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Overview

Benefits of Jicama And Its Side Effects

Jicama is one vegetable that you would love to include in your diet. And it is more so because it offers a whole lot of health benefits. These include helping you to manage your weight , improves your digestion, helps prevent various types of cancer, helps prevent diabetes and also takes care of your bones. In addition to all these, it also helps to regulate blood circulation, lowers blood pressure and is even good for your brain.

Benefits of Jicama And Its Side Effects

Table of Content

Jicama
Nutritional Value of Jicama
Health Benefits of Jicama
Helps the formation of good bacteria
Helps in digestion
Regulates blood pressure
Good for your brain
Helps you lose weight
Reduces the risk of cardiovascular problems
Helps to improve blood circulation
Improves your mood
Keep our bones healthy
Strengthens our immune system
Uses of Jicama
Side-Effects & Allergies of Jicama
Cultivation of Jicama

Jicama

Jicama is a round and bulbous root vegetable which originated in the Mexican peninsula. It is part of the legume family and grows on vines. The name ‘jicama’ is actually the name of the vine of this vegetable although the tuberous root is the most commonly eaten part. It is also known as Chinese potato, yam bean, Chinese turnip or Mexican potato. It has texture very similar to that of turnips while it tastes similar to an apple.

Nutritional Value of Jicama

Jicama is low in calories but high in a few vital nutrients. It provides one quarter of our body’s daily fiber requirement. It is also a very source of Vitamin C which protects our body against various diseases. It contains healthy amounts of potassium which is responsible for keeping our heart in good shape. In addition, jicama contains vitamins like folates, riboflavin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, thiamine and minerals like copper, manganese, magnesium and iron. However, like potatoes, jicama is rich in carbohydrates.

Health Benefits of Jicama

Mentioned below are the best health benefits of Jicama
Health Benefits of Jicama

Helps the formation of good bacteria

The fiber that is present in jicama often contains oligofructose inunlin. This fiber has zero calories and cannot be easily metabolized in our body. Inulin helps the formation of good bacteria and thus helps to maintain a balanced immunity and a healthy colon.

Helps in digestion

The high levels of dietary fiber in jicama helps to add bulk to stool and facilitates its smooth movement through the digestive tract and thus prevents constipation. Moreover, it contains oligofructose inulin which is a sweet, inert carbohydrate that does not break down into simple sugars. This allows people with diabetes to have sweetfood without worrying about their blood sugar levels.

Regulates blood pressure

Jicama is a good source of potassium which is a good vasodilator. So it helps to regulate blood pressure by reducing the tension on blood vessels and arteries, and thereby lowers stress on the entire cardiovascular system. Potassium also helps to maintain fluid balance in our body in opposition to sodium.

Good for your brain

Vitamin B6, present in jicama, is a nutrient that helps to increase cognitive abilities and brain functionalities. Vitamin B6 also helps to break down all the body proteins into other proteins and amino acids that helps to improve the metabolic processes and functioning of various organs. Thus incorporating jicama in your diet can help to boost the functioning of your brain.

Helps you lose weight

It is important for people trying to lose weight to incorporate food which is low in calories in their diet. Jicama is low in calories but rich in nutrients. It also contains a healthy content of dietary fiber that fills you up and prevents you from overeating and, hence, helps you to lose weight.

Reduces the risk of cardiovascular problems

Jicama has proven anti-homocysteine properties and helps to lower the level of amino acids. Homocysteine is one amino acid that is responsible for causing heart and renal diseases. By lowering levels of homocysteine, jicama thus helps to lower risks of cardiovascular diseases.

Helps to improve blood circulation

Copper and iron, two important elements of red blood cells, are found in jicama. They help to maintain the proper circulation of blood through the blood vessels. Jicama aids the formation of red blood cells and thus helps to prevent anemia and stimulates proper functioning of body organs.

Improves your mood

Jicama has Vitamin-B6 that has a direct effect on the transmitters responsible for controlling our mood. They help in preventing depression, anxiety, fatigue and pain. Thus consuming jicama helps to meet our bodily requirement of Vitamin B6 and thus elevates our mood.

Keep our bones healthy

Jicama is rich in minerals like manganese, magnesium, iron and copper which help to improve our bone density. Thus consumption of jicama helps to keep our bones strong and even prevents any damage to them.

