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Vaginal/Vulvar Atrophy Tips

All About Vulvar Cancer

Dr. Mohan Krishna Raut 90% (83 ratings)
MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS, DGO
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
All About Vulvar Cancer

Vulvar cancer is an invasive and cancerous growth, which occurs in the vulva (the external vaginal or reproductive tract opening in females). The main types of vulvar cancer include:

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma: This condition gives rise to abnormal growths that generally originate from the most common forms of skin cells known as squamous cells. They are characterized by open sores, scaly red patches, elevated growths with a depression in the centre or warts which might crust or bleed. They can cause disfiguring and sometimes can prove to be fatal if their growth is allowed.
  2. Melanoma: This is a form of cancer that is known to develop cells that contain pigment called melanocytes. It is one of the most dangerous forms of cancer and is more commonly found in women.
  3. Basal cell carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma contributes to around 1- 2% of vulvar cancer. This form of cancer tends to be slow-growing lesions on the labia majora (external large vulvar folds), but is capable of occurring anywhere else on the vulva. The behaviour bears resemblance to basal cell cancers that occur in other locations. Their growth is local and the risk of deep invasion or metastasis (spreading of cancer) is low. Treatment of basal cell carcinoma involves excision. However, these types of lesions tend to recur if they are not removed completely.

Symptoms of vulvar cancer include:

  1. Itching, bleeding or burning sensation on the vulva that is not relieved.
  2. Occurrence of skin changes such as rashes or warts, on the vulva.
  3. Pain in pelvis, particularly during sex or urination.
  4. Changes in skin colour of the vulva (abnormally red or white).
  5. Lumps, ulcers or sores that occur on the vulva which does not subside

Treatment options of vulvar cancer include:

1. Surgery: This is the most common form of treatment wherein, the cancer is removed without affecting the sexual function of the woman. Some of the surgical procedures include:

  • Laser Surgery
  • Wide local excision (small portion of the cancerous tissue)
  • Radical local excision (removing a major portion of benign tissues as well)
  • Ultrasonic surgical aspiration (tumour is broken into small pieces using fine vibrations)
  • Vulvectomy (removal of all or part of vulva)

2. Radiation Therapy: This treatment procedure involves using radiations such as X-rays to target and destroy the cancer cells. The two forms of radiation therapy are external radiation therapy and internal radiation therapy.

3. Chemotherapy: This form of treatment uses oral administration or injection of chemicals into the veins so that the growth of cancerous cells is stopped, either by elimination of the cells or by prohibiting cell division.

4946 people found this helpful

Ayurveda For Cerebellar Atrophy

Dr. Pardeep Sharma 90% (38 ratings)
MD - Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Jaipur
Ayurveda For Cerebellar Atrophy

Brain is like a network of many wires, these wires are cells called neurons. When these cells start shrinking, that is Cerebellar Atrophy. Shrinking of brain! Yes you read it right. Many different causes come together and shrink the brain tissue. Impact of this shrinkage reflects on the actions of brain. Actions controlled by affected area of the brain.

Cerebellar atrophy is of two types- generalized and localized. In generalized, type of atrophy all activities of brain diminish. In case of localized cerebral atrophy activities controlled by a specific area of the brain are affected. So, symptoms vary according to affected area with problem.

Causes of cerebellar atrophy includes- infection, drugs and other diseases like parkinson’s and alzheimer etc. Cerebral ataxia, dysphagia and inability to speak are few of the symptoms which appear in patients.

Ayurveda about Cerebellar Atrophy

This particular condition is not described in Ayurveda as it is. Exact noun is not available in terms of the name of disease in Ayurveda. For treatment, we need to understand the pathology. Pathology is a process which leads us to problem. Until unless we don't reverse pathology. Condition will remain same. Some medicines can help us to suppress signs and symptoms. This is not the treatment as per Ayurveda. Ayurveda believes in reversal of pathology. 

In case of Cerebral Atrophy, the main thing is the cause why brain cells start decaying. Ayurveda works on three Doshas. Vata is one of these three. Vata controls the nervous system. So nervous system is all about Vata Dosha. Aggravation of Vata dosha leads to the neural problems. The diet, lifestyle which can aggravate Vata dosha causes conditions like  Atrophy.

