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Vasectomy Health Feed

Vasectomy - Know Misconceptions About It!

Vasectomy - Know Misconceptions About It!

Vasectomy is synonymous with sterilizations and is one of the most stress-free procedures for couples who want to limit their chances of pregnancy and childbirth. It is a process that has been perfected over the years and is still the most reliable method to avoid impregnation. However, there are still some myths and allegories associated with it. Though these have considerably reduced in the modern age, there are still some pockets of the world where this is prevalent. Come, let us take a look at some misconceptions and myths regarding vasectomy and the actual truth behind them.

Myth 1: Your sexual performance gets affected.
This is one of the most common misconceptions that are associated with a vasectomy. This is the number one reason why many men are hesitant to go for it fearing that their sex life could get hindered leading to nonperformance.

Truth: This is incorrect. The idea behind a vasectomy is to avoid pregnancy, and there is no reason as to why it would hamper your sex life. You will be able to lead an active sex life, and semen production will also be normal.

Myth 2: Testosterone production will be nil after vasectomy
Sperms are made in the testicles, and hence this myth came into existence that once a vasectomy is performed, you would be unable to produce any sperms and testosterone.

Truth: The simple truth is the myth is entirely baseless. Your sperm production is never eliminated and only your tube for the distribution of sperms is closed by a vasectomy. Hence it in no way affects your sperm production. A vasectomy does not have any effect on the production of testosterone.

Myth 3: Vasectomies stops sperm production
Many people assume fertility with sperm production. Hence once a vasectomy procedure eliminates the fertility aspect your sperm production automatically stops.

Truth: No. This is incorrect. Vasectomies never stop sperm production. They only restrict the sperms from entering into the semen. Sperms have a lifespan of about four days. Hence it is only natural that they are removed and replaced.

Myth 4: You are completely sterile post the surgery
It is easy to assume that you are sterile after you have the surgery. There is no way that having sex can lead to a pregnancy.

Truth: While there is a lot of truth in the above, there can be some instances of live sperms below the procedure point. The complete process of sterility can take about 4 to 5 weeks to occur and for all the sperms to get relinquished. Hence it is safe to not have sex for these weeks. It is also safe to get a semen analysis post the surgery.

Myth 5: Vasectomies are foolproof sterility methods
The high success rates in the procedure have made everyone believe that vasectomy is the sure shot to infertility. It is also 100% efficient.

Truth: While it is true that a vasectomy has a high success rate it is certainly not 100%. There can be instances where there are failures in a vasectomy, and this will not curtail your sterility. There are even known cases when couples have been able to conceive even after a vasectomy. Though the chances are extremely high of becoming sterile, the procedure is not foolproof.

Dear madam/sir. I got vasectomy in 2009, after long time in 2017 I gone for reversal vasectomy, my recent semen analysis reports showing results as" azoospermia" I would like to take "himalaya speman" to overcome azoospermia, please let me know whether my decision is good or bad. Can I take speman capsule.

Dear madam/sir.
I got vasectomy in 2009, after long time in 2017 I gone for reversal vasectomy, my recent semen analy...
Hello Mr Shekhar, it is unlikely that any medication would help you, as there are good chances of the reversal failure, so even if your testicles ARE producing sperms, they wont be able to pass into your semen, I suggest assisted reproductive techniques, if you are planning for a baby.
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I am 34 male. I have two children. I want to go for vasectomy. But I have erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation problem. Will be there any problem after vasectomy?

I am 34 male. I have two children. I want to go for vasectomy. But I have erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculat...
vasectomy is a surgical procedure to makes a manpermanently unable to get a woman pregnant. so no problems after vasectomy.
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I want to do vasectomy operation Want to know more about the same Will it affect pleasure?

I want to do vasectomy operation Want to know more about the same Will it affect pleasure?
Vasectomy is a sterilization procedure, todays date there are scar less surgery available (NSV) after that you can not reverse this. But sexual life is normal but before goes for this you should prepare your mind.
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The Pros And Cons Of Having A Vasectomy

The Pros And Cons Of Having A Vasectomy

The Pros and Cons of Having a Vasectomy

When guys reach that point in their lives when they know they don't want children (or they have plenty of them and don't want more!), they often choose to undergo a vasectomy. Most men who undergo the procedure have no lingering effects and often are happy with the results. But there are some terrified of undergoing any sort of procedure, worried about a penis injury happening when they get a vasectomy. The truth is that there are pros and cons to the procedure, and every man needs to know what those are in order to make an informed decision.

