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Overview

Benefits of Triticale And Its Side Effects

The health benefits of triticale are such that it helps to control diabetes, reduces digestion problems, helps in proper circulation of blood, optimizes body’s metabolic activity, reduces oxidative stress, promotes Bone Health, has antioxidant Nature, rich in minerals, reduces neural problems, increases cell production, have high folate content, helps in weight control.

Benefits of Triticale And Its Side Effects

Table of Content

Triticale
Nutritional Value of Triticale
Health Benefits of Triticale
Helps to control diabetes
Helps in reducing digestion problems
Helps in proper circulation of blood
Helps in optimization of body’s metabolic activity
Helps in reducing oxidative stress
Promotes Bone Health
Antioxidant Nature
Rich in Minerals
Reduces Neural Problems
Helps in increasing cell production
Have high folate content
Helps in weight control
Uses of Triticale
Side-Effects & Allergies of Triticale
Cultivation of Triticale

Triticale

Triticale is a hybrid of wheat (Triticum) and rye (Secale) and was first bred in laboratories during the late 19th century in Scotland and Germany. Commercially available triticale is almost always a second-generation hybrid, i.e., a cross between two kinds of primary triticales. Triticale combines the yield potential and grain quality of wheat with the disease and environmental tolerance (including soil conditions) of rye. Only recently has it been developed into a commercially viable crop. Depending on the cultivar, triticale can more or less resemble either of its parents. It is grown mostly for forage or fodder, although some triticale-based foods can be purchased at health food stores and can be found in some breakfast cereals.

Nutritional Value of Triticale

Every 100 g of Triticale contains 336 calories of energy, 2.09 grams of total fat ( out of which saturated fatty acids is 0.366 g, monounsaturated fatty acids is 0.211 g and polyunsaturated fatty acids is 0.913 g), carbohydrate is 72 mg, protein is 13 mg, folate is 73.00 mcg, niacin is 1.430 mg, Pantothenic acid is 1.323 mg, Riboflavin is 0.134 mg, Thiamine is 0.416 mg, Vitamin B6 is 0.138 mg, Vitamin E is 0.90 mg, Alpha Tocopherol is 0.90 mg, Calcium is 37.00 mg, Copper is 0.457 mg, Iron is 2.57 mg, Magnesium is 130.00 mg, Manganese is 3.210 mg, Phosphorus is 358.00 mg, Potassium is 332.00 mg, Sodium is 5.00 mg and Zinc is 3.45 mg.

Health Benefits of Triticale

Mentioned below are the best health benefits of Triticale
Health Benefits of Triticale

Helps to control diabetes

High fibre content in Triticale can help to keep the sugar levels in the blood in check. Triticale is also rich in the mineral manganese. Manganese is a mineral that assists a lot in converting the sugar level in the blood into energy and this is something which is highly required by a diabetic person. Therefore inclusion of Triticale as a part of diet by the patients of diabetes can be very much helpful.

Helps in reducing digestion problems

In present day, proper digestion of food has become a dream for many of the people and this is because of the improper quality of food they intake. However if food isn’t digested well, it can lead to several other issues as well. Triticale is a crop which has high amount of fibre content in it that is highly essential for the proper digestion of food on the whole.

Helps in proper circulation of blood

The circulatory system of the body plays an important role in the proper body building process and the organ maintenance as well and therefore it is highly essential for a person to maintain proper health conditions of the circulatory system and triticale has all the essential nutrients that can keep the health condition of the circulatory system in sound.

Helps in optimization of body’s metabolic activity

Triticale is one such crop that is highly responsible for energy production through fibre and this can be helpful in optimizing the metabolism process in an individual and also has the potential to improve the cell development as well.

Helps in reducing oxidative stress

Triticale is rich in manganese content and this mineral is vital to the body as it assists a lot in maintaining the stress levels under control and therefore triticale can be considered as a perfect diet remedy for the ones who are actually suffering from asthma.

Promotes Bone Health

Triticale is indeed a rich source of many of the minerals that are vital for maintaining the body health and these minerals include calcium, zinc etc. These minerals can be regarded as the most essential ones because they are actually responsible for maintaining the health of the bones or skeletal system in sound condition.

