what precautions and diet you suggest.

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Pune
How to reduce SGPT, sgot. Which medicine should I get, what precautions and diet you suggest.
Lyco 30 3times days for 4days Nux vom 30 as above Cardus 30 3times days for 4days Nat sulph 3c as above

My sgpt (77), sgot (48) and cholesterol (234) becomes high inspite of all food precautions if I stop exercise and walk. My hba1c is 6.7 and my ige result is 51. I am diagnosed with nickel allergy in food. What could be the reasons?

MBBS, Dip.Cardiology, Fellowship in Clinical Cardiology(FICC), Fellowship in Echocardiology
Cardiologist, Ghaziabad
My sgpt (77), sgot (48) and cholesterol (234) becomes high inspite of all food precautions if I stop exercise and wal...
Allergy is not related to diabetes or cholesterol, Cholesterol depends on diet and Exercise.(BOTH) also you need to check your LDL & HDL levels. To see if you need lipid lowering medications.

Why I am getting fatty liver and high cholesterol inspite of all food precautions. What are the factors which effects sgpt and sgot. My hba1c is 6.7 and I am diagnosed with nickel allergy in food.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
Why I am getting fatty liver and high cholesterol inspite of all food precautions. What are the factors which effects...
Dear user. I understand. The higher rates according my opinion is fatty liver. Because nowadays people are less to do sport and like to eat fastfood, while on fastfood there were high cholesterol and if body difficult to convert it. The cholesterol will circulate around your body through the blood. So on the lab test the lipid profile show high level (high LDL, trygliseride, and total cholesterol. But low HDL). LDL was bad cholesterol, while HDL is a good cholesterol. If the cholesterol to much in our body it can be deposit through all your body but if the lipid deposit in your liver it can cause fatty liver. Fatty liver is a condition where the surface and inside your liver cover by lipid. Sometimes lipid can kill the healthy liver cell, so that makes lab test for SGOT and SGPT increased. Exercises and food control can reverse the fatty liver condition. Talk to your doctor. Take care.
1 person found this helpful

Hi my age is 32 and my weight is 45 kg. Muje bhuk nhi lagti aur man bhi nhi karta kuch kahane ka .every time fill like vomiting feel weakness also and too much of pain in my body.

BHMS
Homeopath, Mumbai
Hi my age is 32 and my weight is 45 kg. Muje bhuk nhi lagti aur man bhi nhi karta kuch kahane ka .every time fill lik...
your wt is too low according to your e age, you can start homeopathy plan for wt gain and good appetite ,pain and vomiting for a year which will help you a lotpls check your SGPT, SGOT, S.Bilirubin if symptoms are for less than a month.
2 people found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

INSTITUTE OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINES
Ayurveda, Delhi
What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

What is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's:

  • Menstrual cycle
  • Ability to have children
  • Hormones
  • Heart
  • Blood vessels
  • Appearance

With PCOS, women typically have:

  • High levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, though females also make them.
  • Missed or irregular periods (monthly bleeding)
  • Many small cysts (sists) (fluid-filled sacs) in their ovaries

How many women have PCOS?

Between 1 in 10 and 1 in 20 women of childbearing age has PCOS. As many as 5 million women in the United States may be affected. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old.

What causes PCOS?

The cause of PCOS is unknown. But most experts think that several factors, including genetics, could play a role. Women with PCOS are more likely to have a mother or sister with PCOS.

A main underlying problem with PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries make more androgens than normal. Androgens are male hormones that females also make. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation.

Researchers also think insulin may be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. Many women with PCOS have too much insulin in their bodies because they have problems using it. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. High androgen levels can lead to:

  • Acne
  • Excessive hair growth
  • Weight gain
  • Problems with ovulation

What are the symptoms of PCOS?

The symptoms of PCOS can vary from woman to woman. Some of the symptoms of PCOS include:

  • Infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating. In fact, PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility.
  • Infrequent, absent, and/or irregular menstrual periods
  • Hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um) — increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes
  • Cysts on the ovaries
  • Acne, oily skin, or dandruff
  • Weight gain or obesity, usually with extra weight around the waist
  • Male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
  • Patches of skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs that are thick and dark brown or black
  • Skin tags — excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
  • Pelvic pain
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Sleep apnea — when breathing stops for short periods of time while asleep

Why do women with PCOS have trouble with their menstrual cycle and fertility?

The ovaries, where a woman's eggs are produced, have tiny fluid-filled sacs called follicles or cysts. As the egg grows, the follicle builds up fluid. When the egg matures, the follicle breaks open, the egg is released, and the egg travels through the fallopian tube to the uterus (womb) for fertilization. This is called ovulation.