The pros of vasectomy:

Any man who wants to have a vasectomy must understand what he will benefit from the procedure. Here are some of the reasons many men choose to do it:

1) No more kids. The most obvious "pro" of vasectomy is that it prevents a man from fathering children. In the world of birth control, this is almost as close as a guy can get to not having that particular responsibility.

2) The procedure is quick. The procedure is a "one and done" situation - a guy goes in, gets a snip, and is out of the doctor's office within an hour or so. This one simple procedure is all he needs.

3) Recovery is quick, too. Most men are told to take it easy on the couch for a few days. He might have some soreness for a few weeks, as well as bruising, but within a month or so he's right as rain.

4) No more condoms. It usually takes about 20 ejaculations for a guy to rid his body of all semen and thus be fine with not using a condom while having sex. As long as he's in a monogamous relationship, he can enjoy the freedom of unprotected sex without worry.

5) No pressure on a partner. Some men find themselves with a partner who can't use certain birth control methods. By getting a vasectomy, he relieves his partner of the responsibility of figuring out birth control.

The cons of vasectomy:

Though there are many pros to the procedure, there are some risks that men need to carefully consider.

1) It's a surgical procedure. Even though the procedure has been used for a long time and has been perfected by numerous doctors, there is still a risk anytime someone uses a scalpel on a delicate area. Though rare, some men have reported problems that lingered after the surgery.

2) No protection from sexually transmitted infections. Many men had the best of both worlds when they used condoms: The protection from pregnancy and from infections. However, a man who has a vasectomy still has to use a condom if he doesn't have a steady, monogamous partner.

3) Reversal can be tough. Though the procedure for vasectomy is quick and easy, reversing it is much more involved. If a man changes his mind and decides he really does want to have more children, it will be an uphill battle to make it happen.

4) Sometimes it doesn't work. In a small percentage of men, the vasectomy doesn't "take." This means that a guy who had a vasectomy could wind up with a surprise baby a few years down the road.

5) Some men feel regret. Though most men who undergo the procedure are happy with the outcome, some men are deeply affected by the fact that they are no longer fertile. This can lead to depression and related problems, which can affect every part of a man's life.

The decision to have a vasectomy is a very important one that a man should never take lightly. Before the procedure and after, he should pay close attention to his penis health, including the use of a good penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). A crème that contains L-carnitnine can help protect the nerves of the penis; L-arginine can help ensure blood flow stays ample. Shea butter and vitamin E, both known for their healing properties, are also great for a man recovering from a vasectomy.

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Vasectomy Reversal

Vasectomy Reversal

So You're Thinking About a Vasectomy Reversal?

So, you've had a vasectomy and are now thinking about having it reversed. For one reason or another, you thought that a vasectomy would be a great idea and would protect against unwanted pregnancies. Sure it made sense at the time, but now you wish that you never had it in the first place. Well, congratulations! You are now part of a very large group of men who have come to hate the very thing that they thought they would enjoy so much.

Don't get me wrong, I believe that getting a vasectomy done is a great idea. It can protect you, your assets, and your reputation from being ruined or destroyed. However, times change, and as the years go by, what you may want out of life may change. What you wanted ten or fifteen years ago may be greatly different from what you want now.

For the most part, men who want to have their vasectomy reversed are looking for one thing - to start a family. And how can you start a family if your equipment isn't working properly? In short, you can't, or you have a very, very low chance of doing so (less than 0.1%). So what do you do in this situation? You start researching how to get a vasectomy reversal, and that might lead you here.

In the surgery the doctor will decide on which type of reversal will be done, in most cases either a vasovasostomy or a vasoepididymostomy. In either case, the main objective is to reconnect the detached ends of the vas deferens tube. The main difference between the two is that a vasoepididymostomy has a much lower chance of being successful.

