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Sensitive Bladder Tips

What Is Cystitis?

Dr. Ramakrishna Chanduri 88% (2684 ratings)
BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad

What Is Cystitis?

  • Cystitis usually occurs when the urethra and bladder, which are normally sterile, or microbe-free, become infected with bacteria.
  • Bacteria fasten to the lining of the bladder and cause the area to become irritated and inflamed.
  • Cystitis affects people of both sexes and all ages. It is more common among females than males because women have shorter urethras.

Cystitis signs and symptoms :

  • A strong, persistent urge to urinate
  • A burning sensation when urinating
  • Passing frequent, small amounts of urine
  • Blood in the urine (hematuria)
  • Passing cloudy or strong-smelling urine
  • Pelvic discomfort
  • A feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen
  • Low-grade fever
  • In young children, new episodes of accidental daytime wetting also may be a sign of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Nighttime bed-wetting on its own isn't likely to be associated with a UTI.

Causes :

There are many possible causes of cystitis. Most are infectious, and the majority of these cases stem from an ascending infection. The bacteria enter from the external genitourinary structures​

Diagnosis :

  • A doctor will ask the patient some questions, carry out an examination, and do a urine test. The urine test will either be sent to a laboratory, or the doctor may use a dipstick. Urine dipstick results come back quickly while the patient is still in the office.
  • Urine culture or catheterized urine specimen may be performed to determine the type of bacteria in the urine. After finding out which specific bacterium is causing the infection, the doctor will prescribe an oral antibiotic.
  • Most doctors will also offer to test for a sexually transmitted infection (STI). STIs often have similar symptoms to cystitis.
  • Patients who get cystitis regularly may need further tests.
  • This could include an ultrasound scan, an X-ray, or a cystoscopy of the bladder, using a fiber-optic camera.

Prevention:

  • Drink plenty of liquids, especially water. Drinking lots of fluids are especially important if you're getting chemotherapy or radiation therapy, particularly on treatment days.
  • Urinate frequently. If you feel the urge to urinate, don't delay using the toilet.
  • Wipe from front to back after a bowel movement. This prevents bacteria in the anal region from spreading to the vagina and urethra.
  • Take showers rather than tub baths. If you're susceptible to infections, showering rather than bathing may help prevent them.
  • Gently wash the skin around the vagina and anus. Do this daily, but don't use harsh soaps or wash too vigorously. The delicate skin around these areas can become irritated.
  • Empty your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse. Drink a full glass of water to help flush bacteria.
  • Avoid using deodorant sprays or feminine products in the genital area. These products can irritate the urethra and bladder

What Is Cystitis?

Dr. Sathish Erra 92% (19124 ratings)
BHMS, Diploma in Dermatology
Sexologist, Hyderabad

What Is Cystitis?

  • Cystitis usually occurs when the urethra and bladder, which are normally sterile, or microbe-free, become infected with bacteria.
  • Bacteria fasten to the lining of the bladder and cause the area to become irritated and inflamed.
  • Cystitis affects people of both sexes and all ages. It is more common among females than males because women have shorter urethras.


Cystitis signs and symptoms :

  • A strong, persistent urge to urinate
  • A burning sensation when urinating
  • Passing frequent, small amounts of urine
  • Blood in the urine (hematuria)
  • Passing cloudy or strong-smelling urine
  • Pelvic discomfort
  • A feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen
  • Low-grade fever

In young children, new episodes of accidental daytime wetting also may be a sign of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Nighttime bed-wetting on its own isn't likely to be associated with a UTI.

Causes :

There are many possible causes of cystitis. Most are infectious, and the majority of these cases stem from an ascending infection. The bacteria enter from the external genitourinary structures


Diagnosis :

  • A doctor will ask the patient some questions, carry out an examination, and do a urine test. The urine test will either be sent to a laboratory, or the doctor may use a dipstick. Urine dipstick results come back quickly while the patient is still in the office.
  • Urine culture or catheterized urine specimen may be performed to determine the type of bacteria in the urine. After finding out which specific bacterium is causing the infection, the doctor will prescribe an oral antibiotic.
  • Most doctors will also offer to test for a sexually transmitted infection (STI). STIs often have similar symptoms to cystitis.
  • Patients who get cystitis regularly may need further tests.
  • This could include an ultrasound scan, an X-ray, or a cystoscopy of the bladder, using a fiber-optic camera.