Because old age is a period for Vata Aggravation thus atrophy is common in old age. So everything is related to Vata. Sukhayu Ayurved has researched well in all such cases. Cerebellar Atrophy is common in people who follow Vata Aggravating foods and lifestyles.Thus approach for the treatment of Cerebellar Atrophy is according to Vata Vyadhi.

Vata is dry thus it dries up the tissues. Therefore we need to nourish the body with “fats” and unctuousness.  We can do that through Panchakarma treatments. We have seen more wonderful results in all such cases with Ayurvedic treatments.

Ayurveda Treatment for Cerebellar Atrophy

Generally, it is asked is there some medicines for Cerebellar Atrophy. There is a treatment for Cerebellar atrophy with Ayurveda. Sukhayu Ayurveda provides the treatment through Panchakarma interventions. Basti is a drug of treatment in all neural disorders. There are many types of Bastis. Especially relevant basti is selected according to the condition of patients. In addition to all these Yoga is another dimension what we add to the treatment for atrophy.

While working on diet-lifestyle our physicians prescribe medicines for 6 to 8 months and 21 days panchakarma. Selection of Panchakarma procedures vary from patient to patient. As a result of nourishing the body and countering dryness of Vata signs and symptoms of a patient starts reducing. Most important thing for treatment is- faith and follow-up. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Ayurveda.

6665 people found this helpful

Painful Intercourse Or Dyspareunia

Dr. Anoop Kumar Sonker 93% (97 ratings)
BHMS
Sexologist, Lucknow
Painful Intercourse Or Dyspareunia

Dyspareunia is pain prior to, during, or after, sexual intercourse. Dyspareunia is more common in women but can affect either sex. Dyspareunia can have several different causes. For instance, vaginismus is a ‘spasm’or contractions of the muscles surrounding the vagina.

  • Dyspareunia is pain prior to, during, or after, sexual intercourse. Dyspareunia is more common in women but can affect either sex. Many women will experience dyspareunia at some time in their life. Sometimes a medial or physical etiology may not be obvious and psychosocial factors also can play an important role. In men, dyspareunia can be related to an allergic reaction to a condom or spermicidal. An infection of the prostate or prostatitis may also cause pain. If a female partner has a vaginal infection or dryness, the male can experience discomfort during intercourse.
  • Dyspareunia can have several different causes. For instance, vaginismus is a “spasm” or contractions of the muscles surrounding the vagina. Women with vaginismus have pain with insertion of tampons as well as with penile penetration.
  • Vulvodynia and vulvar vestibullitis are both conditions that are characterized by painful intercourses. They are also characterized by vulvar burning and itching. The discomfort may not necessarily be associated with intercourse.
  • In older women vaginal dryness is a common cause of dyspareunia. This is a common problem for women that are not on hormone replacement. Dyspareunia can also be caused by abnormalities of the uterus or pelvic organs. Woman may describe the pain as feeling that something is being “pushed” or “bumped” during intercourse. An enlarged uterus or ovary can cause painful intercourse especially during deep penetration. A prolapsed or “dropped” uterus or bladder may also cause discomfort. Dyspareunia can also result from previous pelvic surgery or infection. These conditions can reduce movement of the pelvic organs resulting in pain with deep penetration.
  • Women who experience trauma such as rape or sexual assault may also experience dyspareunia. Unfortunately, many women may have difficulty sharing this information with their health care providers.
  • In order to treat dyspareunia appropriately the cause must be identified. The time at which the pain occurs during intercourse and other associated symptoms can help determine the potential etiology. For instance, pain during entry may have a different etiology than pain with deep penetration.

It is also important for a health care provider to know when in a woman’s life symptoms began. For example, if a woman’s symptoms began around or shortly after menopause; her symptoms could result from atrophic vaginal tissue. She may describe her symptoms as burning or “friction” with intercourse. Vaginal lubricants or estrogen can improve dryness and decrease pain. For women with a history of endometriosis, pelvic surgery, or infection, treatment of dyspareunia is aimed at restoring pelvic organs to their normal positions and reducing scar tissue. Surgical management may also be recommended for women with symptomatic prolapsed of the uterus, rectum, or bladder.