Antioxidant Nature

Triticale crop is said to possess with some high amounts of antioxidant properties and these antioxidants are responsible for eliminating the free radicals on the whole within the body.

Rich in Minerals

Triticale is one such crop that is highly rich in minerals and it must not be forgotten that this particular crop can be helpful in maintaining the functioning of the entire body in a healthy state.

Reduces Neural Problems

There are high amounts of B complex vitamins or folates that are present in the triticale crop and all these ones can be regarded as the perfect remedies for handling neural tube defects quite effectively.

Helps in increasing cell production

Along with fibre, triticale has a high content of protein than either wheat or rye. This means that cell production throughout the body can be increased, metabolic and enzymatic processes can be optimized, and general body functions can be more efficient. Proteins are the building blocks of cells, as they can be broken down into their component amino acids and then re-structure into whatever materials our body needs in order to stay healthy. Along with protein, triticale also contains manganese, folic acid, and a number of other nutritional elements that are essential for cell production.

Have high folate content

Consumption of triticale provides an individual with plenty of folate. In fact it contains around double the amount of folate found in wheat and around three times the amount compared with rye. Folate plays a number of essential roles in the body. It is vital for red blood cell production as well as the production of new cells throughout the body. Folate is especially essential for women who are pregnant or trying to have a child and a deficiency is linked with birth abnormalities. It is also very important for growing children and teenagers who are going through a growth spurt.

Helps in weight control

Being so high in dietary fibre and low in fats, Triticale is a good option for people looking to shed a few pounds. Dietary fibre can help to feel fuller for longer and reduces the desire to snack throughout the day. In the long term, this can result in weight loss especially if a person incorporates the grain into his or her daily balanced diet and exercise regime.

Uses of Triticale

Being a good source of many vital nutrients, triticale is used as breakfast cereal. Flour from triticale is used in making breads and other bakery items. It is also used as forage and silage crops, as an animal feed, as a winter grazing crop.

Side-Effects & Allergies of Triticale

Triticale, like wheat and rye, contain high levels of gluten, so those who suffer from gluten intolerance or allergies, such as Celiac disease, should avoid triticale and try other non-gluten health cereals that won’t cause severe allergic reactions and gastrointestinal trouble.

Cultivation of Triticale

In 1875, for the first time triticale is mentioned in a report of the Scottish botanist A. Stephen Wilson who succeeded in pollinating wheat with rye pollen. He was lucky to raise just two plants which as a matter of fact were sterile so that further multiplication was not possible. In 1883, the American Elbert S. Carmann successfully grew a real hybrid from a cross between wheat and rye. In 1888, the famous German plant breeder Wilhelm Rimpau managed to create a cross between wheat and rye. One of the four grains which he was able to harvest was fertile. The plant grown from it yielded 12 germinating kernels, and Rimpau was successful in multiplying them, but without economic success. In 1921, in Russia, G. K. Meister in his breeding fields observed spontaneous pollinations of wheat plants with rye pollens from neighbouring plots. In 1973, in France, the technique to double the set of chromosomes by the use of colchicines was developed which came into use with many crops and which opened new possibilities in triticale breeding. In 1968, in Hungary, the first promising triticale variety (BOKOLO) was released officially, but which finally did not yield as high as expected. In the same year Tadeusz Wolski started his own triticale breeding programme, and laid the foundation stone for the success of triticale in Europe and many other countries in the whole world.

Popular Questions & Answers

What r the whole grain food. Is brown rice whole grain. Is this good for consume in break fast for weight loss?

B.Sc.(Hons), P.G.Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Gurgaon
Rice growing in fields and paddies has three edible parts – the bran, the germ, and the endosperm – just like all other whole grains. Most of us think of “brown rice” as being synonymous with whole grain rice, but in fact whole grain rice can be many different colors, depending on the variety of rice. Avoid eating rice at breakfast. If you want to loose weight then start having fibre in you breakfast, eat fruits, drink plenty of water. Rest for a proper balanced diet chart, you can contact us or provide your details too.
1 person found this helpful

I have got multiple sclerosis. Could you help me by telling me about the diet requirements for an Ms. patient.