Prevention:

  • Drink plenty of liquids, especially water. Drinking lots of fluids are especially important if you're getting chemotherapy or radiation therapy, particularly on treatment days.
  • Urinate frequently. If you feel the urge to urinate, don't delay using the toilet.
  • Wipe from front to back after a bowel movement. This prevents bacteria in the anal region from spreading to the vagina and urethra.
  • Take showers rather than tub baths. If you're susceptible to infections, showering rather than bathing may help prevent them.
  • Gently wash the skin around the vagina and anus. Do this daily, but don't use harsh soaps or wash too vigorously. The delicate skin around these areas can become irritated.
  • Empty your bladder as soon as possible after intercourse. Drink a full glass of water to help flush bacteria.
  • Avoid using deodorant sprays or feminine products in the genital area. These products can irritate the urethra and bladder

Frequent Urination - Can It Be A Sign Of Kidney Disease?

Dr. Garima Sharma 93% (456 ratings)
MBBS
General Physician, Fatehabad
Frequent Urination - Can It Be A Sign Of Kidney Disease?

Do you find it impossible to control the urge to urinate every now and then? If you feel the need to urinate more than 8 times a day, then it could be a health problem. Frequent urination is the medical term for this problem. The condition is not the same as urinary incontinence, where there is leakage of urine.

A number of habits can play a role in causing frequent urination. This includes drinking more fluids and consumption of caffeine-based beverages. However, the condition may also be a sign of an underlying kidney disorder.

Relation between frequent urination and kidney problems-

While frequent urination is itself not a serious problem, but it can be a symptom of kidney or ureter problems, urinary bladder problems, or diseases such as diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, or prostate gland problems.

Frequent urination is linked to a number of kidney problems such as:

a. Kidney infection (pyelonephritis)

Kidney infection (pyelonephritis) is a type of urinary tract infection (UTI) that normally starts in your urethra or bladder and travels to one or both of your kidneys. Frequent urination is often the most common symptom of pyelonephritis.

b. Kidney stones

Sometimes, hard collections of salt and minerals get accumulated in the form of stones in your kidney(s). These may increase in size in a ureter or the bladder. When the stone passes down the ureter, you may have an urge to urinate frequently.

c. Renal hypertension

If you suffer from renal hypertension (high blood pressure) or fluid buildup in the kidney, then your doctor may prescribe you medications that are used to treat and flush out excess fluid from the body. These medications can have a diuretic effect and may lead to frequent urination.

Feeling the urge to pass urine can be a symptom of many different problems. But if you experience the condition along with other abnormal symptoms such as fever or pain in abdomen, then you should consult your doctor immediately.  

1 person found this helpful

Lost Control Of The Urinary Bladder - What Are The Reasons?

Dr. Ram Naresh Daga 95% (20 ratings)
DNB - Urology, MS - General Surgery
Urologist, Jaipur
Lost Control Of The Urinary Bladder - What Are The Reasons?

Urinary incontinence is the inability to hold urine in the bladder because of loss of control of the bladder. The severity may range from temporary to chronic, depending on the cause of this disease. Urinary incontinence is more common in women than men and can be categorized into three types.

Types and symptoms of urinary incontinence

Stress incontinence: this incontinence may occur while participating in any physical activity such as a sudden cough, laugh, sneezing or exercising. The stress here refers to the sudden physical pressure that a person experiences, leading him/her to urinate involuntarily.

Urge incontinence: a sudden, involuntary contraction of the muscular wall of the bladder causes an urgency to urinate. This urgency can be formed by a sudden change in position or sex.

Overflow incontinence: this is more common in men with prostate gland problems, damaged bladder or blocked urethra. The person has an urge to urinate frequently but in small amounts.

