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Overview

Benefits of Arugula And Its Side Effects

Arugula provides a host of health benefits. Arugula reduces risk of cancer, improves eyesight and provides you with healthy bones. Other major benfits of consuming arugula include strengthening the brain, improving metabolic functions, helping absorption of minerals in the body and boosting the immune system.

Benefits of Arugula And Its Side Effects

Table of Content

Arugula
Nutritional Value of Arugula
Health Benefits of Arugula
Detoxification of body
Fights cancer
Eye protection
Good for the bones
Strengthens the Immune System
Good for expecting mothers
Helps to fight diabetes
Enhances metabolism
Helps absorption of minerals
Enhances athletic performance
Helps with weight loss
Uses of Arugula
Side-Effects & Allergies of Arugula
Cultivation of Arugula

Arugula

Arugula belonging to the genus Eruca and the family Brassicaceae is a leafy green plant that is closely related to radishes, kale and cauliflower. Arugula is basically a spicy little leaf which appears bitter to some, while for others, it has a peppery-mustardy flavor. It is often mixed with other milder vegetables to get a balanced salad. Arugula is known by a host of different names in different parts of the world. Some of them are garden rocket, rucola, roquette and colewort. Arugula has a host of health benefits like it helps in reducing weight, lowers any risk of cancer, helps to keep your bones healthy and improves your eyesight. Growing to a height of 20-100 cms, Aragula can be easily recognized by its small, white flowers. It is grown on a large scale for commercial purposes but wild varities of the plant can be found in different parts of the world. Arugula is predominantly consumed in the Americas, Europe and in North Africa.

Nutritional Value of Arugula

Arugula has immense nutritional value and optimum consumption of this leafy vegetable will provide you with a healthy body and a clear mind. It contains high levels of folic acid and anti-oxidants like Vitamin A, Vitamin K and Vitamin C. These help you fight the free radicals in your body. In addition to all these, it is rich in carotenoids and also contains important minerals like potassium, manganese, calcium and others. These minerals are good for your body and help you lead a healthy life. Arugula is low in calories and rich in nutrients; so you can opt for this vegetable without worrying about putting on too much weight. The phytochemicals present in Aragula help in preventing cancer. Arugula has lesser quantities of oxalates compared to other leafy vegetables and this enables easy absorption of minerals by your body.

Health Benefits of Arugula

Mentioned below are the best health benefits of Arugula
Health Benefits of Arugula

Detoxification of body

Anti-oxidants regulate the enzyme reactions within our cells and also help to destroy the free radicals within our body which are harmful and can cause diseases. Aragula contains a substantial amount of anti-oxidants and, therefore, can help you lead a healthy life. In addition to this, anti-oxidants protect your body from various illnesses like common cold and even safeguards your system against cancer, premature aging and heart diseases.

Fights cancer

It has been observed over the course of the last three decades that consuming a considerable quantity of cruciferous vegetables like Aragula can lower the risk of cancer, mainly lung and colon cancer. Cruciferous vegetables have a bitter taste due to the sulfur-containing compounds (sulforaphane). But it are these compounds only which also give cancer-fighting properties to aragula. Researchers are trying to find out the beneficial effects of sulforaphane in fighting melanoma, esophageal, prostate and pancreatic cancers. It has been detected by researchers that sulforaphane can inhibit the enzyme histone deacetylase, which is involved in the progression of cancer.

Eye protection

Aragula contains good quantities of the anti-oxidant Vitamin A. This is very good for your eyes. It even improves the health of your bones and teeth. Vitamin A protects the surface of the eye i.e. cornea and thus it is essential for good vision.

Good for the bones

Arugula contains Vitamin K which is essential for strong and healthy bones and delays the onset of osteoporosis. Vitamin K catalyzes osteotrophic activity in cells which means that it promotes formation of bones. With the onset of certain diseases like Alzheimer’s, Vitamin K works to slow down the degradation of neural pathways. Arugula, being a good source of Vitamin K, can help guard oneself against these diseases.

Strengthens the Immune System

Arugula contains a host of vitamins and minerals that is sure to boost your immunity system and guard against a variety of diseases. In addition to various immunity enhancing properties, arugula contains copper which helps to create more white blood cells. The white blood cells are the primary defense agents of your body and protect you against a whole lot of disease causing agents. In addition, arugula contains Vitamin C which is one of the best defenses for your body as it acts against the disease-causing inflammatory free radicals and eliminate them from the body.

