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Overview

Triglyd 300Mg Capsule

Manufacturer: Micro Labs Ltd
Medicine composition: Gemfibrozil
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Triglyd 300Mg Capsule is an oral drug belongs to the group of drugs called fibrates. It helps reduce the level of fatty acids and cholestrol in the blood. It is generally used for treatment of people with pancreatitis having high cholestrol and triglyceride levels. It is also used to lower risks of heart attack, strokes, and other heart complications in people with high levels of cholestrol and triglyceride.

It is advised that you consult a doctor before taking Triglyd 300Mg Capsule if you are pregnant or are likely to become pregnant, or you are breastfeeding. It should also be avoided if you have severe kidney disease, severe liver disease, gallbladder disease, or if you are taking a blood thinner like warfin, jantoven; or if you have a history of gallstones, or if you are allergic to it or any of its ingredients.

The reported side effects of Triglyd 300Mg Capsule are allergic reactions like swelling of lips, face, throat or tongue, jaundice, little or no urinating, eye pain, blurred vision, pale skin, unusual bleeding, rapid heart rate, upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, mild pain, constipation, diarrhoea, sneezing, sore throat, joint pain, mild itching, rashes, lack of interest in sex. You should visit your doctor immediately if you encounter any of the above mentioned conditions.

You should always consult a doctor regarding the dosage of Triglyd 300Mg Capsule and have it accordingly. It is taken in form of tablets to be consumed orally. Usually it is taken twice on a daily basis, half an hour before breakfast and dinner in a dosage of 600mg.

increased cholesterol levels in blood
increased triglycerides levels in blood
In addition to its intended effect, Triglyd 300Mg Capsule may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Increased liver enzymes
Flatulence.
Is It safe with alcohol?
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Lopid 300mg capsule may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Lopid 300mg capsule is probably unsafe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
Dizziness and visual disturbances can occur which may negatively influence driving.
Does this affect kidney function?
Should not be used in patients with severe renal impairment.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Triglyd 300Mg Capsule, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Cadila Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Pfizer Ltd
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Gemfibrozil, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double the dose.
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
Interaction with Medicine
GLI 2MG TABLET
LIPICURE 10MG TABLET
CYBLEX 40MG TABLET
ATORSAVE 20MG TABLET

Popular Questions & Answers

I am a 2nd stage diabetic patient having average 125 blood sugar, bp 90/140, cholesterol levels 200.

DM Cardiology
Cardiologist, Delhi
Dear,you need to reduce the cholesterol levels. High cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) what is hypercholesterolemia? hypercholesterolemia is a condition in which the level of cholesterol in your blood is high. When you have too much cholesterol, deposits of fat in the blood called plaque form inside blood vessel walls. The blood vessel walls thicken and become narrower (a condition called atherosclerosis). This change in the blood vessels reduces blood flow through the blood vessels, increasing your risk of heart disease and possibly leading to heart attacks or strokes. Cholesterol is a naturally occurring fatty substance. Your body needs small amounts of cholesterol to make and maintain nerve cells and to produce hormones. Most of the cholesterol in your blood is made by your liver from the fats, carbohydrates, and proteins you eat. You also get cholesterol by eating animal products such as meat, eggs, and dairy products. The two most important components of cholesterol are ldl (low-density lipoprotein) and hdl (high-density lipoprotein). Ldl and hdl carry cholesterol through your blood. Ldls carry a lot of cholesterol, leave behind fatty deposits on your artery walls, and contribute to heart disease. Hdls do the opposite. They clean the artery walls and remove extra cholesterol from the body, thus lowering the risk of heart disease. Ldl is called" bad" cholesterol. (you can think of" l" for" lousy" cholesterol.) hdl is called" good" cholesterol (think of" h" for" healthy" cholesterol). It is good to have low levels of ldl and high levels of hdl. How does high cholesterol occur? the main cause of high cholesterol is eating foods that are high in saturated fat or cholesterol. Other possible causes are? an inherited problem with the way your body processes cholesterol? a disease that raises the cholesterol level (for example, diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, liver disease, or hypothyroidism). What are the symptoms? high cholesterol is a silent disease. There are no symptoms until problems have already developed, such as the chest pain of a heart attack or calf pain with walking, caused by narrowed or blocked arteries to the legs. How is it diagnosed? you will have blood tests to check your cholesterol level. These lab tests usually measure your total cholesterol level as well as the levels of low-density lipoprotein (ldl), high-density lipoprotein (hdl), and triglycerides. You may need to fast before your blood test. This means you do not eat or drink anything except water for 12 hours before the test. Your health care provider may give you a physical exam. He or she may ask about your diet and diseases and health problems in your family. How is it treated? the goal of most cholesterol treatment is to decrease the ldl in your blood and to raise the hdl. For every 1% decrease in cholesterol level, your risk of heart disease is reduced 2%. A diet high in fiber and low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol can help to lower cholesterol levels. For more information on changes you can make in your diet, see health maintenance: controlling cholesterol. You will need to lose weight if you are overweight. You should also exercise as recommended by your health care provider. If diet and exercise are not enough to reduce your cholesterol level, your health care provider may prescribe drugs. Among the drugs commonly used are cholestyramine, niacin, gemfibrozil, atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and simvastatin. Each medicine has slightly different effects. Sometimes you will need to take more than one medicine to decrease your total cholesterol. Your health care provider will choose the best medicines for you. How can I take care of myself and prevent high cholesterol? in addition to changing your diet, you can help lower your cholesterol by the following? get more exercise, especially aerobic exercise. Ask your health care provider about an exercise prescription. Start slowly to avoid injury. Exercise helps raise hdl levels, improve circulation, decrease body fat, and tone muscles? don't smoke? maintain a normal weight? have your cholesterol levels and weight checked by your health care provider.
1 person found this helpful