Strengthens our immune system

Vitamin C, which stimulates the production of white blood cells in our bodies, is present in good quantities in jicama. Vitamin C has antioxidant properties that enable it to fight against the disease causing free radicals in our bodies and prevent the onset of cancer and heart diseases. Vitamin C helps to prevent bacterial, viral, pathogenic and fungal diseases and hence helps to boost body immunity.

Uses of Jicama

Jicama is a versatile vegetable and is great to use in stir-fries, salads, slaw, soups and in dishes with other vegetables and fruits like oranges, apples, carrots and onions. You can consume it in a variety of ways. You can chop it, cube it, slice it into fine sticks, eat it raw or even cook it.

Side-Effects & Allergies of Jicama

Other than the roots, other parts of the jicama plant like leaves, vines and flowers contain a toxic substance called rotenone. So it is advisable not to consume anything other than the roots. Jicama contains huge fiber content and so excessive consumption leads to digestive disorders like constipation and stomach ache. It is not advisable for people to eat the outer peels of jicama as it contains a highly toxic compound.

Cultivation of Jicama

Jicama is native to Mexico and South America and this legume has been consumed across Central America for centuries. Spaniards brought jicama from Mexico to the Philippines and from there it spread to China and other parts of South East Asia. It has been cultivated and consumed for dietary and medicinal requirements for a long time.

Jicama plant requires 6-8 months of frost free growth time and so it is mainly cultivated in warm weather. Thus Mexico and its surrounding areas are perfect for cultivating this vegetable. The seeds of this plant grow best in an area that receives minimum 6-8 hours of sunlight per day. Well-drained and alkaline soil is required for this plant.

Popular Health Tips

Zero Calorie Foods

INSTITUTE OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINES
Ayurveda, Delhi

Zero calory foods

Carbohydrate and calorie content of these vegetables are neglidgible and they may be used in any quantity. ( But watch out for visible and added fats like oil , ghee, butter or cream added during preparation of these items)

 

Leafy Vegetables

Other Vegetables

Amaranth ( Chaulai)

Ash gourd

Bathua

Bitter gourd ( Karela)

Brussel Sprouts

Brinjal

Cabbage

Cucumber

Celery

Cauliflower

Coriander leaves ( Dhania)

Cho-cho

Curry leaves ( kada patta)

Drumstick

Fenugreek leaves ( methi saag)

French beans

Lettuce ( salaad)

Knoll-khol

Mint ( pudina)

Lady’s fingers

Rape leaves ( Sarson)

Mango green

Spinach ( Palak)

Onion stalks

Soya leaves

Parwal

 

Plantain flower

 

Pumpkin

 

Radish

 

Rhubarb stalks

 

Snake gourd ( Tori)

 

Tinda

 

Turnip ( shalgam)

Vegetable Exchange

 

Vegetables

Quantity (gms)

Carbohydrate gms

calories

k Cal

Root Vegetables

 

 

 

Beetroot

75

10

50

Carrot

105

10

50

Colocasia

45

10

50

Onion ( big)

90

10

50

Onion (small)

75

10

50

Potato

45

10

50

Sweet potato

30

10

50

Tapioca

30

10

50

Yam (elephant)

60

10

50

Yam

45

10

50

Other Vegetables

 

 

 

Artichoke

60

10

50

Broad Beans

90

10

50

Cluster Beans

90

10

50

Double Beans

50

10

50

Jack tender ( kathal)

105

10

50

Jackfruit seeds

30

10

50

Peas

45

10

50

Plantain green

75

10

50

Water chestnut (Singhara)

45

10

50

 

 

 

Fruit Exchange

 

Fruits

Quantity (gms)

Number or size

Carbohydrate gms

calories

k Cal

Amla

90

20 medium

10

50

Apple

75

1 small

10

50

Banana

30

¼ medium

10

50

Cape gooseberry ( rasbhari)

150

40 small

10

50

Cashew fruit

90

2 small

10

50

Custard apple ( Sharifa)

50

¼

10

50

Dates

30

3

10

50

Figs

135

6 medium

10

50

Grapes

105

20

10

50

Grape fruit

150

½

10

50

Guava

100

1 medium

10

50

Jackfruit

60

3 medium pieces

10

50

Jambu fruits

50

10 big

10

50

Lemon or lime

90

1 medium

10

50

Loquat

105

6 big

10

50

Mango

70

1 small

10

50

Melon

270

¼ medium

10

50

Orange

90

1 small

10

50

Papaya

120

2 medium

10

50

Peach

135

1 medium

10

50

Pear

90

1 medium

10

50

Pineapple

90

1 ½ slice round

10

50

Plum

120

4 medium

10

50

Pomegranate ( Anaar)