Good for expecting mothers

Arugula contains folates, a classification that contains folic acid, which decrease occurrences of mental defects in newborn babies. Folates primarily help the body to manufacture new cells and, therefore, help guard against any anomaly that might plague a newborn child. So arugula is an excellent choice for would-be-mothers.

Helps to fight diabetes

Arugula contains an anti-oxidant called alpha-lipoic acid that has proved to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity and prevents oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes. It also helps to decrease peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in diabetes. So it would be good to include arugula in the diet of a diabetic.

Enhances metabolism

An important health benefit of arugula is that it helps to enhance metabolism. Arugula has Vitamin B-complex that aids the metabolism process in your body. Eight B-complex vitamins take part and facilitate different cell activities like energy production, fat synthesis, the production of red blood cells and also aid other many other vital processes for cell and metabolic health.

Helps absorption of minerals

Arugula helps in the absorption of minerals by our body. This is because arugula has a very low level of oxalates when compared to other leafy vegetables. Absorption of minerals in the body system is prevented by oxalates. So arugula, with its low oxalate content, helps to absorb the essential minerals like copper and iron which are so beneficial for your health.

Enhances athletic performance

Arugula is rich in nitrate which helps to improve muscle oxygenation during exercise. Regular dietary intake of nitrate facilitates exercise tolerance during endurance workouts. Nitrate consumption helps improve quality of life for people who find it difficult to execute the activities of daily life. So arugula can help people with cardiovascular, respiratory or metabolic diseases.

Helps with weight loss

Regular intake of arugula helps in losing weight in addition to the other benefits that it provides. Arugula is low in calories and rich in vitamin or nutrients and thus will provide the necessary nourishment to your body without adding to your body weight.

Uses of Arugula

Arugula has a number of uses and regular intake of this leafy vegetable can have good effects on your body. Arugula contains Vitamin K which keeps your bone and health in good condition. It has Vitamin A which helps to keep your eyes in good condition and also regulates the neurological functions of your body. Furthermore, Vitamin A also furnishes you with good, healthy skin. The folates in arugula help your body to manufacture new cells. The beta-carotine help maintain eye health. Arugula also contains isothiocyanates which are chemical compounds which help in fighting cancer and also have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties.

Side-Effects & Allergies of Arugula

Although consuming arugula in optimum quantities may have quite a few beneficial effects, over consumption of anything can take a toll on your health. Some of the short-term side effects of arugula include flatulence and abdominal cramping and discomfort. These bad effects are caused due to the presence of sulforaphane in arugula. Again it is dangerous for people with certain blood disorders or people who take medications for blood thinning. Arugula contains Vitamin K which can cause blood clots when it counter reacts with certain blood thinners. Arugula contains nitrate and improper storage may result in bacteria converting the nitrate to nitrite which is harmful for your health.

Cultivation of Arugula

Eruca Sativa or arugula typically grows on dry, disturbed ground and it uses larvae of certain moth species. The arugula plant has been consumed for centuries in the Mediterranean region. Since the 1st century A.D., Arugula salad had also been widely consumed in parts of Italy and the Middle East. People knew the benefits of arugula seeds and raw leaves for many centuries and ate those for their nutritional benefits. The seeds were traditionally used as flavoring oils and had widespread usage in traditional medicinal practices in the Mediterranean, Turkey, Lebanon and Syria. It was a natural infertility treatment and also to improve skin problems and digestion. In India, the leaves were pressed to produce oil and taramira, a medicinal and cosmetic tincture blend was produced. Arugula is even mentioned in the Bible and in Jewish religious texts.

Arugula is best cultivated in spring or fall as it is a cool season annual plant. It requires full sun and fertile, well-drained soil to flourish. It will benefit from compost or fertilizer as it grows green leaves. It requires adequate water to flourish when the soil gets dry.

Popular Questions & Answers

I am suffering from PCOD and I am not getting any interest in sex. I am not getting any satisfaction. I was taking femilon for last three months and my menstrual cycle has become normal. Kindly suggest any medicine.

