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Overview

Painful Sexual Intercourse: Treatment, Procedure, Cost and Side Effects

What is the treatment?

Painful sexual intercourse is usually caused by the inability to have or maintain an erection, sexual weakness or erectile dysfunction (ED) that is fairly common in men. Women after menopause or undergoing a urinary tract infection (UTI) may also have pain while intercourse. There are plenty of treatment options available that people can employ in order to cure themselves of this condition. Treatment options vary from simple methods such as oral medications and injections to more complex ones such as surgeries, implants and pumps. However, before a treatment option can be zeroed in on, a doctor will conduct diagnostic tests to find out exactly what's causing the problem. After an analysis of the cause, the most suitable treatment option will be chosen by the doctor with the consent of the patient. That said, the chosen treatment option will not only vary on the basis of the cause but also the severity of the condition. Patients will be explained the risks and benefits of each of the treatment options so that they can make the best choice with the help of the doctor and know what they are getting into. > In case you are suffering from a severe urinary tract infection, then you may have to be hospitalized. This is because the doctor will want to give you your medications intravenously in order to clear the infection faster.

How is the treatment done?

Medications are known to treat the pain either due to an infection or a medical condition. In case there are medical conditions which already exist and are causing vaginal dryness then the doctor will recommend a few alternatives. A number of oral medications are prescribed for the causes of painful sex. They help in increasing the blood flow to the penis so that an erection can be maintained in response to sexual stimulation. Some of the other medications prescribed by a doctor, need to be injected instead of taking orally such as alprostadil, which is injected into the base of the penis with the help of a needle. Another treatment method known as alprostadil urethral suppository works by placing a suppository inside the man's penis in the penile urethra with the help of a special applicator.

Apart from the above, penis pumps and surgery is also an option. Penis pumps work by placing the tube of the pump on the penis and using the pump given to suck out air that is present in the tube. The vaccuum created increases blood flow to the penis, thereby helping in gettng an erection. Once the man gets the erection, he is supposed to slip a tension ring on the base of his penis and keep it there to maintain the erection. A drug named as ospemifene is taken at a dosage of 60 mg/day by women with menopause.

Who is eligible for the treatment? (When is the treatment done?)

Men who suffer from sexual weakness and do not have heart diseases are eligible for medications used to treat painful sex. Potential candidates for surgery and penis pumps include those on whom medications did not prove to be effective.

Who is not eligible for the treatment?

Oral medications should not be taken by men who suffer from heart diseases or chest problems as well as very low blood pressure. To know about who is not eligible for a penile implant, one should consult their doctor.

Are there any side effects?

Different treatment methods for painful sex have different side effects. For example, side effects of oral medications include nasal congestion, blurry vision, flushing, stomach upset and backache. Side effects of injections urethral suppository include prolonged erection and mild bleeding as well as pain and formation of fibrous tissues in the penis. The side effects of penile implants include infection, formation of scar tissue, uncontrolled bleeding etc.

What are the post-treatment guidelines?

Men who take oral medications or those in the form of injections or urethral suppositories need to follow any post treatment guidelines as such although they should consult with their doctors about that. Those who go through penile implants must rest for a couple of days after the operation and should not lift anything heavy either until their doctor allows them to.

How long does it take to recover?

Once a man gets an erection with the help of medications (oral or otherwise), they may last for about half an hour after which the penis will go back to its normal flaccid state. Recovery from a penile implant surgery takes about 6 weeks.

What is the price of the treatment in India?

Oral medications cost between Rs. 450 and Rs. 600 for a pack of 10. The Alprostadil self-injection costs roughly Rs. 5,900, while the cost of the penis pump is around Rs. 200 to Rs. 600. A penile implant surgery can set one back by around Rs 1 lakh.

Are the results of the treatment permanent?

The results of the penile surgery are permanent. The results of medications, injections, suppositories and pumps are temporary and they have to be used again before sex in order to get results.

What are the alternatives to the treatment?

There are plenty of alternative remedies available for pain while having sexual intercourse. These include exercising, making lifestyle changes, trying out homeopathy or ayurvedic supplments and opting for a testosterone replacement. However, before opting for any of them, one should consult their doctor.

Safety: Medium Effectiveness: Medium Timeliness: Medium Relative Risk: Medium Side Effects: High Time For Recovery: High Price Range:

Rs. 450- Rs. 600.