75

1 small

10

50

Sapota

50

One

10

50

Strawberry

105

40 small

10

50

Sweet Lime ( Mosambi)

150

1 medium

10

50

Tomato

240

4 medium

10

50

Watermelon

175

¼ small

10

50

Many vegetables that are high in water and fiber content end up being "free" or "almost free." So if you're in the mood for something with crunch, think about these "free" options ("Free" foods, eaten in reasonable quantities, don't have to be journaled; if you like, journal 1 cup of these veggies as 1/2 cup vegetables without added fat):

  • 2 large celery stalks = 13 calories, 1.2 grams fiber
  • 2 cups shredded romaine lettuce = 18 calories, 1.4 grams fiber
  • 1/2 cucumber = 20 calories, 1 gram fiber
  • 1 medium tomato = 25 calories, 1.3 grams fiber
  • 1/2 cup sugar snap peas = 30 calories, 3.4 grams fiber
  • 1 carrot = 30 calories, 2 grams fiber
  • 1 cup jicama sticks = 45 calories, 6 grams fiber
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Top Most Nutrient-Dense Prebiotic Foods

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Top Most Nutrient-Dense Prebiotic Foods

Top most nutrient-dense prebiotic foods
 
1. Asparagus

Asparagus is packed with fiber, folate and other b vitamins, and even have 4 grams of protein per 8 stalks. Eat it grilled, sauteed, raw, or even sneak it in your green smoothie if you're super brave. It has a naturally sweet taste and is also a natural diuretic to beat bloating.

2. Bananas

Almost everyone loves bananas, including your gut! bananas both soothe the gut membrane and also contain natural fibers that promote good bacteria growth. This is one reason they may cause some mild rumbling. For easier digestion, be sure that you choose riper bananas instead of yellowish greenish bananas. Those may be higher in starch and harder to digest, while the spotted ones seem to digest a bit more easy, despite being higher in natural sugars. All bananas are great sources of potassium b vitamins, and even offer vitamin c as well. Use them frozen in smoothies, cream them into a raw pie or cake, or just snack on them raw before your next workout.

3. Onions

The cheapest, most delicious way to flavor your food (and a wonderfully natural one) is also great for your digestion! onions contain a natural source of inulin which the gut uses to clean house and up the good bacteria during the process. Onions are also packed with antioxidants and can be used in any savory recipe you choose. If raw onions give you indigestion, give yours a light saute or boil before using to break down some of the sugars. See these tips for choosing the best onion for your recipes.

4. Garlic

Garlic is a rich source of inulin as well as a great antibacterial agent. It packs two punches in one by kicking out the bad guys and feeding the good guys. Garlic is a cheap way to flavor your foods and also a great source of vitamin b6 to aid in metabolism and nervous system health. It's a real superfood your whole body loves! try it in a veggie stir-fry, hummus, or saute into your next batch of rice or soup.

5. Cabbage

Cabbage is a versatile, cheap prebiotic food you can do almost anything with. Its natural prebiotics are the reason it is used in sauerkraut and kimchi as the base. Feel free to use raw cabbage wraps for sandwiches, make cabbage soup, or make a healthy dairy-free coleslaw if you wish. Cabbage is also packed with b vitamins, alkalizing minerals, and offers up a good source of vitamin c.

6. Beans

Known as a strong digestive booster, beans are packed with oligosaccharides that feed good gut bacteria (which is one reason they're problematic for some). Though the gurgling is a good sign, it can be a little potent for new bean eaters. Soak your beans overnight and cook them extremely well (almost overdone if you need to), or add them slowly into your diet a day so your body can adapt. Beans are a good source of potassium, protein, and high in fiber so work them into your diet if you can, but if not, choose some legumes (below) instead.

7. Legumes

A bit easier to digest than beans, but just as nutritious, legumes such as lentils, chickpeas, and green peas are all excellent choices of protein, iron, and b vitamins. They're filled with just the right amount of fiber and natural sugars to boost good gut bacteria, but a bit lighter on the stomach. For easier digestion, soak your lentils, or use presoaked canned (bpa-free) versions instead. Red lentils are especially thin and easier to digest than other varieties and also a bit sweeter, so you may not need to soak them. Frozen peas are also a good alternative to raw peas and don't need to be soaked either. Edamame and other legumes are also great choices.

