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Infant Diet Tips

Tips To Keep You And Your Infant Healthy

Dt. Sweta Shah 88% (25 ratings)
B.Sc - Home Science, MSc - Nutrition & Food Processing, MSc - Food Production Management
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Tips To Keep You And Your Infant Healthy

A good diet and great nourishment during pregnancy, and enough of it is very important for your infant to develop and grow. You need to take around 300 or more calories every day than you did before you get pregnant. In spite of the fact that sickness and nausea during the initial couple of months of pregnancy can make this troublesome for some women, one should attempt to ingest a wholesome diet and take pre-birth vitamins.

Here are a few suggestions to keep you and your infant healthy

 

 

  1. Lean meatThe amino acids in protein are the building blocks of each cell in your and your child's body. High-protein foods likewise keep your craving under control by settling your glucose. Glucose is the reason you need to go for three servings (that is around 75 grams) of protein every day. Lean meat is a superb alternative, since it is high in iron.
  2. High fiber food: Pick foods high in fiber that are enhanced, for example, whole grain breads, oats, beans, pasta and rice, and in addition foods grown from the ground. In spite of the fact that it is best to get your fiber from food, taking a fiber supplement can help you get bone strength and better digestion.
  3. Vitamins and minerals: Ensure you are getting enough vitamins and minerals in your everyday diet while pregnant. You should take a pre-birth vitamin supplement to ensure you are reliably getting enough vitamins and minerals consistently. Your specialist can suggest an over-the-counter brand or prescribe pre-birth vitamins.
  4. Calcium rich food: Eat and drink no less than four servings of dairy items and calcium-rich food a day to guarantee that you are getting 1000-1300 mg of calcium in your everyday diet during pregnancy.
  5. Iron rich food: Eat no less than three servings of iron-rich food, for example, lean meats, spinach, beans, and breakfast cereal every day to guarantee you are getting 27 mg of iron everyday.
  6. IodineWhile you're pregnant, you will require 220 micrograms of iodine a day to guarantee your infant's cerebrum and sensory system improvement. Consume milk and cheese.
  7. Avocados: These are stacked with potassium, vitamin C and vitamin B6 (helps in tissue and mind development and also reduces morning sickness). Avocados are a delightful approach to get your vitamins. Spread some avocado on your toast in place of cheese or mayonnaise.
  8. Oats: Oats are loaded with fiber, B vitamins, iron and a large group of different minerals. Along with other complex carbs, they are pressed with fiber (help in getting rid of constipation). Fill your breakfast dish with them, yet do not stop there — add oats to flapjacks, biscuits, cakes, treats, and even meatloaf.

Infant Colic And Treating With Homeopathy

Dr. Meeta Deshpande 93% (241 ratings)
BHMS, Diploma in Yoga Naturopathy
Homeopath, Thane
Infant Colic And Treating With Homeopathy

Infantile colic and often indicated homeopathic remedies. It’s also referred as crying baby syndrome.

For anyone with a baby suffering from this problem, it’s a reality that causes significant distress to the infant as well as parents, carers and siblings. A specific cause is as yet unknown and the symptoms involve excessive crying for more than three hours per day for more than three days per week in an infant who is otherwise (clinically) well and thriving. The infant may also have abdominal distension, flatus, borborygmus, a flushed face, clenched fists, may draw their knees up or arch their back, as if in pain. Colic may develop in the early weeks of life, peaking at around 2-8 weeks of age and ceasing by around 12 to 16 weeks but may, in rarer cases, persist for up to 12 months.

The symptoms may occur at any time but more typically arise in the late afternoon or evening. While fewer than 5% of colicky infants are found to have an organic disease, it’s important to differentiate colic from other causes of excessive crying such as constipation, infantile migraine, dairy, soy or some other form of allergy (where these may be associated with an aggravation of symptoms), gastro-oesophageal reflux (which may itself be secondary to dairy or soy allergy), or lactose overload / malabsorption (indicated by frothy watery diarrhoea with perianal excoriation). Other causes of persistent crying may include early teething, urinary tract infection, otitis media or raised intracranial pressure. 
There are a number of symptoms that, when combined with excessive crying, indicate the need for timely medical attention- these include a change in bowel habits, an abnormal temperature, persistent abdominal distenstion, an increase in crying frequency or lethargy.