Popular Health Tips

Painful Sex - 14 Reasons Behind It!

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist,
Painful Sex - 14 Reasons Behind It!

Dyspareunia or painful intercourse can bring problems in the lives of a couple. Not only it affects their physical relationship but also causes an emotional stress as well. Women may experience pain during intercourse with their partner for several reasons. 

Causes of a painful intercourse 

A few common reasons that might induce a pain during intercourse are: 

  1. Insufficient vaginal lubrication: If the vagina is not moistened with a liquid secreting from the vagina, intercourse can be painful. Lesser lubrication can be resolved with an increase in foreplay or relaxing on the woman’s part. Lubricating creams can also be used in such cases. 
  2. Vaginal tightness: If the vaginal entrance is tight, then the woman can feel pain during the intercourse. This happens in case of rigid hymen or hymen which is abnormal. 
  3. Vaginal infections: Yeast infection or trichomoniasis can induce pain. If an individual has herpes sore on the outside portion of the genitals, intercourse can be painful. 
  4. Vaginismus: This is a common cause that happens mostly due to the fear that women feel about getting hurt during sex. It is an involuntary reaction in the muscles surrounding the vagina. Even a thought of sex can cause severe spasm. This prevents vaginal penetration and at times rough sex, which causes more pain and swelling. 
  5. Uterus problems: Fibroids can cause pain during a deep intercourse. 
  6. Cervical problems: Deep penetration can reach the cervix, in that case, pain is inevitable. It is common in women who’s cervix is long or one who’s uterus has come down from normal position ( prolapsed ) 
  7. Menopause: When a woman reaches her age of menopause, the vagina loses its natural lubrication, hence, coital dryness is experienced which may cause vaginal tears and injury. 
  8. Ovarian problems: The ovary can have cysts due to several reasons like infections, pregnancy, chocolate cysts of endometriosis etc. Having a cyst would induce pain during intercourse. 
  9. Endometriosis: Women’s uterus is lined with a tissue named endometrium. If for some reason the endometrial tissue grows outside the uterus, like in pelvis, ovaries etc, pain can be felt at sex. 
  10. Pelvic inflammatory disease: With this disease, the tissues which are situated deep inside the vagina can be infected and inflamed. This causes friction during the intercourse resulting in pain.
  11. Sexually transmitted diseases: It is another cause for experiencing pain during the intercourse. 
  12. Ectopic pregnancy: It is that type of pregnancy where the fertilised egg grows outside the uterus. In such a condition, intercourse may be painful. 
  13. Injured vulva: Vulva or vagina can be injured if the female develops a tear during childbirth. In normal delivery, a cut is deliberately given in the portion between the anus and the vagina (episiotomy) which may cause pain at sex. 
  14. Vulvodynia: When a woman’s vulva, that is the sexual organs like labia, clitoris, and the opening of the vagina experiences chronic pain then intercourse becomes painful. 

Other causes might be irregular bleeding, intercourse soon after a pelvic, vaginal surgery or childbirth or genital lesions. In such cases, an individual must consult a doctor immediately. 

Treatments for Painful Intercourse 
The treatment for pain during intercourse depends on the cause. If the cause is an intercourse soon after pregnancy, then it can be avoided by waiting for six weeks after giving birth before indulging in intercourse. If the issue is of dryness or insufficient lubrication, the lubricants which are water-based can be applied in the area. Sometimes menopause can cause pain, in that case, it is advisable to consult a doctor about oestrogen creams or any other prescribed medicine. Other causes may require medication prescribed by a gynaecologist. https://www.lybrate.com/kalyani/doctor/dr-parag-patil-gynaecologist-1Consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3065 people found this helpful

Know Everything About Fibroid

FRCOG (LONDON) (Fellow of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists), CCT (Lon), DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Know Everything About Fibroid

Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. Fibroids, also known as uterine myomas, leiomyomas, or fibromas, are firm, compact tumors that are made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue that develop in the uterus. It is estimated that between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed. Some estimates state that only about one-third of these fibroids are large enough to be detected by a doctor during a physical examination.

In more than 99 percent of fibroid cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous). These tumors are not associated with cancer and do not increase a woman's risk for uterine cancer. They may range in size, from the size of a pea to the size of a softball or small grapefruit.