In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for an egg to fully mature. The follicles may start to grow and build up fluid but ovulation does not occur. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. For these reasons, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the ovaries make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.
 

Does PCOS change at menopause?

Yes and no. PCOS affects many systems in the body. So, many symptoms may persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male-pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications (health problems) from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke, and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

How do I know if I have PCOS?

There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take the following steps to find out if you have PCOS or if something else is causing your symptoms.

Medical history. Your doctor will ask about your menstrual periods, weight changes, and other symptoms.

Physical exam. Your doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check the areas of increased hair growth. You should try to allow the natural hair to grow for a few days before the visit.

Pelvic exam. Your doctor might want to check to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts.

Blood tests. Your doctor may check the androgen hormone and glucose (sugar) levels in your blood.

Vaginal ultrasound (sonogram). Your doctor may perform a test that uses sound waves to take pictures of the pelvic area. It might be used to examine your ovaries for cysts and check the endometrium (en-do-MEE-tree-uhm) (lining of the womb). This lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular.

How is PCOS treated?

Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals. Some treatments for PCOS include:

Lifestyle modification. Many women with PCOS are overweight or obese, which can cause health problems. You can help manage your PCOS by eating healthy and exercising to keep your weight at a healthy level. Healthy eating tips include:

  • Limiting processed foods and foods with added sugars
  • Adding more whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats to your diet

This helps to lower blood glucose (sugar) levels, improve the body's use of insulin, and normalize hormone levels in your body. Even a 10 percent loss in body weight can restore a normal period and make your cycle more regular.

Birth control pills. For women who don't want to get pregnant, birth control pills can:

  • Control menstrual cycles
  • Reduce male hormone levels
  • Help to clear acne

Keep in mind that the menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone (proh-JES-tuh-rohn), like Provera, to control the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of endometrial cancer (See Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?). But, progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

Diabetes medications. The medicine metformin (Glucophage) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It has also been found to help with PCOS symptoms, though it isn't approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this use. Metformin affects the way insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) and lowers testosterone production. It slows the growth of abnormal hair and, after a few months of use, may help ovulation to return. Recent research has shown metformin to have other positive effects, such as decreased body mass and improved cholesterol levels. Metformin will not cause a person to become diabetic.

Fertility medications. Lack of ovulation is usually the reason for fertility problems in women with PCOS. Several medications that stimulate ovulation can help women with PCOS become pregnant. Even so, other reasons for infertility in both the woman and man should be ruled out before fertility medications are used. Also, some fertility medications increase the risk for multiple births (twins, triplets). Treatment options include:

  • Clomiphene (KLOHM-uh-feen) (Clomid, Serophene) — the first choice therapy to stimulate ovulation for most patients.
  • Metformin taken with clomiphene — may be tried if clomiphene alone fails. The combination may help women with PCOS ovulate on lower doses of medication.
  • Gonadotropins (goe-NAD-oh-troe-pins) — given as shots, but are more expensive and raise the risk of multiple births compared to clomiphene.

Another option is in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF offers the best chance of becoming pregnant in any given cycle. It also gives doctors better control over the chance of multiple births. But, IVF is very costly.

Surgery. "Ovarian drilling" is a surgery that may increase the chance of ovulation. It's sometimes used when a woman does not respond to fertility medicines. The doctor makes a very small cut above or below the navel (belly button) and inserts a small tool that acts like a telescope into the abdomen (stomach). This is called laparoscopy (lap-uh-RAHS-kuh-pee). The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But, these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with loss of scalp hair or increased hair growth on other parts of the body.

Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. Medicines called anti-androgens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (speer-on-oh-LAK-tone) (Aldactone), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce the impact of male hormones on hair growth in women. Finasteride (fin-AST-uhr-yd) (Propecia), a medicine taken by men for hair loss, has the same effect. Anti-androgens are often combined with birth control pills.  These medications should not be taken if you are trying to become pregnant.

Before taking Aldactone, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed while taking this medicine. Women who may become pregnant should not handle Propecia.

Other options include:

  • Vaniqa (van-ik-uh) cream to reduce facial hair
  • Laser hair removal or electrolysis to remove hair
  • Hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing

Other treatments. Some research has shown that bariatric (weight loss) surgery may be effective in resolving PCOS in morbidly obese women. Morbid obesity means having a BMI of more than 40, or a BMI of 35 to 40 with an obesity-related disease. The drug troglitazone (troh-GLIT-uh-zohn) was shown to help women with PCOS. But, it was taken off the market because it caused liver problems. Similar drugs without the same side effect are being tested in small trials.

Researchers continue to search for new ways to treat PCOS. To learn more about current PCOS treatment studies, visit ClinicalTrials.gov. Talk to your doctor about whether taking part in a clinical trial might be right for you.