Women with a history of sexual abuse or treatment may benefit from psychological evaluation and treating any depressive symptoms that are present.

Types of dyspareunia:

It is useful to differentiate between the different types of dyspareunia to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and eventual prognosis.

1. Superficial dyspareunia. Vaginismus is a specific type of dyspareunia that refers to spasms of the levator ani and perineal muscles, making intercourse difficult, painful. Undesirable, and often impossible. May clinicians have defined vaginismus as an almost certain psychogenic illness. However, organic disorders of the external genitalia and introital areas can cause such severe discomfort that any attempts at penetration can leas to spasm. This particular cycle, primarily caused by situational and anticipatory anxiety, can become self perpetuating often both organic and functional and can be solely a result of recognized disease entities.
2. Deep dyspareunia refers to a deeper pelvic pain that is experienced at any time during intercourse. Again, this may be secondary to pelvic abnormality, or it may be functional in origin. It also tends to overlap more with chronic pelvic pain syndrome.
Etiology of dyspareunia:

The presence of organic disease is often the cause of dyspareunia. Virtually all gynecologic disease entities list dyspareunia as a possible symptom.

Prominent in the list of diseases associated with dyspareunia are the following:

  • Chronic pelvic infection.
  • Endometriosis
  • Pelvic carcinoma
  • Extensive prolapsed or organ displacement
  • Episiotomy.
  • Acute vulvovaginitis
  • Cystitis
  • Urethral syndrome or other urinary tract disorders.
  • Introital, vaginal, and cervical scarring.
  • All space occupying lesions.
  • Levator ani myalgia.
  • Vulvar vestibulitis.

1. As with chronic pelvic pain syndromes, gastrointestinal (gi) diseases (e. G, bowel motility disorders) must be excluded.

2. Estrogen deprivation, irritating vaginal medications, sympathomimetic drugs, amphetamines, and cocaine are also causes, primarily in superficial dyspareunia and vaginismus.

3. The most common causes of superficial dyspareunia include vaginitis (atrophic or infectious) or lack of lubrication (either caused by physiologic conditions or suboptimal sexual technique.

4. Lesions in the cul-de-sac are said to correlate most often with deep penetration dyspareunia.

5. Women who have deep penetration dyspareunia and who do not have superficial pain on penetration or vaginismus usually do not have a causative external inflammatory syndrome.

6. Some individual with external dyspareunia or vaginismus have small, almost imperceptible scar tissue secondary to surgery or childbirth.

7. Two clinical syndromes not usually recognized involve broad ligament varicosities and the broad ligament tear syndrome.
8. Frequently unrecognized etiology, particularly on first, interview, is a history or sexual assault or abuse.

Diagnostic workgroup

It is extremely important to look for evidence of sexual abuse both on history and physical examination before undertaking an expensive workup. Routine studies include a cbc, sedimentation rate, urinalysis, urine culture and sensitivity, and vaginal smear and culture. A pap smear should also be done. If pregnancy is suspected, a pregnancy test should be done. If there is a pelvic mass, pelvic ultrasound may be helpful. A referral to gynecologist is usually made before ordering this study, however. If vulval dystrophy is suspected, a vaginal biopsy may be useful. If the vaginal examination is normal, perhaps a psychiatrist should be consulted.

  • Normal pelvic examination
  • Abnormal pelvic examination
  • Difficult penetration
  • Difficult during intercourse
  • With abnormal rectal examination
  • Inflamed
  • Hymeneal
  • Orifice
  • Bartholinitis
  • Vulvitis
  • Vulval
  • Dystrophy
  • Cystitis
  • Urethritis
  • Difficult during intercourse
  • Salpingooophoritis
  • Retroverted
  • Uterus
  • Endometriosis
  • Ovarian cyst.
  • With abnormal rectal examination
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Anal fissure
  • Impacted
  • Feces
  • B-normal pelvic examination

With sexual desire 2. Without sexual desire
Functional dyspareunia not true dyspareunia

Differential diagnosis

Sexual pain disorder: persistent recurrent genital pain or nonorganic cause associated with sexual stimulation.