If you do decide to have the surgery done, the recovery period is very similar to that of a vasectomy surgery. In most cases, you will be advised not to have sex for around 2-4 weeks and you will be able to return to normal activity within a few days. You will be advised to avoid getting your scrotum wet, and within a few months and after a few sessions of semen analysis, you will be told whether or not if the surgery was a success.

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Protecting Penis Health After a Vasectomy - Pre-Op Advice and Tips

Protecting Penis Health After a Vasectomy - Pre-Op Advice and Tips

Protecting Penis Health After a Vasectomy - Pre-Op Advice and Tips


There comes a point in a man's life where perhaps he has had all the children he wants to have - or maybe he is sure that kids are just not on the table for him - and he starts kicking around the idea of under "going the knife." While a vasectomy may seem like a pretty straightforward procedure, it certainly isn't something to be taken lightly. See what other men are wondering about the procedure and learn the risks, benefits and how to ensure adequate penis care, both pre- and post-vasectomy.

So, it's 100% effective, right?

As the old saying goes, nothing in this world is guaranteed except death and taxes, and a vasectomy falls into the category of almost being a sure thing. The fact of the matter is, about 0.2% (or 2 out of 1000) of men who have undergone the procedure experience ongoing fertility, even several months after the surgery has been completed. This occurs either because of human error during surgery, or because the cut ends actually reconnect and heal themselves after the procedure has been done. Additionally, some men (1 in 2000) have a spontaneous recurrence of fertility months or even years after the procedure proved them sterile. All men should get a semen test several months after the procedure to ensure that it worked - men who are worried about spontaneous recurrence of fertility can get their semen tested at any time to ensure sterility has remained, though it is very rare after a negative test. It is also important to know that it takes a while for a man to completely go through his stores of semen in the body, therefore, condoms should be used for a few months after the procedure until that negative test has been confirmed by a doctor.

Is it permanent? What if my wife changes her mind about kids?

If there is even the slightest thought that kids could be in the future, a delay on the big V should be strongly considered. Though the procedure can occasionally be reversed years later, the surgery to reinstate fertility is only roughly 50% successful. Therefore, most doctors recommend a man consider it a permanent procedure.

What are the risks?

Breathe a sigh of relief, guys, there are typically no reported changes to a man's sex drive, erectile strength, orgasm, or ejaculation after the procedure. The biggest risk tends to be men ditching the rubbers too soon after the procedure, leading to an unwanted pregnancy. Of course, any surgery comes with risk; however, serious complications occur in less than 1% of vasectomies.

Does it hurt?

Most men find the procedure to be mildly uncomfortable, while some men indicate zero pain at all. Of course, everybody reacts to anesthetic and surgical procedures differently, so results vary for each man. Healing is generally quick, and most men require nothing more than an over the counter medication for pain or swelling.

A guy can go condom-free after a vasectomy, right?

A man in a monogamous, long-term relationship where both partners have been screened for sexually transmitted infections can finally ditch those condoms. However, a vasectomy does not protect either partner from infections, so if a guy has multiple partners, he needs to keep the condoms handy.

Keeping the penis healthy

Regardless of a man's surgery plans, he needs to keep the penis healthy to maintain the best possible sex life. One important way to do this is by stepping up the hygiene routine - as excessive bacteria or yeast can lead to unpleasant infections and odors. After exiting the shower, a man should use a penis health cream (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil) full of essential vitamins and nutrients, including the bacteria-busting vitamin A to cut back on unpleasant odors, as well as natural emollients to support healthy, resilient and responsive penile skin.

 

Vasectomy - 5 Myths Debunked!

Vasectomy - 5 Myths Debunked!

Vasectomy is synonymous with sterilizations and is one of the most stress-free procedures for couples who want to limit their chances of pregnancy and child birth. It is a process that has been perfected over the years and is still the most reliable method to avoid impregnation. However, there are still some myths and allegories associated with it. Though these have considerably reduced in the modern age, there are still some pockets of the world where this is prevalent. Come, let us take a look at some misconceptions and myths regarding vasectomy and the actual truth behind them.