Very few medications, from allopathic medicine have consistently been found to be effective for colic, but found to have serious side effects. In mothers who are breastfeeding, a maternal hypoallergenic diet, avoiding dairy products, eggs, wheat, or nuts, may improve matters. The rapid acting and low-risk features of homeopathic medicines can make them ideal for use with infants suffering from colic, and following are some of the most frequently prescribed.

Colocynthis: This is one of the most commonly used first-aid medicines for colic. Characteristically, the colic will cause the child to bring the knees up to the chest. Child will be irritable easily angered. There may be co-existing gastro-intestinal bloating, green spluttery diarrhoea, vomiting and a coated tongue. 

Chamomilla: Chamomilla is also a common prescription here. The child in this case usually hot, thirsty, has red cheeks and wants to be carried, cries inconsolably and may angrily reject things that are offered. In colic the appearance is typically one of vomiting, an arched back, restlessness, anger, and the infant is often teething at the same time. The stools may be green and smell of rotten eggs and there may be great abdominal distension with small quantities of flatus being passed. 


Nux vomica: Nux is often associated with nervousness, irritability, anger, as well as hypersensitivity to noise and light. In this instance, colic may arise 1 to 2 hours after feeding, and may be accompanied by retching or vomiting, constipation, flatulent distension of the abdomen, hunger, coating at the back of the tongue, or a stuffy nose

Mag phos: The mag phos infant may appear restless, weak and lethargic. There may be muscular spasms or twitching, teething, thirst for cold drinks, belching, constipation, bloating and flatulent colic that causes the child to bend double. 

Dioscorea: In this instance the infant will normally appear to be in severe pain and will exhibit borborygmi. They may be thirstless and have a coated tongue, yellowish diarrhoea and will often belch offensive gas. They will commonly arch their back and may have a history of digestive weakness. 

Pulsatilla: The pulsatilla child is usually sensitive, gentle, weepy and thirstless, despite still wanting the comfort of the breast or bottle, and wants to be held or rocked. They’re frequently seen sleeping with their hands above their heads. Attacks of colic may be aggravated by emotional stress

Bryonia alba: Indicated when symptoms develop slowly, irritability, an abdomen sensitive to touch, dry mucous membranes, a yellowish or brown coated tongue, constipation or the passing of large, dry stools, lethargy and a thirst for large amounts of liquid. Food or drink may be vomited soon after consuming it and the infant usually dislikes being carried or raised.

Carbo vegetabilis: Carbo veg is a common prescription for colic pains associated with bloating, offensive belching, and offensive flatulence. The child may appear weak or listless with a puffy face, the rate of respiration is often increased, the tongue may be coated white or yellowish and the skin may feel cold and have a bluish hue. 

Ignatia: This is often indicated where the mother has unresolved grief. The infant in this case may exhibit hyper-acuity of the senses, may be easily excited, apprehensive, moody, rigid and nervous. 

Lycopodium: The lycopodium infant may appear to be thin, weak, anxious, sensitive and apprehensive. Symptoms are worse in the late afternoon or early evening, and better from motion and after midnight.

Lastly, potency and dosage and medicine depends on age of the baby symptomatology and few other factors. It should be taken only as prescribed by homeopathic practitioner only.

4 people found this helpful

DIARRHOEA in infants

Dr. Pranali 88% (166 ratings)
Homeopath,
DIARRHOEA in infants

Infants Topic Diarrhoea

 

When if one frequently passes watery stool that have no lumps in them look out for other symptoms of diarrhoea. These can include vomiting, fever, and sometimes blood or mucus in your baby's stool


 

Newborns pass stool freq, so you may worry that your baby has diarrhoea when in fact one pass stool that are normal for her age.

Also, how often your baby does a stool will depend on whether she's being breast or formula-fed.


 

Here are more signs of normal motion:

  1. The stool of breastfed newborn babies is usually yellowish and on the soft or liquid side. Your baby may fill nappy up to five times daily.