Vaginismus: painful, involuntary spasm of the vagina, preventing intercourse

Vulvar vestibulitis: a chronic and persistent clinical syndrome characterized by severe pain with vestibular touch or attempted vaginal entry, tenderness in response to pressure within the vulvar vestibule, and physical findings confined to various degrees of vestibular erythema.

Vulvodynia: chronic vulvar discomfort (e. G. Burning, stinging, irritation, rawness).

Female sexual dysfunction (disorders of desire, arousal, or orgasm)

Homeopathic remedies.

1. Bellis perennis
Bruised sensation in the vagina, if intercourse is interrupted.

2. Cactus grandiflora
Vagina squeezes shut when intercourse is attempted. Intercourse may be easier just before menses.

3. Coffea
Over sensitivity of the vulva and vagina. Heat and itchiness. Vaginismus with pain.

4. Cuprum
Cramping in the vagina and sometimes also in the legs, during intercourse.

5. Ferrum
Vagina feels dry, painful and raw. No feelings of arousal.

6. Gelsemium
Anxiety before intercourse. Tendency to vaginismus.

7. Lycopodium
Dry, burning vagina during and after intercourse. May have varicose veins in vulva.

8. Natrum mur
Dryness, with smarting and burning pains. Acrid discharge.

9. Platina
Strong sexual desire. May have erotic dreams. Difficult to have intercourse as vulva is extremely over-sensitive. Intercourse is painful and causes bruised sensation.

10. Rhus tox
Soreness during and after intercourse, often accompanied by physical restlessness.

11. Sepia
Dryness with bleeding after intercourse. (if you have this symptom seek medical advice.) feeling that everything will prolapse. Suits women who are exhausted and want to escape from their situation.

12. Staphisagria
Extremely useful remedy for pain after loss of virginity or in instances of rape or sexual assault.

13. Thuja
Vagina is over-sensitive making intercourse painful and difficult. Pains: burning, sore, bruised. May be helpful where there is a history of sti’s or if there are feelings of shame and self-disgust in relation to intercourse.

But before taking these medicine please consult your homoeopathic doctor.

4 people found this helpful

Female Sexual Health: Female Should Know

Dr. Chandra Bhusan Mishra 90% (2339 ratings)
BHMS, PGD PPHC, BMCP, Training In USG
Homeopath, Kolkata
Female Sexual Health: Female Should Know

You just never seem to be in the mood these days. Or the last few times you had sex, it hurt. Maybe you have some discharge that’s different from the norm.

But how do you know which signs might signal a bigger problem with your health?

“How can you know what abnormal is if you don’t know what normal is?”

Lang says it’s a good idea for a woman to examine her vagina with a mirror and light each month, just as you do a regular check of your breasts.

If something just doesn’t seem right or it’s bothering you, don’t feel embarrassed to bring it up with your doctor. “You deserve to have a healthy sex life,

Here are the few symptoms  you should bring up when they happen and consult doctor

Low Desire

By far the most common sexual health issue for women is low desire,

If low desire doesn’t bother you, it’s not a problem, But if it’s causing you distress (and it’s lasted for at least 6 months), you can talk to your doctor to find out what may be going on.

Hypoactive sexual desire disorder, the medical term for a low sex drive, can have many different causes -- physical, emotional, cultural, or a combination of those. It could come from a hormone problem, such as estrogen or your thyroid hormone. It could happen because of other health conditions you have, like diabetes, anxiety, depression, or sleep disorders. It may be a side effect of a medication you take, like antidepressants or birth control pills. Even smoking and alcohol can affect desire. Or it may have to do with the quality of your relationship with a sexual partner.

Your doctor or another health professional in the office may ask you some questions to figure out what’s going on.

Pain and Discomfort

You’re not alone if sex hurts. Nearly three out of four women will have pain during intercourse at some point. It could be in the vagina and the area just outside of it, called the vulva. But some women feel pain inside their pelvis, too.