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Pune
take sepia0 /2 one dose puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 12c sam abov conium 3c 3tims aday for 5 days diet for u cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts • greens, including red leaf lettuce and arugula • green and red peppers • beans and lentils • almonds • berries • sweet potatoes • winter squash • pumpkin inform me progres

Hi I'm 35 years old. Have two daughter aged 9 and 4 years. I have not adopted permanent family planning technique. So far my periods were regular bet ween 20_28 days. From last 2-3 months im getting my periods too early less than 15 days. My height is 5.3 and weight 60 kgs. Don't have any serious health issues. Any no change in life style. Can you please guide me for this problem.

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Pune
take sepia0 /2 one dose puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 12c sam abov conium 3c 3tims aday for 5 days diet for u cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts • greens, including red leaf lettuce and arugula • green and red peppers • beans and lentils • almonds • berries • sweet potatoes • winter squash • pumpkin inform me progres
1 person found this helpful

Hello, I am 33 years old. I have missed my periods last month. I'm not pregnant. Now what can I do to do regular my periods?

B.H.M.S.
Homeopath, Solapur
Take sepia0 /2 one dose puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 12c sam abov conium 3c 3tims aday for 5 days diet for you cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts •greens, including red leaf lettuce and arugula •green and red peppers •beans and lentils •almonds •berries •sweet potatoes •winter squash •pumpkin inform me progres.
1 person found this helpful

Hello doctor, I'm 17 years old and my period lasts for 2 days only for a very long time. What should I do?

B.H.M.S.
Homeopath, Solapur
Take sepia0 /2 one dose puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 12c sam abov conium 3c 3tims aday for 5 days diet for you cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts •greens, including red leaf lettuce and arugula •green and red peppers •beans and lentils •almonds •berries •sweet potatoes •winter squash •pumpkin inform me progres.
1 person found this helpful

Tell me diet for pcos as I have severe acne taking primson35 tablet and on breastfeed. Please advise

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Pune
take sepia0 /2 one dose puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 12c sam abov conium 3c 3tims aday for 5 days diet for u cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts • greens, including red leaf lettuce and arugula • green and red peppers • beans and lentils • almonds • berries • sweet potatoes • winter squash • pumpkin inform me progres
1 person found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

The Immunity Boosting Meal Plan

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
The Immunity Boosting Meal Plan

The immunity boosting meal plan for 7 days 

Aim to drink 8 cups of water throughout each day.

Monday

Breakfast
• 1 cup yogurt
• ½ cup strawberries, halved
• 1 cup orange juice
Snack
• 4 graham cracker squares
• 1 tbsp almond butter
Lunch
Tuna-sunflower wrap
• 2 hardboiled eggs, sliced
• 1 whole wheat tortilla
• ½ cup lettuce
• ½ cup (60 g) tuna (mixed with 1 tsp mayonnaise)
• 1 tbsp sunflower seeds
• 1/3 avocado, sliced
Snack
• 10 baby carrots
• 1 cup skim milk
Dinner
Honey ‘n’ lime glazed salmon
• ½ cup cooked green beans
• ½ cup cooked brown rice
• ¼ canteloupe, cut in chunks
Total calories: 1729

Tuesday

Breakfast
• 2 rice cakes
• 2 tbsp almond butter
• 1 grapefruit
• 1 cup green or black tea
Snack
• 1 orange
• 1 cup skim milk
Lunch
Leftover honey ‘n’ lime glazed salmon
• 1 cup green leaf lettuce
• ¼ cup sunflower seeds
• 1 whole wheat pita
Option: use pita to make a honey n’ lime glazed salmon pita sandwich or simply eat pita quarters as a side

Snack
• 1 cup yogourt
• ½ cup strawberries
Dinner
Chard ‘n’ cheese pie 
Green salad
• 1 cup green or red leaf lettuce
• ½ cup sliced mushrooms
• ½ cup sliced cucumber
• 5 grape tomatoes
• 1 tbsp salad dressing
Total calories: 1747

Wednesday
Breakfast

1 yogourt smoothie
• 1 cup yogourt
• ½ cup raspberries
Blend together until desired consistency