  2. Sometimes a breastfed baby will pass motion during or immediately after each breastfeeding session. This happens because as her stomach fills up, the milk stimulates her entire intestinal tract, prompting a bowel movement.


 

Within a month, most breastfed babies do one or two poos a day.


Causes of diarrhoea?

The most common cause of diarrhoea is a virus called rotavirus

Rotavirus causes an infection of the gut called gastroenteritis. The infection damages the inner lining of your baby's intestine, allowing fluid to leak and food to pass through without any nutrients being absorbed. In some cases, rotavirus can lead to a serious bowel infection and dehydration.


 

A vaccine against rotavirus will be offered as part of your baby's routine immunisations when she is eight weeks and again when she is 12 weeks.


 

Diarrhoea can also be caused by:

  1. Allergies (find out more about milk allergy and intolerance and food allergies)

  2. Antibiotics

  3. Food poisoning

  4. Enzyme deficiencies, although these are rare


 

How should care during baby's diarrhoea?

  1. Make sure that your baby drinks plenty of fluids to help ease her symptoms and prevent dehydration.

  2. If your baby is taking breast or formula feeds best than

  3. You can try your baby with sips of oral rehydration solution (ors) a few times an hour.

  4. An ors helps to replace the fluids and salts your baby loses because of the diarrhoea. Keep giving water and usual breastfeeds

  5. Don’t give her fruit juices, glucose drinks and fizzy drinks. Unabsorbed sugar draws water into the intestine and can make diarrhoea worse

  6. Don’t give your baby anti-diarrhoeal medicine. It must not be given to children under 12 years old, as it could cause serious side-effects

  7. To prevent your baby passing on her diarrhoea to other children, keep her away from childcare or nursery until at least 48 hours after her last diaeroohea


 

Breastfed babies less likely to get diarrhoea?

Yes. Certain elements in breastmilk can inhibit the growth of the germs that cause diarrhoea


 

Should stop giving solid foods in diaerrohea?

  1. No. If your child is six months or older, unless she is vomiting frequently, you can still give her solids.

  2. You could try foods such as bananas, rice, apple puree, and dry toast if your baby has recently started solids.

  3. For an older toddler you could try small amounts of chicken and starchy foods, such as mashed potatoes and pasta.

  4. But don't worry doesn't want to eat. It's more important that drinks to avoid dehydration


 

When should call the doctor?

Diarrhoea can be worrying if it lasts for more than a few hours, but it will usually clear up on its own. If your child has loose, watery stools for more than a couple of days, call your doctor


 

The biggest concern with diarrhoea is fluid loss, so don't delay in showing your pedatiaric if your baby shows these signs:

  1. Dry skin or lips

  2. Listlessness

  3. Tearless crying

  4. A sunken fontanelle

  5. Discoloured hands and feet

  6. Strong yellow motion

  7. Fewer wet nappies than usual


 

Shows the following secondary symptoms:

  1. Vomiting which lasts more than 24 hours

  2. Fever that lasts longer than 24 hours

  3. Refusal to drink

  4. Blood in motion

  5. A swollen tummy


 

How to decrease baby’s discomfort?

Cuddle and comfort as much as possible, and keep her dry. Use care and tenderness when changing nappies since it's easy for a baby's bottom to become sore with diarrhoea. Use a barrier cream to prevent irritation if the diarrhoea lasts more than a day.


 

How prevent baby from getting diarrhoea again?

Proper hygiene can help reduce the chance of diarrhoea, because the germs that cause it can be easily passed from hand to mouth. So wash your hands thoroughly with soap after handling soiled nappies or using the toilet.

43 people found this helpful

Homeopathy Nurtures Mother And Infant!

Dr. Rashid Akhtar 89% (164 ratings)
MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Greater Noida
Homeopathy Nurtures Mother And Infant!

When you are becoming a mother, then a great deal of special attention needs to be paid towards you and the baby. At such a delicate juncture in life, you cannot risk the health of the baby and the mother by resorting to conventional medicine system that comes bundled with plenty of side effects. Listed below are a few reasons why you should opt for a homeopathic system of medication.