Sometimes sex is uncomfortable when you’re not aroused enough, or you have a vaginal infection or a skin condition, like allergies or psoriasis. But pain during sex can also be a sign of serious conditions like pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, fibroids, ovarian cysts, or cancer. So if it happens often or is severe, see your doctor -- she’ll want to rule out any serious health issues that could be causing it.

If you’ve reached menopause, painful sex may be caused by vaginal atrophy. That’s when the tissues around your vagina and vulva dry up because of the loss of estrogen.

If you feel a bulging sensation around your vagina and have trouble peeing, it could be a sign that your bladder or other organs in your pelvis have dropped from their normal place and are pushing against your vagina. That’s called a pelvic organ prolapse, a problem that becomes more common with age. Treatments include Kegel exercises, physical therapy, Homeopathic medicine and surgery.

Irregular BleedingIf you’re past menopause and you have bleeding from your vagina, see your doctor as soon as possible. She’ll need to make sure you don’t have a serious problem, like an infe

ction, uterine fibroids, or cancer.

If you’re still having periods, watch for any spotting, bleeding between periods, bleeding after sex, or periods that are heavier or last longer tha

n usual.

Consult doctor if you have these symptoms.

Unusual Discharge

Is there a change in the color, amount, or smell of your discharge that lasts more than a few days? Let your doctor know.

You may have something that’s simple to treat, like a bacterial or yeast infection. But some discharges may be a sign of sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea or chlamydia. Watery or bloody discharges may be due to cancer

Lumps and Bumps, Rashes and Sores

If you notice any changes in your skin below your beltline, like a mole that looks different or is new, or a bump that itches or hurts, tell your doctor.

These spots can have many different causes, from an ingrown hair to an STD like genital warts or herpes. More serious is vulvar cancer, a rare condition that can show up as a lump, bump, or sore. It may cause itching or tenderness.

No matter what symptoms you’ve noticed, when something doesn’t feel or look right to you, don’t worry that you’re making a big deal out of nothing. “Run it by your doctor just to get a reassuring word,” Lang says. “So you don’t have to worry.”

Risk Factors Of Breast Cancer!

Dr. Ramakanth Reddy 92% (153 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Risk Factors Of Breast Cancer!

What is a risk factor?

A risk factor is anything that may increase a person's chance of developing a disease. It may be an activity, such as smoking, diet, family history, or many other things. Different diseases, including cancers, have different risk factors.

Knowing your risk factors for any disease can help guide you into the appropriate actions, including changing behaviors and being clinically monitored for the disease.

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?

Any woman may develop breast cancer. However, the following risk factors may increase the likelihood of developing the disease.

Risk factors that cannot be changed:

  • Gender. Breast cancer occurs nearly 100 times more often in women than in men.

  • Race or ethnicity. It has been noted that white women develop breast cancer slightly more often than African-American women. However, African-American women tend to die of breast cancer more often. This may be partly due to the fact that African-American women often develop a more aggressive type of tumor, although why this happens is not known. The risk for developing breast cancer and dying from it is lower in Hispanic, Native American, and Asian women.

  • Aging. Two out of 3 women with invasive cancer are diagnosed after age 55.

  • Personal history of breast cancer

  • Previous breast irradiation

  • Family history and genetic factors. Having a close relative, such as a mother or sister, with breast cancer increases the risk. This includes changes in certain genes, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, and others.

  • Benign breast diseaseWomen with certain benign breast conditions (such as hyperplasia or atypical hyperplasia) have an increased risk of breast cancer. 

  • Dense breast tissue. Breast tissue may look dense or fatty on a mammogram. Older women with high dense breast tissue are at increased risk.

  • Diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure. Women who took this drug while pregnant (to lower the chance of miscarriage) are at higher risk. The possible effect on their daughters is under study.

  • Early menstrual periods. Women whose periods began early in life (before age 12) have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer.

  • Late menopauseWomen are at a slightly higher risk if they began menopause later in life (after age 55).

The most frequently cited lifestyle-related risk factors:

  • Not having children, or having your first child after age 30

  • Recent use (within 10 years) of oral contraceptives

  • Physical inactivity

  • Alcohol use (more than 1 drink per day)

  • Long-term, postmenopausal use of combined estrogen and progestin (HRT)*

  • Weight gain and obesity, especially after menopause

Environmental risk factors:

  • Exposure to pesticides, or other chemicals, is currently being examined as a possible risk factor.