Causes: While it is not clearly known what causes fibroids, it is believed that each tumor develops from an aberrant muscle cell in the uterus, which multiplies rapidly because of the influence of estrogen.

Risk Factors:

  • Age: Women who are approaching menopause are at the greatest risk for fibroids because of their long exposure to high levels of estrogen.
  • Obesity
  • Race: African-American heritage also seems to be at an increased risk, although the reasons for this are not clearly understood.
  • Parity: Some studies, of small numbers of women, have indicated that women who have had two liveborn children have one-half the risk of developing uterine fibroids compared to women who have had no children. Scientists are not sure whether having children actually protected women from fibroids or whether fibroids were a factor in infertility in women who had no children.

Symptoms:

Some women who have fibroids have no symptoms, or have only mild symptoms, while other women have more severe, disruptive symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for uterine fibroids:

  • Heavy or prolonged menstrual periods

  • Abnormal bleeding between menstrual periods

  • Pelvic pain (caused as the tumor presses on pelvic organs)

  • Frequent urination

  • Low back pain

  • Pain during intercourse

  • A firm mass, often located near the middle of the pelvis, which can be felt by the doctor on examination

In some cases, the heavy or prolonged menstrual periods, or the abnormal bleeding between periods, can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which also requires treatment.

Diagnosis: Fibroids are most often found during a routine pelvic examination. This, along with an abdominal examination, may indicate a firm, irregular pelvic mass to the physician. In addition to a complete medical history and physical and pelvic and/or abdominal examination, diagnostic procedures for uterine fibroids may include:

  • Transvaginal ultrasound (also called ultrasonography). An ultrasound test using a small instrument called a transducer, that is placed in the vagina.

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A non-invasive procedure that produces a two-dimensional view of an internal organ or structure.

  • Hysterosalpingography. X-ray examination of the uterus and fallopian tubes that use dye and is often performed to rule out tubal obstruction.

  • Hysteroscopy. Visual examination of the canal of the cervix and the interior of the uterus using a viewing instrument (hysteroscope) inserted through the vagina.

  • Blood test (to check for iron-deficiency anemia if heavy bleeding is caused by the tumor).

Treatment: Since most fibroids stop growing or may even shrink as a woman approaches menopause, the doctor may simply suggest "watchful waiting." With this approach, the doctor monitors the woman's symptoms carefully to ensure that there are no significant changes or developments and that the fibroids are not growing.

In women whose fibroids are large or are causing significant symptoms, treatment may be necessary. Treatment will be determined by the doctor based on:

  • Your overall health and medical history

  • Extent of the disease

  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies

  • Expectations for the course of the disease

  • Your opinion or preference

  • Your desire for pregnancy

In general, treatment for fibroids may include:

  1. Hysterectomy. Hysterectomies involve the surgical removal of the entire uterus.

  2. Conservative surgical therapy. Conservative surgical therapy uses a procedure called a myomectomy. With this approach, physicians will remove the fibroids, but leave the uterus intact to enable a future pregnancy.

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRH agonists). This approach lowers levels of estrogen and triggers a "medical menopause." Sometimes GnRH agonists are used to shrink the fibroid, making surgical treatment easier.

  4. Anti-hormonal agents. Certain drugs oppose estrogen (such as progestin and Danazol), and appear effective in treating fibroids. Anti-progestins, which block the action of progesterone, are also sometimes used.

  5. Uterine artery embolization. Also called uterine fibroid embolization, uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a newer minimally-invasive (without a large abdominal incision) technique. The arteries supplying blood to the fibroids are identified, then embolized (blocked off). The embolization cuts off the blood supply to the fibroids, thus shrinking them. Health care providers continue to evaluate the long-term implications of this procedure on fertility and regrowth of the fibroid tissue.

  6. Anti-inflammatory painkillers. This type of drug is often effective for women who experience occasional pelvic pain or discomfort. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2406 people found this helpful

Vaginal Yeast Infection - Signs You are Suffering from it

MBBS, DGO, DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology)
Gynaecologist, Chennai
Vaginal Yeast Infection - Signs You are Suffering from it

A yeast infection in the vagina is characterized by itchiness, irritation in the vulva and vaginal discharge. Inflammation occurs in the tissues of the vagina, leading to constant itching. Though this is not a sexually transmitted infection, the fungus may spread via oral sex where the mouth and genitals come in contact.