MBBS, cc USG
General Physician, Gurgaon
The development of MS has been associated with: a. an increased presence of antigliadin antibodies typical of gluten intolerance. b. low blood levels of vitamin D. c. low blood levels of antioxidants. d. high intakes of saturated fat so better to avoid high in animal fat or saturated fat Take gluten-free diet, which eliminates all wheat, rye, barley, and triticale foods, take diet rich in antioxidants consult for further guidance
1 person found this helpful

Tell me any Natural substitute products like egg, milk, horlicks etc instead of kabipro vanilla powder.

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist,
Milks • Soymilk: Of all the dairy-free milk alternatives, soymilk is likely the most recognizable to your clients and also the most widely available in grocery stores today. “Like rice milk, soymilk isn’t technically a milk; it’s a liquid extract of soybeans,” Levy explains. “Since it doesn’t contain any lactose, soymilk often is used as a substitute for people with lactose intolerance. And, because it’s derived from a plant source, it’s also a popular cow’s milk substitute.” Soymilk also gets good marks for healthfulness, especially for its protein content. “Soymilk contains the most protein of all the nondairy alternatives, with [6 to] 10 g per cup,” Batayneh says. “It also contains omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. And most are fortified with calcium, riboflavin, and vitamins A, D, and B12.” “Notably, soyfoods are the only plant-based complete protein source and are therefore the preferred dairy substitute,” and they’re vegan friendly, adds Levy, noting that soymilk is also a good source of manganese and magnesium. Various soymilk brands are available at grocery chains and health food stores nationwide, with Silk and Earth Balance being two popular choices. For clients looking to save a buck, have them keep an eye out for grocery store chain brands, such as those from Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods Market. Soymilk, like most other dairy-free milks, comes in unsweetened and sweetened varieties, but Batayneh suggests choosing “the unsweetened version for a smaller sugar hit.” • Rice milk: Rice milk, made from boiled rice, brown rice syrup, and brown rice starch, is another popular alternative for clients suffering from lactose intolerance, Levy says. “Rice milk generally tastes sweeter than cow’s milk, owing to the addition of sweeteners and vanilla in order to make it taste more like cow’s milk,” he says. Compared with dairy milk, the rice variety has considerably less protein (only 1 g) and a very small amount of natural calcium, though most brands are calcium fortified and enriched with vitamins A, D, and B12. “It’s also much higher in carbohydrates, with 24 g,” Batayneh says. “On the plus side, it’s probably the most hypoallergenic of all dairy alternatives.” Rice milk comes in plain, vanilla, and chocolate varieties and can be found at most major grocery stores and health food stores, especially organic grocery stores, though Levy warns of its higher price tag. Have clients test out brands until they find one with a taste and texture they prefer, though Dority says Rice Dream is generally a well-liked and commercially available brand. • Potato milk: Potato milk is one of the newer dairy-free milk alternatives and therefore more difficult to find commercially than rice or soymilks, Dority says. “It appears to be most commonly sold in powdered form,” she says. Like rice milk, potato milk is high in carbohydrates but low in protein, though it’s usually fortified with calcium and vitamins. It’s also gluten and casein free. “Made from just potatoes and water, it’s suitable for those on a gluten-free diet,” Batayneh says. Since it’s a new kid on the dairy-free block, Batayneh suggests clients look for it on the Internet (it’s mostly available via websites), though she notes it tends to be expensive. • Almond milk: Almond milk, another alternative, is made from ground almonds, water, and a small amount of sweetener. And while it can be formulated to have a taste and texture similar to cow’s milk, Levy says it’s lacking in many of the nutritive qualities. “Almond milk is much less calorically dense, typically containing only about a third of the calories of 2% cow’s milk,” he says. “Moreover, it contains very little protein, and almond milk is devoid of most B vitamins, lacks many essential trace elements, including zinc and copper, and contains little, if any, of the