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Hi, I keep getting one cranker sore after another. Once one heals up, I get another. Its really annoying now because I now just got one cranker sore and am getting a new one starting to come in. Why does this happen? What can I do. Does being iron deficiency anemia and Type 2 diabetes have something to do with this?

1 Doctor Answered
Hi,
I keep getting one cranker sore after another. Once o...
Most canker sores clear on their own in one to two weeks. Treatments, if required, include mouth rinses, pastes and medication.Possible triggers for canker sores include: A minor injury to your mouth from dental work, overzealous brushing, sports mishaps or an accidental cheek bite. ... An allergic response to certain bacteria in your mouth. Helicobacter pylori, the same bacteria that cause peptic ulcers.Stress on the tissues or any type of injury in the mouth can cause canker sores. Since the sores are actually tiny ulcers, they can be caused by any kind of hard brushing or eating something that can cause bruises or lead to tissue inflammation in the mouth.Baking soda is an alkaline and will neutralize acids that irritate the canker sore; it also helps kill bacteria to help your sore heal quickly. For a cure, try this home remedy: Rinse your mouth with a solution of 1 teaspoon baking soda in 1/2 cup of warm water Or Mix one teaspoon of salt in one cup of lukewarm water and stir it well. Use the solution to rinse your mouth. Swish the solution around for at least 30 seconds and then spit it out. ... After completing your rinse, put a pinch of salt directly on the canker sore. ...Repeat the process four or five times a day.
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