  • It is completely safe as it has no side effects
  • Homeopathic medicines are mostly prepared from non-toxic substances such as plants
  • The medicine works by stimulating the body's own immune and healing systems
  • Homeopathy not only targets one ailment but the overall well-being of the body

For the Mother

  • Wound healing - After you deliver a baby, your body has a lot of internal bleeding and wounds that require special medical care. Here homeopathy comes to the rescue using Arnica Montana, which is one of the most popular agents that help in healing.
  • Breast problems - Homeopathy is quite useful in treating a lot of breast related conditions like mastitis, cracked nipples, breast lumps and such others. In this condition a homeopathic medicine called Phytolacca Decandra can help treat such issues.
  • Baby blues - It refers to periods of low moods and depressions that happen after conceiving a baby. In this case, the homeopathic medicine Pulsatilla helps you to revive your mood.
  • For the Baby
  • Teething - Teething is the stage when the baby tends to develop his or her baby teeth. It is identified by a baby with bright red cheek crying due to discomfort.
  • Sleep - Uneven sleeping pattern of babies is also a common problem which causes them discomfort and irritation which makes them cry at times.
  • Immunization - It is known that homeopathic medicine mostly focuses on the overall betterment of the human body.

Therefore, taking homeopathic remedies also fortifies your immune system thus helping the baby fight ailments in an efficient and effective manner. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3640 people found this helpful

Infant Cradle Cap - How You Can Get Rid of Them?

Dr. C M Guri 88% (452 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Dermatology, Diploma in Aesthetic Mesotherapy
Dermatologist, Gurgaon
Infant Cradle Cap - How You Can Get Rid of Them?

Cradle cap is a slick, yellow scaling or crusting on a child's scalp. It is regular in children and can be effortlessly treated. Cradle cap is not a part of any ailment and does not indicate poor care of the child. It is the usual development of sticky skin oils, scales, and sloughed skin cells. It is not harmful to your child and generally leaves by an infant's first birthday. Some of the recommended ways to treat cradle cap are listed below:

  1. Baby shampoo: Shampoo might be the absolute best approach to treat cradle caps in babies. Regular shampooing can get rid of a flakey scalp and make it a smooth one. Abstain from getting the shampoo in your child's eyes. In case you are uncertain about using it, ask a doctor or specialist for guidance. Do not utilize shampoos that contain groundnut oil or shelled nut oil on children under five years of age.

  2. Olive oil: Olive or almond oil is regularly used to heal cradle cap. Try rubbing it on the infant’s hair and give it a chance to sit for some time, then delicately rub with a soft toothbrush.

  3. Coconut oil: Every mother uses coconut oil for many reasons. It is the most effective treatment. It smells astounding as well. Put a little on your child's head every evening and wash it over the next morning with an infant brush.

  4. Vaseline: A considerable number of mothers use Vaseline. Apply it on the hair around evening time and by morning, the cradle cap will be a little improved.

  5. Fine-toothed comb: This is a lice brush and is very useful. However, with a little oil, this is most likely one of the least demanding and quickest approaches to evacuate those flakes.

  6. Shea butter: Applying Shea butter on the scalp is a great approach. Rub it on the hair, then brush it off gradually. It brings about the ideal result, as indicated by a few mothers.

Home treatment is normally all that is required for support. Here is how one needs to do it:

  1. An hour prior to shampooing, rub your child's scalp with infant oil petroleum gel to lift the coverings and flakey scales.

  2. Before applying the shampoo, first get the scalp wet, then tenderly rub the scalp with a delicate swarm brush (a delicate toothbrush would work too) for a couple of minutes to remove the scales. You can attempt to tenderly remove the flakes with extreme attention to detail.

  3. At that point, wash the scalp with baby shampoo, flush well, and tenderly towel dry.

In case that your child's cradle cap gets to be swollen or infected, a course of anti-infection agents or an antifungal cream or cleanser such as ketoconazole might be recommended by a specialist. A gentle steroid cream such as  hydrocortisone may likewise be suggested for an irritant rash.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2619 people found this helpful

Myth- Infant formula is basically the same as breast milk

Dr. Sangita Malhotra 88% (359 ratings)
MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Agra
Myth- Infant formula is basically the same as breast milk
Fact-infant formula isn't the same as breast milk. It' s not a living product, so it doesn't have the antibodies, living cells, enzymes or hormones that protect your baby from infections & diseases in childhood & also later in life.
12 people found this helpful

Tongue movement influences infant speech perception

Dr. P Nagaraj 90% (3801 ratings)
FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai

Free tongue movement in pre-verbal infants influences their perception.says Canadian researchers.