essential fatty acids.” Because of this, Levy says it should be used accordingly, noting it may not be appropriate for parents shopping for a milk substitute for infant formulas. However, Batayneh says many of her clients find the taste of almond milk more enjoyable than other substitutes, and it can be found in most grocery stores and health food stores in the refrigerated and nonrefrigerated sections. “A unique aspect of the nutritional profile of almond milk is that 1 cup of almond milk may contain roughly 50% of the DV [Daily Value] for vitamin E,” says Dority, noting that Almond Breeze is one popular and commercially available brand. • Oat, hemp, and coconut milks: Oat milk, which is made from oat groats, water, and potentially other grains and beans, such as triticale, barley, brown rice, and soybeans, has a mild flavor and is slightly sweet, which makes it a good substitute for low-fat or skim milk, according to Dority. Low in overall calories, cholesterol, and saturated fat, it’s high in fiber and iron and contains both vitamin E and folic acid, says Batayneh, who cautions against its use by clients with a gluten sensitivity. Hemp milk, typically made from hulled hemp seeds, water, and a sweetener, contains higher amounts of protein and omega-3 fatty acids but lacks calcium. “It’s a good alternative for those with gluten, nut, and soy allergies,” Batayneh says, though it’s not widely available. “Coconut milk is higher in calories and fat than most milk or milk alternatives, and it contains fiber and iron, two notable differences in the nutritional profile compared to cow’s milk,” says Dority, who cautions that its strong flavor may limit its use for some clients. “Coconut milk contains 5 g of saturated fat per serving, but research has shown that the specific saturated fats in coconut oil may actually be beneficial,” Batayneh says. For dairy-free clients who are cooking aficionados, Batayneh says almond and coconut milks are generally best for baking “because their nutty flavors blend well with the sweetness in baking.” She recommends soymilk for savory dishes, “especially Asian ones, because it can leave a slightly ‘beany’ taste.” She cautions against using rice milk in recipes due to its watery texture. Cheeses • Cream cheese: There are numerous soy cream cheeses on the market, which tend to be the most popular dairy-free versions, including those made by Tofutti, Galaxy Nutritional Foods, and Trader Joe’s. According to Batayneh, these soy-based varieties have similar tastes and textures to regular cream cheese, which is why consumers like them, but they also can be more processed, as many contain thickeners such as maltodextrin. “There are recipes for homemade versions, like almond cream cheese,” she says, for clients with the time and initiative to try making their own varieties. • Sour cream: Soy-based sour creams are the most widely available dairy-free alternative to sour cream, though clients likely will have to go to a health food store to find them. Batayneh says Tofutti, Galaxy Nutritional Foods, and Moonomor all make soy-based sour creams. Dority likes Tofutti’s version due to its taste and texture. “Other varieties are harder to find, but there are many recipes for homemade dairy-free sour cream, and most are cashew based.” • Regular cheese: “Due to the various sensory characteristics associated with cheese, it appears that dairy-free cheese is the most difficult to substitute,” says Dority, adding that dairy-free cheeses often don’t mimic the mouthfeel, taste, and meltability of dairy cheeses. Soy cheeses tend to be the most common and widely available. “Brands such as Teese, Sheese, and Vegan Gourmet are popular choices and have received good reviews,” Batayneh says. For clients with other food allergies, she recommends Daiya cheeses. “Daiya makes a variety of cheeses, from cheddar and pepperjack to mozzarella and havarti. Daiya cheeses are soy, dairy, gluten, and nut free, making them a great choice for those with allergies.” For another alternative, Dr. Cow makes nut-based cheeses using cashews and macadamia nuts. “These can be found in health food stores and some major grocery stores as well as bought online,” Batayneh says. Desserts • Ice cream: Dority says rice-based ice creams are a popular alternative due to their sweetness, noting that Rice Dream is a popular brand. “Soy-based ice cream also is easy to find in stores,” she says. Batayneh’s pick for a nondairy sweet treat is NadaMoo! “It’s made with coconut milk and agave,” she says. In addition