8. Bran

Whether it be oat, wheat, rice or another type of bran, pure bran is full of insoluble fiber that feeds good gut bacteria. It helps regularity and also reduces cholesterol. Be sure to choose organic bran when possible to avoid genetically modified grains or go with a company that's certified non-gmo. Oat bran lends a particularly awesome creamy texture to normal oatmeal, but with all grains, be sure you choose mostly whole varieties since the bran is only part of the entire grain. Bran can be added to muffin recipes, porridge, or used in healthy cookie recipes for a creamy, nutty, and fibrous texture.

9. Artichokes

Artichokes are fantastic for your gut! they're packed with fiber and very low in net carbohydrates. This makes them lower on the glycemic index and helpful for your blood sugar. If you choose canned artichoke hearts for ease of use (such as in salads and soups), go with a bpa-free version when possible. Whole artichokes and canned artichoke hearts can both be used in various recipes and are remarkable detox foods.

10. Leeks

Leeks are also another food to add to your list of healthy flavoring options. A member of the onion family, leeks are versatile and easy to cook with, despite looking intimidating. Leeks are commonly used in soups and stocks but can also be cut and sauteed in stir-fries as well. They're rich in the same benefits as onions though a bit milder in taste and higher in chlorophyll.

11. Roasted-veg

Root veggies pack a good bit of soluble fiber that your gut loves. Sweet potatoes, squash, wild yams, jicama, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips, and other root veggies are all great choices. Cook them however you like and enjoy their easy-to-digest, naturally cleansing nature.

 
12. Apples

Apples are fantastic foods for your heat and brain due to their antioxidant content, but their natural pectin fiber is the reason they're so great for your gut. Pectin feeds good bacteria and apples are also a good source of inulin and natural fos (a beneficial type of sugar that feeds the gut). Apples are also good for keeping you full and warding off high cholesterol.

16 people found this helpful

How to quit smoking

Diploma In Family Medicine, M.Sc - Psychotherapy
Sexologist, Pune

Source: Helpguide.org

Whether you’re a teen smoker or a lifetime pack–a–day smoker, quitting can be tough. But the more you learn about your options and prepare for quitting, the easier the process will be. With the right game plan tailored to your needs, you can break the addiction, manage your cravings, and join the millions of people who have kicked the habit for good.

Why quitting smoking can seem so hard

Smoking tobacco is both a physical addiction and a psychological habit. The nicotine from cigarettes provides a temporary, and addictive, high. Eliminating that regular fix of nicotine will cause your body to experience physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Because of nicotine’s “feel good” effect on the brain, you may also have become accustomed to smoking as a way of coping with stress, depression, anxiety, or even boredom.

At the same time, the act of smoking is ingrained as a daily ritual. It may be an automatic response for you to smoke a cigarette with your morning coffee, while taking a break from work or school, or during your commute home at the end of a long day. Perhaps friends, family members, and colleagues smoke, and it has become part of the way you relate with them.

To successfully quit smoking, you’ll need to address both the addiction and the habits and routines that go along with it.

Your Personal Stop Smoking Plan

While some smokers successfully quit by going cold turkey, most people do better with a plan to keep themselves on track. A good plan addresses both the short–term challenge of quitting smoking and the long–term challenge of preventing relapse. It should also be tailored to your specific needs and smoking habits.

Questions to ask yourself

Take the time to think of what kind of smoker you are, which moments of your life call for a cigarette, and why. This will help you to identify which tips, techniques or therapies may be most beneficial for you.

  • Do you feel the need to smoke at every meal?
  • Are you more of a social smoker?
  • Is it a very bad addiction (more than a pack a day)? Or would a simple nicotine patch do the job?
  • Do you reach for cigarettes when you're feeling stressed or down?
  • Are there certain activities, places, or people you associate with smoking?
  • Is your cigarette smoking linked to other addictions, such as alcohol or gambling?
  • Are you open to hypnotherapy and/or acupuncture?
  • Are you someone who is open to talking about your addiction with a therapist or counselor?
  • Are you interested in getting into a fitness program?

Start your stop smoking plan with START

S = Set a quit date.

Choose a date within the next 2 weeks, so you have enough time to prepare without losing your motivation to quit. If you mainly smoke at work, quit on the weekend, so you have a few days to adjust to the change.

T = Tell family, friends, and co-workers that you plan to quit.