The results showed a teether inserted into the mouth of an infant has an impact on the tongue tip and blade movement influencing speech perception.


Speech perception is available even before infants accrue experience producing speech sounds.

1 person found this helpful

Take Care of Your Child's Diet

Dr. Ramakanth Reddy 89% (153 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

Making appropriate food choices for your baby during the first year of life is very important. More growth occurs during the first year than at any other time in your child's life. It's important to feed your baby a variety of healthy foods at the proper time. Starting good eating habits at this early stage will help set healthy eating patterns for life.

Recommended feeding guide for the first year

Don't give solid foods unless your child's health care provider advises you to do so. Solid foods should not be started before age 4 months because:

  • Breast milk or formula provides your baby all the nutrients that are needed for growth.
  • Your baby isn't physically developed enough to eat solid food from a spoon.
  • Feeding your baby solid food too early may lead to overfeeding and being overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all infants, children, and adolescents take in enough vitamin D through supplements, formula, or cow's milk to prevent complications from deficiency of this vitamin. In November 2008, the AAP updated its recommendations for daily intake of vitamin D for healthy infants, children, and adolescents. It is now recommended that the minimum intake of vitamin D for these groups should be 400 IU per day, beginning soon after birth. Your baby's health care provider can recommend the proper type and amount of vitamin D supplement for your baby.

Guide for formula feeding (0 to 5 months)

Age

Amount of formula per feeding

Number of feedings per 24 hours

1 month

2 to 4 ounces

6 to 8 times

2 months

5 to 6 ounces

5 to 6 times

3 to 5 months

6 to 7 ounces

5 to 6 times

Feeding tips for your child

These are some things to consider when feeding your baby:

  • When starting solid foods, give your baby one new food at a time — not mixtures (like cereal and fruit or meat dinners). Give the new food for 3 to 5 days before adding another new food. This way you can tell what foods your baby may be allergic to or can't tolerate.
  • Begin with small amounts of new solid foods — a teaspoon at first and slowly increase to a tablespoon.
  • Begin with dry infant rice cereal first, mixed as directed, followed by vegetables, fruits, and then meats.
  • Don't use salt or sugar when making homemade infant foods. Canned foods may contain large amounts of salt and sugar and shouldn't be used for baby food. Always wash and peel fruits and vegetables and remove seeds or pits. Take special care with fruits and vegetables that come into contact with the ground. They may contain botulism spores that cause food poisoning.
  • Infant cereals with iron should be given to your infant until your infant is age 18 months.
  • Cow's milk shouldn't be added to the diet until your infant is age 1. Cow's milk doesn't provide the proper nutrients for your baby.
  • The AAP recommends not giving fruit juices to infants younger than age 6 months. Only pasteurized, 100% fruit juices (without added sugar) may be given to older infants and children, and should be limited to 4 ounces a day. Dilute the juice with water and offer it in a cup with a meal.
  • Feed all food with a spoon. Your baby needs to learn to eat from a spoon. Don't use an infant feeder. Only formula and water should go into the bottle.
  • Avoid honey in any form for your child's first year, as it can cause infant botulism.
  • Don't put your baby in bed with a bottle propped in his or her mouth. Propping a bottle has been linked to an increased risk of ear infections. Once your baby's teeth are present, propping the bottle can also cause tooth decay. There is also a risk of choking.
  • Help your baby to give up the bottle by his or her first birthday.
  • Avoid the "clean plate syndrome." Forcing your child to eat all the food on his or her plate even when he or she isn't hungry isn't a good habit. It teaches your child to eat just because the food is there, not because he or she is hungry. Expect a smaller and pickier appetite as the baby's growth rate slows around age 1.
  • Infants and young children shouldn't eat hot dogs, nuts, seeds, round candies, popcorn, hard, raw fruits and vegetables, grapes, or peanut butter. These foods aren't safe and may cause your child to choke. Many health care providers suggest these foods be saved until after your child is age 3 or 4. Always watch a young child while he or she is eating. Insist that the child sit down to eat or drink.
  • Healthy infants usually require little or no extra water, except in very hot weather. When solid food is first fed to your baby, extra water is often needed.
  • Don't limit your baby's food choices to the ones you like. Offering a wide variety of foods early will pave the way for good eating habits later.
  • Fat and cholesterol shouldn't be restricted in the diets of very young children, unless advised by your child's health care provider. Children need calories, fat, and cholesterol for the development of their brains and nervous systems, and for general growth.