The symptoms of vaginal yeast infection are:

1. You may experience a painful sensation during sexual intercourse

2. An itching sensation in the vaginal opening

3. A sore and painful vagina

4. Rashes may develop in the vagina

5. You may have a thick and whitish discharge from your vagina

Apart from this, the symptoms may turn severe under certain circumstances. The risk factors are:

1. If you are a diabetic, then you are at a high risk of contracting this infection

2. Pregnancy

3. If you are taking medications or have infections such as HIV then it may cause your immune system to malfunction. This increases your risk of vaginal yeast infections.

4. Multiple episodes of yeast infections (about 4 or more).

Causes behind it

The vaginal yeast infection is caused by a fungus known as candida. This fungus naturally exists in the vagina along with a bacterium called ‘lactobacillus’. This bacteria produces a substance that controls the over growth of the yeast. Yeast infection occurs when the balance is disturbed due to various factors such as:

1. If you are pregnant

2. Taking antibiotics may modify the pH balance of your vagina, leading to yeast infection

3. Any therapy or medication that increases estrogen levels in the body

4. If you have diabetes or an impaired immune system

Treatment

Medications such as ointments, tablets and creams are administered to get rid of the yeast infection. It is recommended to not use latex condoms as birth control measures; as the oily nature of the lotions and ointment can weaken the latex thus, increasing the risks of unplanned pregnancies.

There are certain preventive measures which you may adopt to prevent these infections, them being:

1. Do not wear tight fitting undergarments

2. The material of your clothes should preferably be cotton based

3. Do not use hot water for your bath

4. Don’t stay in your wet clothes for long hours

9 people found this helpful

Everything You Want To Know About Endometriosis

FRCOG (LONDON) (Fellow of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists), CCT (Lon), DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Everything You Want To Know About Endometriosis

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond pelvic organs.

With endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that can cause pelvic tissues and organs to stick to each other.

Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

Symptoms

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual cramp that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain increases over time.

Common Signs and Symptoms of Endometriosis may include:

  • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea). Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before your period and extend several days into your period. You may also have lower back and abdominal pain.

  • Pain with intercourse. Pain during or after sex is common with endometriosis.

  • Pain with bowel movements or urination. You're most likely to experience these symptoms during your period.

  • Excessive bleeding. You may experience occasional heavy periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

  • Infertility. Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility.

  • Other symptoms. You may also experience fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods.

The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have intense pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all.

Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis.

When to see a doctor

See the doctor if you have signs and symptoms that may indicate endometriosis.

Endometriosis can be a challenging condition to manage. An early diagnosis, a multidisciplinary medical team and an understanding of your diagnosis may result in better management of your symptoms.

Causes

Although the exact cause of endometriosis is not certain, possible explanations include:

  • Retrograde menstruation. In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle.

  • Transformation of peritoneal cells. In what's known as the "induction theory," experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells.

  • Embryonic cell transformation. Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty.

  • Surgical scar implantation. After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision.

  • Endometrial cells transport. The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body.

  • Immune system disorder. It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus.

Risk factors

Several factors place you at greater risk of developing endometriosis, such as:

  • Never giving birth

  • Starting your period at an early age

  • Going through menopause at an older age

  • Short menstrual cycles — for instance, less than 27 days

  • Having higher levels of estrogen in your body or a greater lifetime exposure to estrogen your body produces

  • Low body mass index

  • Alcohol consumption

  • One or more relatives (mother, aunt or sister) with endometriosis

  • Any medical condition that prevents the normal passage of menstrual flow out of the body

  • Uterine abnormalities

Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche). Signs and symptoms of endometriosis end temporarily with pregnancy and end permanently with menopause, unless you're taking estrogen.

Complications

Infertility

The main complication of endometriosis is impaired fertility. Approximately one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis may obstruct the tube and keep the egg and sperm from uniting. But the condition also seems to affect fertility in less-direct ways, such as damage to the sperm or egg. Inspite of this, many women with mild to moderate endometriosis can still conceive and carry a pregnancy to term. Doctors sometimes advise women with endometriosis not to delay having children because the condition may worsen with time.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer does occur at higher than expected rates in women with endometriosis. Although rare, another type of cancer — endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma — can develop later in life in women who have had endometriosis.