I have undergone a mvp surgery, I do have cholestrol ( boderline) & thyroid. I do take thyronorm 75mgi/100mgi alternate days & daily. I do drink once or twice a week. Please Advice how do I control cholesterol & thyroid? Please Advice.

Critical Care Training, MD - Internal Medicine, MBBS
General Physician, Delhi
Continue thyronorm and recheck serum tsh after 3-4 weeks, adjust dose accordingly, after it stabilizes, we can do thyroid test every 3month, 6 month, annually etc. For cholesterol, first let us know report. Your weight?
1 person found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

Erectile dysfunction

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Mohali
Erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction

Alternative names
Impotence; ed
Erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction (ed), formerly called impotence, can affect men of all ages although it is much more common among older men. It is normal for healthy men of all ages to occasionally experience erectile dysfunction. However, if the problem becomes chronic, it can have adverse effects on relationships, emotional health, and self-esteem. Erectile dysfunction may also be a symptom of an underlying health condition. If erectile dysfunction becomes an on-going problem, it is important to talk to your doctor.

Causes of erectile dysfunction

Physical causes are the main reasons for erectile dysfunction. They include heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, neurological disease, medication side effects, and other health conditions.
Psychological causes of erectile dysfunction include anxiety, depression, stress, and problems in relationships.
Lifestyle factors that increase the risk for erectile dysfunction include smoking, alcohol use, and other substance abuse.
Introduction

Erectile dysfunction (formerly called impotence) is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficiently rigid for sexual intercourse. Sexual drive and the ability to have an orgasm are not necessarily affected. Because all men have erection problems from time to time, doctors diagnose erectile dysfunction if a man fails to maintain an erection satisfactory for intercourse on at least 25% of attempts.

Erectile dysfunction is not new in either medicine or human experience, but it is not easily or openly discussed. Cultural expectations of male sexuality inhibit many men from seeking help for a disorder that can usually benefit from medical treatment.

The penis and erectile function

The structure of the penis. The penis is composed of the following structures:

Two parallel columns of spongy tissue called the corpus cavernosa, or erectile bodies.
A central spongy chamber called the corpus spongiosum, which contains the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder through the penis.
These structures are made up of erectile tissue. Erectile tissue is rich in tiny pools of blood vessels called cavernous sinuses. Each of these vessels is surrounded by smooth muscles and supported by elastic fibrous tissue composed of a protein called collagen.