Snack
Quick avocado-cheese snack
• ½ whole wheat pita
• ¼ avocado
• 1 oz cheddar cheese
Lunch
Leftover chard ‘n’ cheese pie
• 1 whole wheat roll
• 1 cup skim milk
Snack
• ¼ cup almonds
• 1 orange
Dinner
Grilled teriyaki-orange turkey breast
• ½ cup cooked quinoa
• 1 cup kale, stir-fried with 1 chopped garlic clove and 1 tsp olive oil
• 1 cup vanilla frozen yogourt
Total calories: 1811

Thursday

Breakfast
• 1 cup whole grain cereal
• ¼ cup blueberries
• 1 cup yogourt
• 1 cup green tea
Snack
• 1 apple
Lunch
Arugula-tuna wrap
• 1 whole grain tortilla
• ½ can (60 g) tuna (mixed with 1 tsp mayonnaise)
• ½ avocado, sliced
• ½ cup arugula
• 1 cup skim milk
• 1 plum
Snack
• 10 carrot sticks
Dinner
Feta, rapini and sweet red pepper pasta
• ½ grapefruit
Total calories: 1856

Friday

Breakfast
• 1 cup mixed fruit yogurt
• ½ cup raspberries
• 1 cup green tea
• 2 rice cakes
• 1 tbsp almond butter

Snack
• 1 grapefruit
• 4 graham crackers (1 large rectangle)
Lunch
Leftover feta, rapini and sweet red pepper pasta
• 1 small whole wheat roll
• 1 orange
Snack
• ½ whole wheat pita
• 2 oz cheddar cheese

Dinner
Superb pressed lemony chicken
• ½ cup cooked brown rice
• 1 cup steamed broccoli
• 2 ginger snaps
Total calories: 1835

Saturday

Breakfast
• 1 cup cooked oatmeal
• ¼ cup raisins
• 1 cup orange juice
Snack
• 1 apple
• 2 oz cheddar cheese, cubed
Lunch
Beefy caesar salad with hot garlic bread
Snack
• 2 cups air-popped popcorn
• 1 cup green tea
Dinner
Chunky fall chili
• 1 cup brown rice
• 2 tbsp grated cheddar cheese
• 1 cup frozen yogurt
Total calories: 1765

Sunday

Breakfast
3 pancakes
• ½ cup strawberries
• 1 cup skim milk
Snack
• 1 pear

Lunch

Leftover chunky fall chili
• ½ cup cooked brown rice
• 2 tbsp grated cheddar cheese
Snack
• 3 stalks celery
• 2 tbsp peanut butter

Dinner
Chicken-and-almond stir-fry
• 1 cup couscous, cooked
• 1 cup stir-fried red and yellow pepper strips
• ½ red pepper
• ½ yellow pepper
• ½ tsp olive oil
• ½ cup ice cream

Total calories: 1687.

2 people found this helpful

What Are Uterine Fibroids?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery
General Surgeon, Kota
What Are Uterine Fibroids?

A lot of women have uterine fibroids at some point in their life. You may have even had them and never known it. That’s because they often don’t cause any pain or symptoms.

So if you can get them and not have side effects, how do you even know if you have them? And should you be concerned?

What Are They?

Uterine fibroids, which your doctor may call leiomyomas or myomas, are muscular tumors that can grow on your uterus. They rarely turn into cancer, and if you get them it doesn’t mean you’re more likely to get uterine cancer.

Fibroids can vary a lot in size, shape, and location. They can show up in your uterus, uterine wall, or on its surface. They can also attach to your uterus by a stalk- or stem-like structure.

Some are so small that your doctor can’t even see them with the naked eye. Others grow in big masses that can affect the size and shape of the uterus.

Uterine fibroids usually appear in women of childbearing age -- generally between 30 and 40 years old, but they can show up at any age. They’re also more common in African-American women than in white women, and tend to show up earlier and grow quicker in African-Americans, as well. Doctors don’t know why that is.

What Are the Symptoms?

Some women may find out they have uterine fibroids because their doctor discovers them during a routine exam or ultrasound. You may be different, though.

If you do have symptoms, they might include:

  • Heavy bleeding or painful periods
  • Bleeding between periods
  • Pressure, pain, or fullness in your lower stomach
  • Enlarged abdomen or uterus
  • Constipation
  • Needing to pee often or trouble emptying your bladder
  • Pain during sex
  • Miscarriages or infertility

What Causes Them?