Diagnosis: To diagnose endometriosis and other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, the doctor will ask you to describe your symptoms, including the location of your pain and when it occurs.

Tests to check for physical clues of endometriosis include:

  • Pelvic exam. During a pelvic exam, the doctor manually feels (palpates) areas in your pelvis for abnormalities, such as cysts on your reproductive organs or scars behind your uterus. Often it's not possible to feel small areas of endometriosis, unless they've caused a cyst to form.

  • Ultrasound. A transducer, a device that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of your body, is either pressed against your abdomen or inserted into your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). Both types of ultrasound may be done to get the best view of your reproductive organs. Ultrasound imaging won't definitively tell the doctor whether you have endometriosis, but it can identify cysts associated with endometriosis (endometriomas).

  • Laparoscopy. Medical management is usually tried first. But to be certain you have endometriosis, the doctor may advise a surgical procedure called laparoscopy to look inside your abdomen for signs of endometriosis.

While you're under general anesthesia, the doctor makes a tiny incision near your navel and inserts a slender viewing instrument (laparoscope), looking for endometrial tissue outside the uterus. He or she may take samples of tissue (biopsy). Laparoscopy can provide information about the location, extent and size of the endometrial implants to help determine the best treatment options.

Treatment for endometriosis is usually with medications or surgery. The approach you and the doctor choose will depend on the severity of your signs and symptoms and whether you hope to become pregnant.

Generally, doctors recommend trying conservative treatment approaches first, opting for surgery as a last resort.

Pain medications

The doctor may recommend that you take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve, others), to help ease painful menstrual cramps.

If you find that taking the maximum dose of these medications doesn't provide full relief, you may need to try another approach to manage your signs and symptoms.

Hormone therapy

Supplemental hormones are sometimes effective in reducing or eliminating the pain of endometriosis. The rise and fall of hormones during the menstrual cycle causes endometrial implants to thicken, break down and bleed. Hormone medication may slow endometrial tissue growth and prevent new implants of endometrial tissue.

Hormone therapy isn't a permanent fix for endometriosis. You could experience a return of your symptoms after stopping treatment.

Therapies used to treat endometriosis include:

  • Hormonal contraceptives. Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings help control the hormones responsible for the buildup of endometrial tissue each month. Most women have lighter and shorter menstrual flow when they're using a hormonal contraceptive. Using hormonal contraceptives — especially continuous cycle regimens — may reduce or eliminate the pain of mild to moderate endometriosis.

  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists and antagonists. These drugs block the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, lowering estrogen levels and preventing menstruation. This causes endometrial tissue to shrink. Because these drugs create an artificial menopause, taking a low dose of estrogen or progestin along with Gn-RH agonists and antagonists may decrease menopausal side effects, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and bone loss. Your periods and the ability to get pregnant return when you stop taking the medication.

  • Progestin therapy. A progestin-only contraceptive, such as an intrauterine device (Mirena), contraceptive implant or contraceptive injection (Depo-Provera), can halt menstrual periods and the growth of endometrial implants, which may relieve endometriosis signs and symptoms.

  • Danazol. This drug suppresses the growth of the endometrium by blocking the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, preventing menstruation and the symptoms of endometriosis. However, danazol may not be the first choice because it can cause serious side effects and can be harmful to the baby if you become pregnant while taking this medication.

Conservative surgery

If you have endometriosis and are trying to become pregnant, surgery to remove as much endometriosis as possible while preserving your uterus and ovaries (conservative surgery) may increase your chances of success. If you have severe pain from endometriosis, you may also benefit from surgery — however, endometriosis and pain may return.

The doctor may do this procedure laparoscopically or through traditional abdominal surgery in more extensive cases.

Assisted reproductive technologies

Assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) to help you become pregnant are sometimes preferable to conservative surgery. Doctors often suggest one of these approaches if conservative surgery doesn't work. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.

2750 people found this helpful

Urinary Tract Infection - 8 Signs You Are Suffering From It!

M.Ch - Urology/Genito-Urinary Surgery
Urologist, Guwahati
Urinary Tract Infection - 8 Signs You Are Suffering From It!