Feeding guide for the first year (4 to 8 months)

Item

4 to 6 months

7 months

8 months

Breastfeeding or formula

4 to 6 feedings per day or 28 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. single grain cereal mixed with formula

Fruits

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

Vegetables

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained, mashed, soft/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

 

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

 

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Snacks

 

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt

Development

Make first cereal feedings very soupy and thicken slowly.

Start finger foods and cup.

Formula intake decreases; solid foods in diet increase.

Feeding guide for the first year (9 to 12 months)

Item

9 months

10 to 12 months

Breastfeeding or formula

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 4 feedings per day or 24 to 30 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

5 to 8tbs. any variety mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. any variety mixed with formula per day

Fruits

2 to 4 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed or strained, cooked/2 times per day

Vegetables

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

2 to 3 tbs. of tender, chopped/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., finely chopped, table meats, fish without bones, mild cheese/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Starches

 

1/4-1/2 cup mashed potatoes, macaroni, spaghetti, bread/2 times per day

Snacks

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans, cottage cheese, ice cream, pudding, dry cereal

Development

Eating more table foods. Make sure diet has good variety.

Baby may change to table food. Baby will feed himself or herself and use a spoon and cup.

4 people found this helpful

Protecting infants from abuse - Healthy Sex Talk with Kids of ages 1-5

Dr. Sangita Malhotra 88% (359 ratings)
MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Agra
Protecting infants from abuse - Healthy Sex Talk with Kids of ages 1-5
1. Teach children to ask permission before touching or embracing a playmate. Use language such as, “Sarah, let’s ask Joe if he would like to hug bye-bye.”
If Joe says “no” to this request, cheerfully tell your child, “That’s okay, Sarah! Let’s wave bye-bye to Joe and blow him a kiss.”
2. Help create empathy within your child by explaining how something they have done may have hurt someone. Use language like, “I know you wanted that toy, but when you hit Rohan, it hurt him and he felt very sad. And we don’t want Rohan to feel sad because we hurt him.”
Encourage your child to imagine how he or she might feel if Rohan had hit them, instead. This can be done with a loving tone and a big hug, so the child doesn’t feel ashamed or embarrassed.
3. Teach kids to help others who may be in trouble. Talk to kids about helping other children*, and alerting trusted grown-ups when others need help.
Ask your child to watch interactions and notice what is happening. Get them used to observing behavior and checking in on what they see.
Use the family pet as an example, “Oh, it looks like the cat's tail is stuck! We have to help her!!”
Praise your child for assisting others who need help, but remind them that if a grown-up needs help with anything, that it is a grown-up’s job to help. Praise your child for alerting you to people who are in distress, so that the appropriate help can be provided.
4. Teach your kids that “no” and “stop” are important words and should be honored. One way to explain this may be, “Smriti said ‘no’, and when we hear ‘no’ we always stop what we’re doing immediately. No matter what.”
Also teach your child that his or her “no’s” are to be honored. Explain that just like we always stop doing something when someone says “no”, that our friends need to always stop when we say “no”, too. If a friend doesn’t stop when we say “no,” then we need to think about whether or not we feel good, and safe, playing with them. If not, it’s okay to choose other friends.
If you feel you must intervene, do so. Be kind, and explain to the other child how important “no” is. Your child will internalize how important it is both for himself and others.
5. Encourage children to read facial expressions and other body language: Scared, happy, sad, frustrated, angry and more. Charade-style guessing games with expressions are a great way to teach children how to read body language.
6. Never force a child to hug, touch or kiss anybody, for any reason. If Grandma is demanding a kiss, and your child is resistant, offer alternatives by saying something like, “Would you rather give Grandma a high-five or blow her a kiss, maybe?”
You can always explain to Grandma, later, what you’re doing and why. But don’t make a big deal out of it in front of your kid. If it’s a problem for Grandma, so be it, your job now is doing what’s best for your child and giving them the tools to be safe and happy, and help others do the same.