Experts don’t know exactly why you get fibroids. Hormones and genetics might make you more likely to get them.

Hormones. Estrogen and progesterone are the hormones that make the lining of your uterus thicken every month during your period. They also seem to affect fibroid growth. When hormone production slows down during menopause, fibroids usually shrink.

Genetics. Researchers have found genetic differences between fibroids and normal cells in the uterus.

Am I at Risk?

Besides age and race, there are a few other things that can raise your chances of developing uterine fibroids, such as family history. You’re more likely to get fibroids if your mom or sister has had them.

Many other things can contribute to your chances of getting uterine fibroids, including:

  • Getting your first period at a young age
  • Birth control use
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Eating too much red meat and not enough green vegetables, fruit, or dairy
  • Alcohol

Can I Prevent Them?

No, but there is some research that suggests certain lifestyle habits can reduce your chances.

One study found that high-sugar diets may be linked to a higher risk in some women. Another study found that eating fresh fruits and cruciferous vegetables like arugula, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, and turnip greens could lower your odds. Cruciferous vegetables are rich in beta-carotene, folate, vitamins C, E, and K, and other minerals. They’re also full of fiber.

Regular exercise also can lower your chances of uterine fibroids.

5 people found this helpful

10 Foods You Should Never Eat Past their Expiry Date!

Diploma in Diet and Nutrition, B.Pharma, MD - Alternate Medicine
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Gurgaon
10 Foods You Should Never Eat Past their Expiry Date!

Though some foods do not expire, but it is advisable not to consume certain foods once they have expired. 

  1. Eggs: Eggs contain large amounts of nutrients per calorie. They are a cheap and tasty source of protein. It is no big surprise that they have turned into a breakfast staple; yet in case that you are eating an egg that is past its expiry date, do reconsider. These are the most widely recognized reasons for food-borne illnesses.
  2. Meat: Bacteria are common in both pre-packaged meats, and in the pieces you take from your butcher at the market. The listeria bacteria are especially hazardous, as the type of harm it causes can be lethal in most of the cases. From a general outlook, it is best to avoid processed meat.
  3. Mixed greens: Mixed greens including spinach, arugula, spring blend, bundled plate of mixed greens lettuce and other veggies do not keep extremely well after their due date. So if their withered appearance and disgusting covering does not turn you off, think about the bacteria and pathogens hiding underneath your sandwich bread.
  4. Hay sprouts: It is important that you use them rapidly once you get them, since they tend to be bacteria magnets. Truth be told, hay pulls in a greater number of germs than other vegetables, particularly in case you abandon them unrefrigerated.
  5. Clams/oysters: Bad oysters can be fatal. This is based on the type of microscopic organisms that develop in spoiled oysters. It is known as V. vulnificus. It causes an extreme type of food poisoning. V. vulnificus bacteria affects the circulatory system, sending the body into a septic shock.
  6. Shrimp: Much like clams and shellfish, shrimps are extremely inclined to bacterial contaminations. It is not to be consumed after a while since it can lead to food poisoning or diarrhea.
  7. Crude ground beef: E. coli bacteria are the most basic reason for food poisoning. These bacteria originate from the animal’s digestive systems and are available in all hamburger items. In case that the hamburger is prepared and taken care of securely, it will not turn into a problem.
  8. Berries: When berries turn sour, they pull in extensive amounts of cyclospora, a kind of bacteria that leads to food poisoning. While this sort of food poisoning is not as harmful as some others, it is something you definitely need to stay away from.
  9. Soft cheese: With hard cheeses, similar to cheddar, it is regularly safe to remove the external edges and eat the soft cheese underneath. However, this practice does not reach out to soft cheeses, similar to brie. In case you are discovering mold on the edges of your soft cheese, do not eat it. You may end up with an infection.
  10. Chicken: Poultry items, including chicken tend to cause the maximum harm in case that they are not taken care of and cooked properly. Undercooked and old chicken can be very unsafe for health.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

6017 people found this helpful

Foods That Help Fight The Flu!

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition (Delhi University)
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Panipat
Foods That Help Fight The Flu!