Let your friends and family in on your plan to quit smoking and tell them you need their support and encouragement to stop. Look for a quit buddy who wants to stop smoking as well. You can help each other get through the rough times.

A = Anticipate and plan for the challenges you'll face while quitting.

Most people who begin smoking again do so within the first 3 months. You can help yourself make it through by preparing ahead for common challenges, such as nicotine withdrawal and cigarette cravings.

R = Remove cigarettes and other tobacco products from your home, car, and work.

Throw away all of your cigarettes (no emergency pack!), lighters, ashtrays, and matches. Wash your clothes and freshen up anything that smells like smoke. Shampoo your car, clean your drapes and carpet, and steam your furniture.

T = Talk to your doctor about getting help to quit.

Your doctor can prescribe medication to help with withdrawal and suggest other alternatives. If you can't see a doctor, you can get many products over the counter at your local pharmacy or grocery store, including the nicotine patch, nicotine lozenges, and nicotine gum.

How to quit smoking: Identify your smoking triggers

One of the best things you can do to help yourself quit is to identify the things that make you want to smoke, including specific situations, activities, feelings, and people.

Keep a craving journal

A craving journal can help you zero in on your patterns and triggers. For a week or so leading up to your quit date, keep a log of your smoking. Note the moments in each day when you crave a cigarette:

  • What time was it?
  • How intense was the craving (on a scale of 1-10)?
  • What were you doing?
  • Who were you with?
  • How were you feeling?
  • How did you feel after smoking?

Do you smoke to relieve unpleasant or overwhelming feelings?

Managing unpleasant feelings such as stress, depression, loneliness, fear, and anxiety are some of the most common reasons why adults smoke. When you have a bad day, it can seem like cigarettes are your only friend. As much comfort as cigarettes provide, though, it's important to remember that there are healthier (and more effective) ways to keep unpleasant feelings in check. These may include exercising, meditating, using sensory relaxation strategies, and practicing simple breathing exercises.

For many people, an important aspect of quitting smoking is to find alternate ways to handle these difficult feelings without smoking. Even when cigarettes are no longer a part of your life, the painful and unpleasant feelings that may have prompted you to smoke in the past will still remain. So, it's worth spending some time thinking about the different ways you intend to deal with stressful situations and the daily irritations that would normally have you reaching for a cigarette.

Tips for avoiding common smoking triggers

  • Alcohol. Many people have a habit of smoking when they drink. TIP: switch to non-alcoholic drinks or drink only in places where smoking inside is prohibited. Alternatively, try snacking on nuts and chips, or chewing on a straw or cocktail stick.
  • Other smokers. When friends, family, and co-workers smoke around you, it is doubly difficult to quit or avoid relapse. TIP: Your social circles need to know that you are changing your habits so talk about your decision to quit. Let them know they won't be able to smoke when you're in the car with them or taking a coffee break together. In your workplace, don't take all your coffee breaks with smokers only, do something else instead, or find non-smokers to have your breaks with.
  • End of a meal. For some smokers, ending a meal means lighting up, and the prospect of giving that up may appear daunting. TIP: replace that moment after a meal with something such as a piece of fruit, a (healthy) dessert, a square of chocolate, or a stick of gum.

How to quit smoking: Coping with nicotine withdrawal symptoms

Once you stop smoking, you will experience a number of physical symptoms as your body withdraws from nicotine. Nicotine withdrawal begins quickly, usually starting within thirty minutes to an hour of the last cigarette and peaking about 2 to 3 days later. Withdrawal symptoms can last for a few days to several weeks and differ from person to person.

Common nicotine withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Cigarette cravings
  • Irritability, frustration, or anger
  • Anxiety or nervousness
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Restlessness
  • Increased appetite
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Tremors
  • Increased coughing
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation or upset stomach
  • Depression
  • Decreased heart rate

Unpleasant as these withdrawal symptoms may be, they are only temporary. They will get better in a few weeks as the toxins are flushed from your body. In the meantime, let your friends and family know that you won't be your usual self and ask for their understanding.

Coping with Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Symptom

Duration

Relief

Craving for cigarette

Most intense during first week but can linger for months

Wait out the urge; distract yourself; take a brisk walk.

Irritability, impatience

Two to four weeks

Exercise; take hot baths; use relaxation techniques; avoid caffeine.