The urinary tract starts from the kidneys to the urethra where urine is passed out. Given the rich concentration of minerals and toxic wastes, it is highly prone to multiple infections. UTI, as urinary tract infections are often referred to, is one of the most common infections. In women, especially, every 1 in 2 women is affected by an UTI. Whichever part of the tract is affected, the symptoms and treatment are mostly the same. Read on to know some of the most common symptoms and treatment options for these.

Symptoms

  1. A burning sensation with urination
  2. Pain with urination
  3. Burning sensation or pain in the urethra or vagina
  4. Frequent urge to urinate, though not much urine is passed out
  5. Sense of incomplete emptying of the bladder
  6. Pain in the lower back on the sides of the spine
  7. Change in the urine characteristics color, smell, or appearance
  8. Fever or chills, maybe associated with shivering, nausea and vomiting

Causes

Most urinary tract infections are bacterial in nature, and these could find their way into the body through multiple ways.

  1. The most common is through the urethra, which could happen due to unclean toilet habits.
  2. Women especially are advised to wipe the urethra after each toilet visit. The bacteria from the feces can also enter the urethra due to close proximity
  3. Use of unclean public toilets is another reason for UTIs

Tests

Though most often UTI does not require specific testing, the following are useful in confirming the diagnosis.

  1. Culture and sensitivity: The urine is sent for a culture to identify the exact organism that has caused the infection. It also helps identify the right antibiotic which will help bring the infection under control.

Treatment:

UTIs are very common infections and though there is nothing to worry, it should be cleared completely.

  1. Antibiotic course to get rid of the infection. Though you begin to feel better, the complete course should be completed to clear the infection.
  2. Following culture testing to ensure the infection is cleared
  3. Improve water intake to get rid of the toxins
  4. Fever and pain to be controlled with medications
  5. Healthy hygiene habits to ensure clearing of infection

Prevention:

Recurrent UTIs is a common problem, and the following can help prevent.

  1. Ensure complete emptying of the bladder
  2. Drink adequate water
  3. Safe toilet habits, including before and after sex
  4. Comfortable and clean underwear to prevent infection 

    If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an urologist.

2977 people found this helpful

Popular Questions & Answers

I have a very small cut on my virgina clitoris its pain when I touched and continuously get white discharge and smelling and my virgina gets very loose I feel nothing during intercourse.

Diploma in Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Junagadh
Take tab Cefi O two times a day Tab Mosiba two times a day Tab Nuforce only one Tab signoflam two times a day Tab Ulpan d before meal two times a day All five days
1 person found this helpful

Hi Sir, I am 28 year old after sex my left side very pain and after sex I am frustrated and I am suffered kidney stones also please answer me I am very nervous.

MS(surgery), MCh(Urology)
Urologist, Jhansi
Get full clinical evaluation done for stone disease. This includes urine examination routine and microscopic along with the culture and sensitivity test done. Ultrasonography for kidney ,ureter, bladder. A functional study like IVP or CT Urography may also be required sometimes. Blood test for renal function should be done. Treatment as per your clincal evaluation.

I have pain in vagina and anus from today when start sex first time what I do. Is oral sex is good or not it effect.

Doctorate in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Hyderabad
It is normal to have pain in genitals when you have sex for first time. Do a lot of foreplay before penetrative sex. Oral sex is fine as long as you have a single and dependable partner.

Hello, Main apni wife se sex karta hun to usko bahot pain hota hai Aur kabhi to mujhe force karna padta hai Fir bhi bahot dard hota hai Please solution bataye Kya wife ko jabardasti aur bina mood ke sex Karne se pain hota hoga. Ya koi aur wajah hai?

Doctorate in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Hyderabad
Aap sex karne se pehle foreplay karna jaroori hain. Kam se kam bees minute foreplay karey. Phir jaake sex keejiyega. Aaapka problem ka solution mil jaayega.

Table of Content

What is the treatment?
How is the treatment done?
Who is eligible for the treatment? (When is the treatment done?)
Who is not eligible for the treatment?
Are there any side effects?
What are the post-treatment guidelines?
How long does it take to recover?
What is the price of the treatment in India?
Are the results of the treatment permanent?
What are the alternatives to the treatment?
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