**Hormone replacement therapy update

Hormone (estrogen-alone or estrogen-plus-progestin) products are approved therapies for relief from moderate to severe hot flashes related to menopause and symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy. Although hormone therapy is effective for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis, it should only be considered for women at significant risk of osteoporosis who cannot take nonestrogen medications. The FDA recommends that hormone therapy be used at the lowest doses for the shortest duration needed to achieve treatment goals.

Postmenopausal women who use or are considering using hormone therapy should discuss the possible benefits and risks with their doctor.

Gynecological Cancer - Signs & Symptoms To Watch Out For!

Dr. Rishma Dhillon Pai 85% (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, DGO, MD - Gynae, FCPS - Gynae, DNB - Obs & Gynae
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Gynecological Cancer - Signs & Symptoms To Watch Out For!

Being diagnosed with cancer is something no one looks forward to and Gynaecological Cancer is every woman’s worst nightmare. However, if diagnosed in time, it can be treated. Cancer in any part of a woman’s reproductive system is termed as gynecological cancer. It is of five types:

  1. Cervical cancer

  2. Ovarian cancer

  3. Vaginal cancer

  4. Vulvar cancer and

  5. Uterine cancer

Paying attention to your body and understanding its natural rhythm can help you recognize signs of gynecological cancer. This is because signs of gynecological cancer can be difficult to identify unless you know your body. Here are a five signs to watch out for-

  1. Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding: Bleeding in between periods is okay once in a while but if it happens continuously over a period of 2 to 3 months, do not ignore it. Vaginal bleeding after menopause should also never be ignored. Abnormal bleeding could be triggered by a number of conditions including cancer of the lining of the uterus. Sudden changes in your menstrual blood that persist for over 2 cycles such as heavy bleeding can also be a symptom of uterine cancer. Heavy bleeding can be defined as a period that lasts for over 7 days.

  2. Changes in the Vulva: Any change in colour of development of bumps, sores of thickened skin should be immediately shown to a gynecologist. Any form of vulvar itching or burning should also not be ignored. These conditions could be symptoms of vulvar cancer. Hence, it is important to know what your vulva looks like normally.

  3. Bloating: Persistent bloating that lasts for over a fortnight can be a sign of ovarian cancer. This is especially true in cases of bloating accompanied by sudden weight loss or between-period bleeding.

  4. Change in Bathroom Habits: Due to the proximity of the bladder to the reproductive organs, a tumour or swelling in the reproductive organs can trigger symptoms similar to those of a urinary tract infection. This includes pain while urinating, difficulty passing urine, diarrhea or constipation. Urinary incontinence could also a sign of gynecological cancer.

  5. Abdominal or Back Pain: In rare cases, lower back pain could be a sign of ovarian cancer or uterine cancer. Pain in the lower abdomen or pelvic area can also be a sign of ovarian cancer.

The above could also be signs of other health disorders. The only way of knowing for sure is by consulting a doctor. Hence, understand your body and if you notice any of these symptoms consult your gynecologist at the earliest. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

5 people found this helpful

Signs of Gynecological Cancer

Dr. Prabha Singla 91% (130 ratings)
MBBS, DGO
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
Signs of Gynecological Cancer

Being diagnosed with cancer is something no one looks forward to and Gynaecological Cancer is every woman’s worst nightmare. However, if diagnosed in time, it can be treated. Cancer in any part of a woman’s reproductive system is termed as gynecological cancer. It is of five types:

  1. Cervical cancer

  2. Ovarian cancer

  3. Vaginal cancer

  4. Vulvar cancer and

  5. Uterine cancer

Paying attention to your body and understanding its natural rhythm can help you recognize signs of gynecological cancer. This is because signs of gynecological cancer can be difficult to identify unless you know your body. Here are a five signs to watch out for-

  1. Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding: Bleeding in between periods is okay once in a while but if it happens continuously over a period of 2 to 3 months, do not ignore it. Vaginal bleeding after menopause should also never be ignored. Abnormal bleeding could be triggered by a number of conditions including cancer of the lining of the uterus. Sudden changes in your menstrual blood that persist for over 2 cycles such as heavy bleeding can also be a symptom of uterine cancer. Heavy bleeding can be defined as a period that lasts for over 7 days.