Erectile function and nitric oxide. The penis is either flaccid or erect depending on the state of arousal. In the flaccid, or unerect, penis, the following normally occurs:

Small arteries leading to the cavernous sinuses contract, reducing the inflow of blood.
The smooth muscles regulating the many tiny blood vessels also stay contracted, limiting the amount of blood that can collect in the penis.
During arousal, the following occurs:

The man's central nervous system stimulates the release of a number of chemicals, including nitric oxide, which is essential for producing and maintaining an erection.
Nitric oxide stimulates the production of cyclic GMP, a chemical that relaxes the smooth muscles in the penis. This allows blood to flow into the tiny pool-like cavernous sinuses, flooding the penis.
This increased blood flow nearly doubles the diameter of the spongy chambers.
The veins surrounding the chambers are squeezed almost completely shut by this pressure.
The veins are unable to drain blood out of the penis and so the penis becomes rigid and erect.
After ejaculation or climax, cyclic GMP is broken down by an enzyme called phosphodiesterase-5 (pde5), causing the penis to become flaccid (unerect) again.
Important substances for erectile health

A proper balance of certain chemicals, gases, and other substances is critical for erectile health.

Collagen. The protein collagen is the major component in structural tissue in the body, including in the penis. Excessive amounts, however, form scar tissue, which can impair erectile function.

Oxygen. Oxygen-rich blood is one of the most important components for erectile health. Oxygen levels vary widely from reduced levels in the flaccid state to very high in the erect state. During sleep, a man can normally have three to five erections per night, bringing oxygen-rich blood to the penis. The primary cause of oxygen deprivation is ischemia -- the blockage of blood vessels. The same blood flow-reducing conditions that lead to heart disease, such as atherosclerosis, may also contribute to erectile dysfunction.

Testosterone and other hormones. Normal levels of hormones, especially testosterone, are essential for erectile function, though their exact role is not clear.

Causes

Over the past decades, the medical perspective on the causes of erectile dysfunction has shifted. Common belief used to attribute almost all cases of ed to psychological factors. Now doctors believe that up to 85% of ed cases are caused by medical or physical problems. Only 15% are completely psychologically based. Sometimes, erectile dysfunction is due to a combination of physical and psychological causes.

A number of medical conditions share a common problem with erectile dysfunction -- the impaired ability of blood vessels to open and allow normal blood flow.

Heart disease, atherosclerosis, and high blood pressure

Heart disease, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol levels are major risk factors for erectile dysfunction. In fact, erectile problems may be a warning sign of these conditions in men at risk for atherosclerosis. Men who experience ed have a greater risk for angina, heart attack, or stroke.

Erectile dysfunction is a very common problem in men with high blood pressure. Many of the drugs used to treat hypertension (such as calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers) may also cause ed.

Diabetes

Diabetes is a major risk factor for erectile dysfunction. Blood vessel and nerve damage are both common complications of diabetes. When the blood vessels or nerves of the penis are involved, erectile dysfunction can result. Diabetes is also associated with heart disease and chronic kidney disease, other risk factors for ed.

Obesity

Obesity increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease, and erectile dysfunction.

Metabolic syndrome

Metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of conditions that includes obesity and abdominal fat, unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and insulin resistance -- is also a risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men older than 50 years.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia

Although benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH or 'enlarged prostate') does not cause erectile dysfunction, surgical and drug treatments for the condition can increase the risk for erectile dysfunction.

Neurologic conditions

Diseases that affect the central nervous system can cause erectile dysfunction. These conditions include Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke.

Endocrinologic and hormonal conditions

Low levels of the male hormone testosterone can be a contributing factor to erectile dysfunction in men who have other risk factors. (low testosterone as the sole cause of erectile dysfunction affects only about 5% of men. In general, low testosterone levels are more likely to reduce sexual desire than to cause ed.) abnormalities of the pituitary gland that cause high levels of the hormone prolactin are also associated with erectile dysfunction. Other hormonal and endocrinologic causes of erectile dysfunction include thyroid and adrenal gland problems.

Physical trauma and injury

Spinal cord injury and pelvic trauma, such as a pelvic fracture, can cause nerve damage that results in ed. Other conditions that can injure the spine and cause erectile dysfunction include spinal cord tumors, spina bifida, and a history of polio.

Surgery

Surgery for prostate diseases. Radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer often causes loss of sexual function but nerve-sparing surgical procedures reduce the risk of ed. (radiation treatments for prostate cancer also cause erectile dysfunction.) surgical treatments for BPH can also cause ed, but this complication is relatively uncommon.

Surgery for colon and rectal cancers. Surgical and radiation treatments for colorectal cancers can cause ed in some patients. In general, colostomy does not usually affect sexual function. However, wide rectal surgery can cause short-term or long-term sexual dysfunction.

Fistula surgery. Surgery to repair anal fistulas can affect the muscles that control the rectum (external anal sphincter muscles), sometimes causing ed. (repair of these muscles may restore erectile function.)