Insomnia

Two to four weeks

Avoid caffeine after 6 p.m.; use relaxation techniques; exercise; plan activities (such as reading) when sleep is difficult.

Fatigue

Two to four weeks

Take naps; do not push yourself.

Lack of concentration

A few weeks

Reduce workload; avoid stress.

Hunger

Several weeks or longer

Drink water or low-calorie drinks; eat low-calorie snacks.

Coughing, dry throat, nasal drip

Several weeks

Drink plenty of fluids; use cough drops.

Constipation, gas

One to two weeks

Drink plenty of fluids; add fiber to diet; exercise.

Adapted with permission from Overcoming Addiction: Paths Toward Recovery, a special health report from Harvard Health Publications.

How to quit smoking: Manage cigarette cravings

Avoiding smoking triggers will help reduce the urge to smoke, but you can't avoid cravings entirely. But cigarette cravings don't last long, so if you're tempted to light up, remember that the craving will pass and try to wait it out. It also helps to be prepared in advance. Having a plan to cope with cravings will help keep you from giving in.

  • Distract yourself. Do the dishes, turn on the TV, take a shower, or call a friend. The activity doesn't matter as long as it gets your mind off of smoking.
  • Remind yourself why you quit. Focus on your reasons for quitting, including the health benefits, improved appearance, money you're saving, and enhanced self-esteem.
  • Get out of a tempting situation. Where you are or what you're doing may be triggering the craving. If so, a change of scenery can make all the difference.
  • Reward yourself. Reinforce your victories. Whenever you triumph over a craving, give yourself a reward to keep yourself motivated.

Coping with Cigarette Cravings in the Moment

Find an oral substitute

Keep other things around to pop in your mouth when cravings hit. Good choices include mints, hard candy, carrot or celery sticks, gum, and sunflower seeds.

Keep your mind busy

Read a book or magazine, listen to some music you love, do a crossword or Sudoku puzzle, or play an online game.

Keep your hands busy

Squeeze balls, pencils, or paper clips are good substitutes to satisfy that need for tactile stimulation.

Brush your teeth

The just–brushed, clean feeling can help get rid of cigarette cravings.

Drink water

Slowly drink a large, cold glass of water. Not only will it help the craving pass, but staying hydrated helps minimize the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal.

Light something else

Instead of lighting a cigarette, light a candle or some incense.

Get active

Go for a walk, do some jumping jacks or pushups, try some yoga stretches, or run around the block.

Try to relax

Do something that calms you down, such as taking a warm bath, meditating, reading a book, or practicing deep breathing exercises.

Preventing weight gain after you’ve stopped smoking

Weight gain is a common concern when quitting smoking. Some people even use it as a reason not to quit. While it's true that many smokers put on weight within six months of stopping smoking, the gain is usually small—about 5 pounds on average—and that initial gain decreases over time. It’s also important to remember that carrying a few extra pounds for a few months won’t hurt your heart as much as smoking will. Of course, gaining weight is NOT inevitable when you quit smoking.

Smoking acts as an appetite suppressant. It also dampens your sense of smell and taste. So after you quit, your appetite will likely increase and food will seem more appealing. Weight gain can also happen if you replace the oral gratification of smoking with eating, especially if you turn to unhealthy comfort foods. So it's important to find other, healthy ways to deal with stress and other unpleasant feelings rather than mindless, emotional eating.

  • Nurture yourself. Instead of turning to cigarettes or food when you feel stressed, anxious, or depressed, learn new ways to soothe yourself.
  • Eat healthy, varied meals. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and limit your fat intake. Seek out low-fat options that look appetizing to you and you will actually eat. Avoid alcohol, sugary sodas, and other high-calorie drinks.
  • Drink lots of water. Drinking lots of water—at least six to eight 8 oz. glasses—will help you feel full and keep you from eating when you're not hungry. Water will also help flush toxins from your body.
  • Take a walk. Walking is a great form of exercise. Not only will it help you burn calories and keep the weight off, but it will also help alleviate feelings of stress and frustration that accompany smoking withdrawal.
  • Snack on low-calorie or calorie-free foods. Good choices include sugar-free gum, carrot and celery sticks, sliced bell peppers or jicama, or sugar-free hard candies.

Medication and therapy to help you quit smoking

There are many different methods that have successfully helped people to quit smoking, including:

  • Quitting smoking cold turkey.
  • Systematically decreasing the number of cigarettes you smoke.
  • Reducing your intake of nicotine gradually over time.
  • Using nicotine replacement therapy or non-nicotine medications to reduce withdrawal symptoms.
  • Utilizing nicotine support groups.
  • Trying hypnosis, acupuncture, or counseling using cognitive behavioral techniques.