We all look forward to the burst of rain after a long hot summer and the cool autumn breeze that follows the rains. What we don’t look forward to is the sneezing runny noses and coughs that accompany this change in weather. Seasonal flus are very common but they can be prevented by eating right. Some foods that can help prevent colds and coughs include:

  1. Garlic: Garlic is a powerful antioxidant that can boost the immune system and help you fight the flu. One of the major compounds found in garlic is known as allicin. This has antibacterial and anti-microbial properties. Garlic also promotes the growth of healthy gut bacteria that keeps your digestive system functioning efficiently and prevents toxins from accumulating inside your body. Garlic can be easily added to your diet by using fresh garlic pods to flavor your food.
  2. Turmeric: Turmeric is one of the healthiest spices known to man. This is rich in anti-oxidants and also has anti-inflammatory properties. Turmeric helps remove toxins from the body and is known to boost the immune system. It is a popular ingredient in many curries and is typically used in its powdered form.
  3. Green Leafy Vegetables: Green vegetables such as kale, spinach, and arugula are rich sources of vitamin C. This vitamin is known to fight viruses and reduce the risk of catching a cold. These vegetables are also rich in fiber and aid in digestion and removal of waste from the body. When picking green vegetables it is important to note that the darker the shade of green, the higher the nutrient content.
  4. Chicken Soup: Chicken soup is a popular home remedy for the flu. It can also be used to prevent a flu and boost the immune system. This is because a clear chicken soup or broth has concentrated amounts of proteins and vitamins that boost the immune system. Chicken soup should always be consumed while it is hot so that the hot liquid can loosen mucus secretions soothe an itchy throat.
  5. Salmon: Fish such as salmon, canned tuna and sardines and egg yolks have a high level of Vitamin D. As the length of a day reduces and grey clouds hide the sun, it is important for your body to get enough vitamin D through your diet. This vitamin helps fight colds and coughs and helps those suffering from it to recover faster.
  6. Water: In addition to eating right, it is also important to keep your body hydrated. This allows the nutrients to reach all the parts of your body and aids in the removal of waste and toxins. Thus, though you may not feel thirsty, it is essential to drink 8 to 10 glasses of water a day.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3981 people found this helpful

Health Benefits of Salad Greens

Sexologist Clinic
Sexologist, Faridabad
Health Benefits of Salad Greens

Build your bonesSpinach,radicchio and watercress may not immediately come to mind as foodsfor keeping bones strong, but all contain lots of vitamin K. A study at TuftsUniversityin Boston found that low dietary intake of vitamin K in women was associated with low bone mineral density. (Thestudy didn’t find a link in men.) Just one cup (250 mL) of chopped watercresshas 100 percent of your daily vitamin K; radicchio, 120 percent; and spinach,170 percent.Sharpen your eyesightTosstogether a salad of spinach,romaine and red leaf lettuce: They all contain loads of the carotenoids vitaminA, lutein and zeaxanthin’key to seeing better. Vitamin A helps eyes adapt from brightlight to darkness. Lutein and zeaxanthin can help filterout high-energy light that may cause eye damage from free radicals.Rev up your musclesRecentSwedish research found that inorganic nitrate ‘abundant in spinach‘resultedin muscles using less oxygen. Thestudy, which had healthy participants ride an exercise bike before and aftertaking a dose of nitrate, found it improved the performanceof the mitochondria’which power our cells’in muscles.Protect your heartWhipup a Caesar salad to benefit from romaine’s high levels of two heart-healthynutrients: Two cups (500 mL) of shredded romaine contain 40 percent of yourdaily needs of folate and 10 percent of fibre. A study done at TulaneUniversity in New Orleans showed that the higher the level of folate in aperson’s diet, the lower the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Soluble fibre hasbeen shown to reduce the level of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) or ‘bad’cholesterol.Reduce risk of diabetesChronic magnesiumdeficiency has been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes andthe development of insulin resistance. Twocups (500 mL) of spinach contain 16 percent of your daily magnesium needs;arugula has six percent.

 

1 person found this helpful

Table of Content

Arugula
Nutritional Value of Arugula
Health Benefits of Arugula
Detoxification of body
Fights cancer
Eye protection
Good for the bones
Strengthens the Immune System
Good for expecting mothers
Helps to fight diabetes
Enhances metabolism
Helps absorption of minerals
Enhances athletic performance
Helps with weight loss
Uses of Arugula
Side-Effects & Allergies of Arugula
Cultivation of Arugula