Myth 1: Your sexual performance gets affected.
This is one of the most common misconceptions that are associated with a vasectomy. This is the number one reason why many men are hesitant to go for it fearing that their sex life could get hindered leading to nonperformance.

Truth: This is incorrect. The idea behind a vasectomy is to avoid pregnancy, and there is no reason as to why it would hamper your sex life. You will be able to lead an active sex life, and semen production will also be normal.

Myth 2: Testosterone production will be nil after vasectomy
Sperms are made in the testicles, and hence this myth came into existence that once a vasectomy is performed, you would be unable to produce any sperms and testosterone.

Truth: The simple truth is the myth is entirely baseless. Your sperm production is never eliminated and only your tube for the distribution of sperms is closed by a vasectomy. Hence it in no way affects your sperm production. A vasectomy does not have any effect on the production of testosterone.

Myth 3: Vasectomies stops sperm production
Many people assume fertility with sperm production. Hence once a vasectomy procedure eliminates the fertility aspect your sperm production automatically stops.


Truth: No. This is incorrect. Vasectomies never stop sperm production. They only restrict the sperms from entering into the semen. Sperms have a lifespan of about four days. Hence it is only natural that they are removed and replaced.

Myth 4: You are completely sterile post the surgery
It is easy to assume that you are sterile after you have the surgery. There is no way that having sex can lead to a pregnancy.

Truth: While there is a lot of truth in the above, there can be some instances of live sperms below the procedure point. The complete process of sterility can take about 4 to 5 weeks to occur and for all the sperms to get relinquished. Hence it is safe to not have sex for these weeks. It is also safe to get a semen analysis post the surgery.

Myth 5: Vasectomies are fool proof sterility methods
The high success rates in the procedure have made everyone believe that vasectomy is the sure shot to infertility. It is also 100% efficient.

Truth: While it is true that a vasectomy has a high success rate it is certainly not 100%. There can be instances where there are failures in a vasectomy, and this will not curtail your sterility. There are even known cases when couples have been able to conceive even after a vasectomy. Though the chances are extremely high of becoming sterile, the procedure is not fool proof.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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I am 70 years old vasectomised 20 years back having lot of sex desire requires no pill for erection, but my wife 65 years have no interest in dec, although she gives me hand job off & on, l don't get satisfaction out of it.

I am 70 years old vasectomised 20 years back having lot of sex desire requires no pill for erection, but my wife 65 y...
Its not clear what do want out of your question other wise this is ok divert your attention to wards god/guru if you have faithin nature then start enjoying other thinghs except sex) around you do some creative work do yoga exercise.
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Surgical Sperm Retrieval

Surgical Sperm Retrieval

PESA / TESA / MESA

The main methods of surgical sperm retrieval available include:

  • PESA: percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration.
  • MESA: microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration.
  • TESA: testicular sperm aspiration. This includes testicular fine needle aspiration (TFNA).
  • TESE: testicular sperm extraction.
  • Microdissection TESE.
  • Perc biopsy: percutaneous biopsy of the testis.

Which method is used depends on the nature of the problem in the male partner, which needs to be explored carefully first.

Tests required before surgical sperm retrieval

A man that produces no sperm in his semen is said to have azoospermia. This may be because of a blockage in one of the tubes that carry sperm from the areas of the testes where they are produced, out to the penis during ejaculation. Obstructive azoospermia can be caused by testicular cancer, as the tumour presses on the vas deferens. This type of cancer is common in young men and can be treated successfully. It can, however, lead to infertility, so surgical sperm retrieval may be performed to store some sperm before treatment begins.

Other conditions cause non-obstructive azoospermia, including having an abnormal cystic fibrosis gene. Men with this condition may not show all the symptoms, but they often have no vas deferens. Surgical sperm retrieval is possible but there is a 50:50 chance that the embryos produced by subsequent ICSI and IVF will have the same genetic abnormality. Options then include using a sperm donor and intrauterine insemination (IUI) or IVF, or having pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) performed on the embryos to select ones that carry the normal gene.

If the problem that underlies poor sperm production is physical rather than genetic, or if a couple wants to have children after the male partner has had a vasectomy that cannot be reversed, surgical sperm retrieval can go ahead.

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