7. Encourage children to wash their own genitals during bath time. Of course parents have to help sometimes, but explaining to little Joe that his penis is important and that he needs to take care of it is a great way to help encourage body pride and a sense of ownership of his or her own body.
Also, model consent by asking for permission to help wash your child’s body. Keep it upbeat and always honor the child’s request to not be touched.
“Can I wash your back now? How about your feet? How about your bottom?” If the child says “no” then hand them the washcloth and say, “Cool! Your booty needs a wash. Go for it.”
8. Give children the opportunity to say yes or no in everyday choices, too. Let them choose clothing and have a say in what they wear, what they play, or how they do their hair. Obviously, there are times when you have to step in (dead of winter when your child wants to wear a sundress would be one of those times!), but help them understand that you heard his or her voice and that it mattered to you, but that you want to keep them safe and healthy.
9. Allow children to talk about their body in any way they want, without shame. Teach them the correct words for their genitals, and make yourself a safe place for talking about bodies and sex.
Say, “I’m so glad you asked me that!” If you don’t know how to answer their questions the right way just then, say, “I’m glad you’re asking me about this, but I want to look into it. Can we talk about it after dinner?” and make sure you follow up with them when you say you will.
If your first instinct is to shush them or act ashamed, then practice it alone or with a partner. The more you practice, the easier it will be.
10. Talk about “gut feelings” or instincts. Sometimes things make us feel weird, or scared, or yucky and we don’t know why. Ask your child if that has ever happened with them and listen quietly as they explain.
Teach them that this “belly voice” is sometimes correct, and that if they ever have a gut feeling that is confusing, they can always come to you for help in sorting through their feelings and making decisions. And remind them that no one has the right to touch them if they don’t want it.
11. “Use your words.” Don’t answer and respond to temper tantrums. Ask your child to use words, even just simple words, to tell you what’s going on.
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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SID) - 5 Ways To Prevent It!

Dr. Amrapali Dixit 89% (35 ratings)
MD, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SID) - 5 Ways To Prevent It!

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SID) refers to the unexplained and sudden death of a seemingly hale and hearty baby. This condition tends to occur when the baby is asleep and that's why it's also known as crib death. Although the reason for the condition is still not known, many experts have attributed the cause of the condition to abnormal development in the parts of the baby's brain that oversees breathing and awakening from sleep. Nonetheless, there are ways that can prevent the problem from occurring and which are:

  • Always place your baby on the back to sleep - Sleeping on the back is the safest position that your baby should be in, whenever he or she sleeps. You shouldn't let your child sleep on the sides as he or she can roll onto the stomach, and may hamper the breathing process. You can place your baby on the stomach when he or she is awake.
  • Place your baby on a firm surface to sleep sans of any objects - It's best to place your baby on a firm mattress to sleep while avoiding thick and feather padding like a thick comforter. At the same time, objects like toys, stuffed animals or pillows should be removed from the crib as they may get in the way of your child's breathing by pressing on his or her face.
  • Make sure your baby doesn't become very hot - For keeping your baby warm during sleep, it's best to opt for sleep clothing or blanket made of light material so that it doesn't make him or her feel very hot. If using a blanket, it should be placed loosely over the baby and one should also remember to not cover the baby's head during sleep.
  • Use a pacifier - Research suggests that the use of the pacifier can reduce a baby's chance of dying from SIDS. This is because the pacifier helps in preventing the baby from rolling over onto his or her stomach during sleep. At the same time, it's also believed that the instrument helps in keeping the baby's tongue positioned in a manner that keeps his or her airways open.
  • Breastfeed your baby - breastfeeding your baby for a minimum of 6 months can help in preventing the occurrence of SIDS. Several studies have revealed this beneficial aspect of breastfeeding. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.
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