How does PCOS affect a woman while pregnant?

Women with PCOS appear to have higher rates of:

Babies born to women with PCOS have a higher risk of spending time in a neonatal intensive care unit or of dying before, during, or shortly after birth. Most of the time, these problems occur in multiple-birth babies (twins, triplets).

Researchers are studying whether the diabetes medicine metformin can prevent or reduce the chances of having problems while pregnant. Metformin also lowers male hormone levels and limits weight gain in women who are obese when they get pregnant.

Metformin is an FDA pregnancy category B drug. It does not appear to cause major birth defects or other problems in pregnant women. But, there have only been a few studies of metformin use in pregnant women to confirm its safety. Talk to your doctor about taking metformin if you are pregnant or are trying to become pregnant. Also, metformin is passed through breastmilk. Talk with your doctor about metformin use if you are a nursing mother.

Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?

Women with PCOS have greater chances of developing several serious health conditions, including life-threatening diseases. Recent studies found that:

  • More than 50 percent of women with PCOS will have diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) before the age of 40.
  • The risk of heart attack is 4 to 7 times higher in women with PCOS than women of the same age without PCOS.
  • Women with PCOS are at greater risk of having high blood pressure.
  • Women with PCOS have high levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol.
  • Women with PCOS can develop sleep apnea. This is when breathing stops for short periods of time during sleep.

Women with PCOS may also develop anxiety and depression. It is important to talk to your doctor about treatment for these mental health conditions.

Women with PCOS are also at risk for endometrial cancer. Irregular menstrual periods and the lack of ovulation cause women to produce the hormone estrogen, but not the hormone progesterone. Progesterone causes the endometrium (lining of the womb) to shed each month as a menstrual period. Without progesterone, the endometrium becomes thick, which can cause heavy or irregular bleeding. Over time, this can lead to endometrial hyperplasia, when the lining grows too much, and cancer.

I have PCOS. What can I do to prevent complications?

If you have PCOS, get your symptoms under control at an earlier age to help reduce your chances of having complications like diabetes and heart disease. Talk to your doctor about treating all your symptoms, rather than focusing on just one aspect of your PCOS, such as problems getting pregnant. Also, talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes regularly. Other steps you can take to lower your chances of health problems include:

  • Eating right
  • Exercising
  • Not smoking

How can I cope with the emotional effects of PCOS?

Having PCOS can be difficult. You may feel:

  • Embarrassed by your appearance
  • Worried about being able to get pregnant
  • Depressed

Getting treatment for PCOS can help with these concerns and help boost your self-esteem. You may also want to look for support groups in your area or online to help you deal with the emotional effects of PCOS. You are not alone and there are resources available for women with PCOS.

 

 

 

10 people found this helpful

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Fatty Liver
It is also called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in adults.
It is an ongoing silent epidemic in India.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to the presence of hepatic steatosis when there are no other causes for secondary hepatic fat accumulation such as heavy alcohol consumption.
NAFLD may progress to cirrhosis and is likely an important cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis
NAFLD is subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).
In NAFLD, hepatic steatosis is present without evidence of inflammation, whereas in NASH, hepatic steatosis is associated with hepatic inflammation that histologically is indistinguishable from alcoholic steatohepatitis
Risk factors for cirrhosis are, older age, diabetes, SGOT SGPT >2 times, BMI >28, higher visceral adiposity index, which takes into account waist circumference, BMI, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein level, less coffee consumption, heavy alcohol intake
As little as two drinks per day in those who are overweight (and one drink per day in those who are obese) is associated in hepatic injury.
Liver cancer is associated with cirrhosis due to NAFLD.
Heart disease is the most common cause of death among patients with NAFLD.
Weight loss for patients who are overweight or obese is recommended.
Goal for many patients is to lose 0.5 to 1 kg/week (1 to 2 lb/week).
Vaccination for Hepatitis A and B, pneumococcal vaccination and standard immunizations (e.G, influenza, diphtheria, tetanus boosters) are recommended for the population in general.
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be managed.
Vitamin E at a dose of 400 IU/day may be suggested for those patients with advanced fibrosis on biopsy who do not have diabetes or coronary artery disease.
Avoid all alcohol consumption.
Heavy alcohol use is associated with disease progression among patients with NAFLD.
Thiazolidinediones can improve histologic parameters in patients with NASH, metformin does not.
UDCA has anti-inflammatory effects in the liver
Atorvastatin has protective effect on SGOT, SGPT levels in patients with NAFLD.
Pentoxifylline inhibits production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and may be effective in NASH.
Omega-3 fatty acids may benefit NAFLD or NASH.
If serum ferritin >1.5 times the upper limit of normal: Progressive liver disease:
If SGOT:SGPT > twice the upper limit of normal, then refer
9 people found this helpful