You may be successful with the first method you try. More likely, you’ll have to try a number of different methods or a combination of treatments to find the ones that work best for you.

Medications to help you stop smoking

Smoking cessation medications can ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings, and are most effective when used as part of a comprehensive stop smoking program monitored by your physician. Talk to your doctor about your options and whether an anti-smoking medication is right for you. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved options are:

Nicotine replacement therapy. Nicotine replacement therapy involves "replacing" cigarettes with other nicotine substitutes, such as nicotine gum or a nicotine patch. It works by delivering small and steady doses of nicotine into the body to relieve some of the withdrawal symptoms without the tars and poisonous gases found in cigarettes. This type of treatment helps smokers focus on breaking their psychological addiction and makes it easier to concentrate on learning new behaviors and coping skills.

Non-nicotine medication. These medications help you stop smoking by reducing cravings and withdrawal symptoms without the use of nicotine. Medications such as bupropion (Zyban) and varenicline (Chantix) are intended for short-term use only.

Alternative therapies to help you stop smoking

There are several things you can do to stop smoking that don’t involve nicotine replacement therapy or prescription medications: Ask your doctor for a referral or see Resources and References below for help finding qualified professionals in each area.

  • Hypnosis A popular option that has produced good results. Forget anything you may have seen from stage hypnotists, hypnosis works by getting you into a deeply relaxed state where you are open to suggestions that strengthen your resolve to quit smoking and increase your negative feelings toward cigarettes.
  • Acupuncture One of the oldest known medical techniques, acupuncture is believed to work by triggering the release of endorphins (natural pain relievers) that allow the body to relax. As a smoking cessation aid, acupuncture can be helpful in managing smoking withdrawal symptoms.
  • Behavioral Therapy Nicotine addiction is related to the habitual behaviors (the “rituals”) involved in smoking. Behavior therapy focuses on learning new coping skills and breaking those habits.
  • Motivational Therapies Self-help books and websites can provide a number of ways to motivate yourself to quit smoking. One well known example is calculating the monetary savings. Some people have been able to find the motivation to quit just by calculating how much money they will save. It may be enough to pay for a summer vacation.

Smokeless or spit tobacco is NOT a healthy alternative to smoking

Smokeless tobacco, otherwise known as spit tobacco, is not a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes. It contains the same addictive chemical, nicotine, contained in cigarettes. In fact, the amount of nicotine absorbed from smokeless tobacco can be 3 to 4 times the amount delivered by a cigarette.

What to do if you slip or relapse

Most people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good, so don't beat yourself up if you start smoking again. Turn the relapse into a rebound by learning from your mistake. Analyze what happened right before you started smoking again, identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into, and make a new stop-smoking plan that eliminates them.

It's also important to emphasize the difference between a slip and a relapse. If you slip up and smoke a cigarette, it doesn't mean that you can't get back on the wagon. You can choose to learn from the slip and let it motivate you to try harder or you can use it as an excuse to go back to your smoking habit. But the choice is yours. A slip doesn't have to turn into a full-blown relapse.

I started smoking again, now what?

Having a small setback doesn’t mean you’re a smoker again. Most people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good. Identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into and learn from your mistakes.  

  • You’re not a failure if you slip up. It doesn't mean you can't quit for good.
  • Don’t let a slip become a mudslide. Throw out the rest of the pack. It's important to get back on the non-smoking track now.
  • Look back at your quit log and feel good about the time you went without smoking.
  • Find the trigger. Exactly what was it that made you smoke again? Decide how you will cope with that issue the next time it comes up.
  • Learn from your experience. What has been most helpful? What didn’t work? 
  • Are you using a medicine to help you quit? Call your doctor if you start smoking again. Some medicines cannot be used if you are smoking at the same time.
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Table of Content

Jicama
Nutritional Value of Jicama
Health Benefits of Jicama
Helps the formation of good bacteria
Helps in digestion
Regulates blood pressure
Good for your brain
Helps you lose weight
Reduces the risk of cardiovascular problems
Helps to improve blood circulation
Improves your mood
Keep our bones healthy
Strengthens our immune system
Uses of Jicama
Side-Effects & Allergies of Jicama
Cultivation of Jicama