to being dairy free, this brand is also organic, gluten free, vegan, and fair trade. “Compared to other varieties, NadaMoo! has fewer calories and grams of sugar per serving.” So Delicious offers soy, almond, and coconut milk-based ice creams, available in various flavors and chocolate-covered ice cream and fudge bars (with a mini version with fewer calories). Those on a dairy-free diet also can enjoy most sorbets and fruit-based icy treats that are naturally dairy free. • Whipped cream: Batayneh says the market for dairy-free whipped cream is relatively small, so clients will have to go to health food stores to find it. She says Soyatoo! Whip Topping is a popular soy- and rice-based variety, and MimicCreme Healthy Top Whipping Cream is a good nut-based alternative. Rich Whip Non-Dairy Whip Topping is another whipped cream alternative for clients going dairy free. However, just because they’re free of dairy doesn’t mean they’re necessarily the best options for clients. “These options are all relatively processed, and Rich Whip contains high fructose corn syrup and partially hydrogenated oil,” Batayneh says. For a less processed topping for a slice of summer peach pie, suggest clients make their own. “A popular alternative is making homemade whipped cream using coconut milk,” says Dority, who refers clients to the Internet for coconut-, almond-, or cashew-based whipped cream recipes. • Cheesecake and other sweets: Dairy-free cheesecakes can be difficult to find in stores, Batayneh says, so she directs clients to specialty bakeries, which may be more likely to carry them. There are also several online retailers offering dairy-free cheesecakes, including The Raw Vegan and Vegan Essentials. “Earth Café, which is sold at Whole Foods Market and Vitamin Cottage as well as a few other natural health food stores, also makes a line of vegan, gluten-free cheesecakes in addition to other desserts,” Batayneh adds. There are numerous specialty bakeries that make vegan and otherwise dairy-free sweets, and many ship nationwide. Isabella’s Cookie Company is one such bakery that offers vegan cookie options. Snacks • Yogurts: Soy-, coconut-, and nut-based yogurts all can be found in major grocery stores and health food stores, with soy-based versions being the most readily available. Batayneh’s favorite varieties include WholeSoy & Co, which she says comes in 12 flavors and tastes similar to regular yogurt. “It also contains vegan probiotics,” she says. She also likes Nu Lait Dairy Free Yogurt, which is coconut or almond based and soy, gluten, and allergen free. • Smoothies: Major smoothie brands, including Odwalla and Naked, carry dairy-free products, so Batayneh tells clients to look for Odwalla Smoothie Refreshers and Naked Oat Smoothies to quench their thirst sans dairy. These typically can be found at grocery stores and health food stores nationwide. For homemade smoothies, Dority says rice milk has a natural (or added) sweetness that tends to complement the other ingredients in a smoothie. “Depending on the additional ingredients, both coconut and almond milk might provide a unique flavor. Spreads • Butter: For dairy-free butter spreads, various soy-based options are available. Batayneh says Earth Balance is likely the most well known and widely available. “They offer a variety of spreads, including original, olive oil, soy free, soy garden, and whipped. All are vegan, gluten free, trans fat free, non-GMO, and made with expeller-pressed oils.” Clients who like the taste of Earth Balance may like its butter sticks, which are especially useful for baking. “Smart Balance also makes spreadable butters made with a ‘natural oil blend’ of palm fruit, canola, soybean, and olive oils,” Batayneh says. “Smart Balance products contain omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins A and E, and are free of trans fats and gluten.” For clients who want a texture similar to real butter and don’t mind a slightly nutty undertone, coconut and cashew butters, such as those made by Nutiva and Artisana, may be good choices for them. • Margarines: Different kinds of dairy-free margarine options are available, though not all are equal in nutritional value. Mother’s Margarine and Fleischmann’s Light are two options, but Batayneh cautions that some dairy-free margarines can contain trans fats, so make sure clients read food labels before buying them. One variety that has no trans fats is Earth Balance’s Organic Coconut Spread, which Batayneh says tastes similar to margarine and is also soy free.