Orthopedic surgery. Erectile dysfunction can sometimes result from orthopedic surgery that affects pelvic nerves.

Note: vasectomy does not cause erectile dysfunction.

Medications

Many medications increase the risk for erectile dysfunction. They include:

High blood pressure medications, particularly diuretics, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers.
Heart or cholesterol medications such as digoxin, gemfibrozil, or clofibrate.
Finasteride (Proscar, generic) and dutasteride (Avodart), which are used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A lower-dose form of finasteride (Propecia), which is used to treat male pattern baldness, may also cause ed. Erectile dysfunction may persist even after these medications are stopped.
Psychotropic medication used to treat depression and bipolar disorder such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and lithium. Certain types of antipsychotic medication, such as phenothiazines (like Compazine) and butyrophenones (like haloperidol), can also cause erectile dysfunction.
Gastroesophagelal reflux disorder (gerd) medications, used to reduce stomach acids, such as rantidine (Zantac) and cimetidine (Tagamet).
Hormone drugs such as estrogens, corticosteroids, and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors.
Chemotherapy drugs such as methotrexate.
Psychological causes

Anxiety. Anxiety has both emotional and physical consequences that can affect erectile function. It is among the most frequently cited contributors to psychological ed.

Stress. Even simple stress can affect sexual dysfunction.

Depression. Depression can reduce sexual desire and is associated with erectile dysfunction.

Relationship problems. Troubles in relationships often have a direct impact on sexual functioning.

Risk factors

Age

For most men, erectile dysfunction is primarily associated with older age. Nevertheless, ed is not inevitable with age. Severe erectile dysfunction often has more to do with age-related disease than age itself. In particular, older men are more likely to have heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure than younger men. Such conditions and some of their treatments are causes of erectile dysfunction.

Lifestyle factors

Smoking. Smoking contributes to the development of erectile dysfunction, mainly because it increases the effects of other blood vessel disorders, including high blood pressure and atherosclerosis.

Alcohol use. Heavy drinking can cause erectile dysfunction. Alcohol depresses the central nervous system and impairs sexual function.

Drug abuse. Illicit drugs such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamines, and marijuana can affect sexual function.

Weight and sedentary lifestyle. Obesity is a risk factor for erectile dysfunction. Lack of exercise and a sedentary lifestyle can lead to obesity and other health problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

Diagnosis

The doctor typically interviews the patient about various physical and psychological factors and performs a physical exam.

Medical history

The doctor will ask about:

Past and present medical conditions, surgeries, and medications
Any history of psychological problems, including stress, anxiety, or depression
Lifestyle factors such as alcohol, drug, and dietary supplement use
In addition, the doctor will ask about your sexual history, which may include:

When problems with sexual function began
The frequency, quality, and duration of any erections, including erections that occur during sleep or on awakening in the morning
The specific circumstances when erectile dysfunction occurs
Details of sexual technique
Whether problems exist in the current relationship
If appropriate, the doctor may also interview the sexual partner.

Physical examination

The doctor will perform a physical exam, including examination of the genital area and a digital rectal examination (the doctor inserts a gloved and lubricated finger into the patient's rectum) to check for prostate abnormalities. It is important to check blood pressure and to evaluate circulation by checking pulses in the legs.

Laboratory tests

Because erectile dysfunction and atherosclerosis are often linked, it is important to check cholesterol levels. Similarly, the doctor may order tests for blood sugar (glucose) levels to check if diabetes is a factor. In some cases, blood tests may be used to measure testosterone levels to determine if there are hormone problems. The doctor may also screen for thyroid and adrenal gland dysfunction. For more sophisticated tests, the doctor may refer the patient to a urologist.

Treatment

Many physical and psychological situations can cause erectile dysfunction, and brief periods of ed are normal. Every man experiences erectile dysfunction from time to time. Nevertheless, if the problem is persistent, men should seek professional help, particularly since erectile dysfunction is usually treatable and may also be a symptom of an underlying health problem. It is important to treat any medical condition that may be causing erectile dysfunction.

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Table of Content

About Triglyd 300Mg Capsule
When is Triglyd 300Mg Capsule prescribed?
What are the side effects of Triglyd 300Mg Capsule?
Key highlights of Triglyd 300Mg Capsule
What are the substitutes for Triglyd 300Mg Capsule?
What are the dosage instructions?
What are the interactions for Triglyd 300Mg Capsule?