B.H.M.S
Homeopath, Kolkata
Effective home remedies for a healthy liver

The liver is one busiest organs of the body. From producing bile for digestion to eliminating toxins from the body, the liver performs more than 500 different functions. Unfortunately, with modern-day lifestyle (increased junk food consumption, heavy drinking, incessant smoking, skyrocketing stress levels and self-medication), liver diseases are emerging rapidly. But there are ways you can reduce the effects of these ill habits on your liver and keep it healthy. Here are some natural remedies you can try.
#1 Amla or Gooseberry: The Indian gooseberry or amla is known as one of the richest sources of vitamin C. What is less well-known is its ability to keep the liver functioning at optimal levels. This herb has been used extensively in Ayurveda for the treatment of sluggish liver; now researchers are finding in laboratory studies that extracts from amla have liver-protective function. However, there is no clear indication of whether it is useful to treat hepatitis B infection. Amla is one of the important components in Chyawanpraash that has immunity boosting, digestive and liver-protective action.

Home / Diseases & Conditions / 6 effective home remedies for a healthy liver

Natural foods for the liver
The liver is one busiest organs of the body. From producing bile for digestion to eliminating toxins from the body, the liver performs more than 500 different functions. Unfortunately, with modern-day lifestyle (increased junk food consumption, heavy drinking, incessant smoking, skyrocketing stress levels and self-medication), liver diseases are emerging rapidly. But there are ways you can reduce the effects of these ill habits on your liver and keep it healthy. Here are some natural remedies you can try.
#1 Amla or Gooseberry: The Indian gooseberry or amla is known as one of the richest sources of vitamin C. What is less well-known is its ability to keep the liver functioning at optimal levels. This herb has been used extensively in Ayurveda for the treatment of sluggish liver; now researchers are finding in laboratory studies that extracts from amla have liver-protective function. However, there is no clear indication of whether it is useful to treat hepatitis B infection. Amla is one of the important components in Chyawanpraash that has immunity boosting, digestive and liver-protective action.

Tip: Although, the best way to consume it is raw, you can add small pieces of it in your salad or making a raitha with grated amla and curd.
#2 Jethimad or Licorice: Licorice has long been used in Ayurvedic remedies to cure liver ailments like non- alcoholic fatty liver disease. In this condition, the blood level of transaminase enzymes called ALT and AST increase to harmful levels for the liver. Research suggests that licorice (Jethimad or Mulhati in Hindi) extracts reduce the concentration of these enzymes, indicating its beneficial effect on the liver. Here are
top ten health benefits of Mulethi or Liquorice
Tip: Powder Licorice roots at home. Add the powder to boiling water while making tea. Steep it for a few minutes and then strain the liquid.
#3 Amrith or Guduchi: Amrith is yet another herb that Ayurveda considers to have rejuvenating properties and is commonly grown in many kitchen gardens. It is said to have the ability to clear toxins from the liver as well as strengthen its functioning. More importantly, Amrith does not cause any significant complications even when used for long-term. However, Ayurvedic physicians warn that using this herb can precipitate liver crisis if the patient has a large amount of toxins in the liver. Therefore, it is best to use this herb only under an Ayurvedic practitioner?s guidance.
Haldi or Turmeric: Packed with valuable antioxidants, turmeric is an important herb that improves liver health. Some studies have shown that the antiviral action of turmeric is effective in preventing multiplication of the viruses causing hepatitis B and C. Here are
7 reasons to start drinking turmeric milk or haldi doodh.

Tip: The easiest way to use turmeric is to include it in your daily cooking. Alternatively, you can consume it by adding it to plain milk .
#4 Flaxseeds: Certain receptor sites normally bind hormones and keep them circulating in the blood. This exerts strain on the liver to filter out these excess hormones. Studies have found that the phytoconstituents in flaxseeds have the capacity to bind such receptor sites, preventing hormonal binding. This reduces the work load on the liver. Read about
five seeds that you need to add to your diet
Tip: Sprinkling few crushed or whole flaxseeds on your toast, salad or cereals to reap their liver-protective benefits.
#5 Vegetables: Certain vegetables contain ingredients that help the liver secrete greater concentrations of important enzymes. In turn, these enzymes help excretion of potential carcinogens (cancer-causing substances) from the body. Beet, cabbage, carrot, broccoli, onion and garlic are some vegetables having such an action. Broccoli, onion and garlic are believed to provide sulfur to the body. This helps detoxification reactions carried out by the liver, preventing damage.

While these natural remedies can help your liver stay healthy, it is also important that you avoid eating foods that damage the liver.
43 people found this helpful