I am allergic to gluten what all are the diet restrictions I need to follow in detail please answer also a detailed diet chart would do.

M. Sc. Foods, Nutrition & Dietetics, B.Sc-Home Science
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Visakhapatnam
A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, and a cross between wheat and rye called triticale. A gluten-free diet is primarily used to treat celiac disease. Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications. Allowed foods Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free: Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form Fresh eggs Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated) Fruits and vegetables Most dairy products It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet, such as: Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Corn and cornmeal Flax Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean) Hominy (corn) Millet Quinoa Rice Sorghum Soy Tapioca Teff Always avoid Avoid all food and drinks containing: Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley) Rye Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye) Wheat Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are other wheat products to avoid: Durum flour Farina Graham flour Kamut Semolina Spelt Avoid unless labeled'gluten-free' In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain: Beer Breads Cakes and pies Candies Cereals Communion wafers Cookies and crackers Croutons French fries Gravies Imitation meat or seafood Matzo Pastas Processed luncheon meats Salad dressings Sauces, including soy sauce Seasoned rice mixes Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips Self-basting poultry Soups and soup bases Vegetables in sauce.
6 people found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

Food To Eat And Avoid In Celiac Disease!

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai

Allowed foods in celiac disease are: 

Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free:

  • Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form
  • Fresh eggs
  • Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated)
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Most dairy products

It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet, such as:

  • Amaranth
  • Arrowroot
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn and cornmeal
  • Flax
  • Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean)
  • Hominy (corn)
  • Millet
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Sorghum
  • Soy
  • Tapioca
  • Teff 


Always avoid these foods with celiac: 

Avoid all food and drinks containing:

  • Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
  • Rye
  • Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
  • Wheat

Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. 

Here are other wheat products to avoid:

  • Durum flour
  • Farina
  • Graham flour
  • Kamut
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Avoid unless labeled'gluten-free'

In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain:

  • Beer
  • Breads
  • Cakes and pies
  • Candies
  • Cereals
  • Communion wafers
  • Cookies and crackers
  • Croutons
  • French fries
  • Gravies
  • Imitation meat or seafood
  • Matzo
  • Pastas
  • Processed luncheon meats
  • Salad dressings
  • Sauces, including soy sauce
  • Seasoned rice mixes
  • Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
  • Self-basting poultry
  • Soups and soup bases
  • Vegetables in sauce

Certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free.

You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include:

Food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others
Medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent.

2 people found this helpful

Gluten Free Diet

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Gluten Free Diet

Allowed foods - Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free like beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form fresh eggs, fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated), Fruits and vegetables, most dairy products. It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet such as: amaranth arrowroot buckwheat corn and cornmeal flax, gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean), hominy (corn). Millet quinoa rice, sorghum Soy, tapioca Ttff needs to be avoided.  Avoid all food and drinks containing: barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley), rye Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye), wheat. Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are other wheat products to avoid: durum flour, farina graham flour, kamut semolina spelt avoid unless labeled'gluten-free'. In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain. Beer, breads, cakes and pies, candies and cereals, communion wafers, cookies and crackers, croutons French fries, gravies imitation meat or seafood Matzo, pastas, processed luncheon meats, salad dressing sauces, including soy sauce, seasoned rice mixes, seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips, self-basting poultry Soups and soup bases Vegetables in sauce, certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free. You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include: food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent.

13 people found this helpful

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Besan or gram flour has health benefits

If you are in doubt that your food may be the cause of your illness, try substituting one food each day. To begin with, its best to use besan (gram flour) in place of wheat flour .
People suffering from celiac disease cannot digest a protein called gluten, which is found in barley and wheat flour. Gluten triggers immune system in patients to damage small intestine villi. As a result, patients cannot absorb nutrients from food and remain malnourished, which could lead to anemia, weight loss and fatigue. Celiac disease patients suffer from fat malabsorption.

A gluten-free diet is also recommended for patients with wheat allergy, dermatitis herpetiformis; multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders, autism spectrum disorders, ADHD, and some behavioral problems. Gluten-containing cereals are wheat, barley, rye, oats and triticale. Gluten is also present as a food additive in the form of a flavoring, stabilizing or thickening agent.

In these conditions one should switch over to gluten-free foods. The best alternative is to shift from wheat flour to gram flour (besan).

Table of Content

Triticale
Nutritional Value of Triticale
Health Benefits of Triticale
Helps to control diabetes
Helps in reducing digestion problems
Helps in proper circulation of blood
Helps in optimization of body’s metabolic activity
Helps in reducing oxidative stress
Promotes Bone Health
Antioxidant Nature
Rich in Minerals
Reduces Neural Problems
Helps in increasing cell production
Have high folate content
Helps in weight control
Uses of Triticale
Side-Effects & Allergies of Triticale
Cultivation of Triticale