  2. Changes in the Vulva: Any change in colour of development of bumps, sores of thickened skin should be immediately shown to a gynecologist. Any form of vulvar itching or burning should also not be ignored. These conditions could be symptoms of vulvar cancer. Hence, it is important to know what your vulva looks like normally.

  3. Bloating: Persistent bloating that lasts for over a fortnight can be a sign of ovarian cancer. This is especially true in cases of bloating accompanied by sudden weight loss or between-period bleeding.

  4. Change in Bathroom Habits: Due to the proximity of the bladder to the reproductive organs, a tumour or swelling in the reproductive organs can trigger symptoms similar to those of a urinary tract infection. This includes pain while urinating, difficulty passing urine, diarrhea or constipation. Urinary incontinence could also a sign of gynecological cancer.

  5. Abdominal or Back Pain: In rare cases, lower back pain could be a sign of ovarian cancer or uterine cancer. Pain in the lower abdomen or pelvic area can also be a sign of ovarian cancer.

The above could also be signs of other health disorders. The only way of knowing for sure is by consulting a doctor. Hence, understand your body and if you notice any of these symptoms consult your gynecologist at the earliest.  

2385 people found this helpful

How To Avoid Back Pain Specially In White Collar Jobs?

Dr. Hemant Gaur 89% (46 ratings)
MPT, Mphill
Physiotherapist, Delhi
How To Avoid Back Pain Specially In White Collar Jobs?

Generally it has been seen that those people who remain in sitting for long time due to nature of their job they should us farmulae - 40/40 means after every 40 minutes they should walk 40 steps as prolong sitting can stop their blood to lower limb as well as there might be atrophy of lower limb muscles.

1 person found this helpful

Dr. Rahman 91% (820 ratings)
Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S)
Sexologist, Chennai
Vaginal Itching

Vaginal itching is an uncomfortable and sometimes painful symptom that is often caused by irritating substances, treatable and preventable infections, or menopause. In rare cases, itching may occur due to stress or can be a sign of vulvar cancer. Your gynecologist can determine the cause of your itching through an examination and testing. He or she will then be able to recommend appropriate treatments for this uncomfortable symptom.

Through good hygiene and a healthy diet, you can avoid most causes of vaginal itching.

Home Care for Vaginal Itching

To prevent vaginal irritation and infection, there are several steps you can take at home.

Avoid using feminine hygiene products, as these can cause irritation.

Avoid scented soaps, lotions, and bubble baths.

When exercising or swimming, change out of wet or damp clothing immediately afterward.

Wear cotton underwear, which is breathable and will keep you dry.

Eat yogurt with live cultures to reduce the chance of getting yeast infections.

If you are diabetic, take steps to control your blood sugar.

Know About Dyspareunia!

Dr. Ramakrishna Chanduri 88% (24 ratings)
BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
Know About Dyspareunia!

Pain during or after sexual intercourse is known as dyspareunia. Although this problem can affect men, it is more common in women. Women with dyspareunia may have pain in the vagina, clitoris or labia. There are numerous causes of dyspareunia, many of which are treatable. 

Common causes include the following:

-Vaginal dryness

-Atrophic vaginitis, a common condition causing thinning of the vaginal lining in postmenopausal women

-Side effects of drugs such as antihistamines and tamoxifen (Nolvadex and other brands)

-An allergic reaction to clothing, spermicides or douches

-Endometriosis, an often painful condition in which tissue from the uterine lining migrates and grows abnormally inside the pelvis

-Inflammation of the area surrounding the vaginal opening, called vulvar vestibulitis

-Skin diseases, such as lichen planus and lichen sclerosus, affecting the vaginal area

-Urinary tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, or sexually transmitted diseases

-Psychological trauma, often stemming from a past history of sexual abuse or trauma.

3 people found this helpful
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