Causes of urinary incontinence

There are a number of causes of urinary incontinence ranging from aging to cancer and physical damage to the neurological disorder.

1. Aging: with age, the bladder muscle weakens and the chances of incontinence increases.


Damage: since the pelvic muscles support the bladder any damage to it (surgeryor any procedure to remove the uterus) can lead to urinary incontinence.

2. Enlarged prostate: enlargement of the prostate gland in older men may give rise to this condition.

Cancer: urinary incontinence may be associated with untreated prostate cancer, which is a side effect of treatments for it.

3. Menopause: estrogen is a hormone that keeps the lining of bladder and urethra healthy. After menopause the production of estrogen is decreased, increasing the chances of urinary incontinence.

4. Prevention: urinary incontinence is not preventable but some steps can be taken to reduce the risk of it. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, avoiding smoking, practicing pelvic floor exercises, avoiding caffeine and acidic foods and eating more fiber to prevent constipation can help decreasing the risk of it.

Overactive Bladder - Must Know Things About It!

Dr. Gautam 89% (30 ratings)
MS - General Surgery, Mch - Urology
Urologist, Darbhanga
Overactive Bladder - Must Know Things About It!

A problem pertaining to the storage function of the bladder that results in bouts of sudden, often uncontrollable urge to urinate is referred to as an overactive bladder. This condition which is marked by unconditioned or involuntary loss of urine can sometimes be quite difficult to stop. People who experience such a condition often feel humiliated and as such tend to limit their social and work life. Despite such, only a few are conscious that a brief evaluation can help them manage and overcome an overactive bladder.

Mechanism of Urination

During urination, the urine proceeds from the bladder and flows into the urethra which is located at the tip of the penis in men and above the vagina in women. As the bladder fills, the nerve signals in the brain prompts urination by coordinating the relaxation and contraction of the urinary sphincter muscles.

Causes and Symptoms of an Overactive Bladder

Primarily caused due to involuntary contraction and relaxation of sphincter muscles, several conditions can lead to overactive bladder. 

Some of them are: 
1. Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and other neurological disorders
2. Poor kidney function due to diabetes
3. Medications that lead to increased production of urine
4. Bladder abnormalities like tumors or stones

5. Constipation
6. Excessive consumption of caffeine or alcohol

Some of the common signs of an overactive bladder are:
1. Bouts of sudden, uncontrollable urge to urinate
2. Awakening at night frequently to urinate
3. Urinating more than eight times a day

Risks
The risk of an overactive bladder gradually increases with age. Conditions, such as diabetes and an enlarged prostate results in the increased likelihood of an overactive bladder. People who have previously faced strokes and heart attacks experience cognitive decline, which often times lead to the development of an overactive bladder.

Urinary incontinence as well as a host of associated factors can be detrimental to your life. Emotional distress, interrupted sleep cycles and depression are some of the observed complications of this condition.

Thus if you experience or entertain suspicion of an overactive bladder, you should consider visiting a general physician who might refer you to a specialist, if need be.

Menopause - Can It Cause Prolapsed Bladder?

Dr. Amit Tuli 93% (1604 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - General Surgery, Genito Urinary Surgery
Urologist, Ludhiana
Menopause - Can It Cause Prolapsed Bladder?

Bladder prolapse is a condition wherein a woman’s vaginal wall ceases to adequately support the urinary bladder. The front wall of the vagina gives support to the bladder under normal circumstances but when this wall weakens, it allows the bladder to droop and become prolapsed. This can lead to a wide range of medical problems such as urinary difficulties, stress incontinence (leakage of urine while coughing or sneezing), pain and discomfort, etc.

Prolapsed bladders are generally associated with menopause. Also known as cystoceles or fallen bladders, they are categorized into four different types depending on the extent to which the bladder has prolapsed.
Grade 1: This is the mild stage wherein a small portion of the bladder droops into the vagina.
Grade 2: This is the moderate stage in which the bladder droops far enough to reach the opening of the vagina.
Grade 3: This is when the condition becomes severe and the bladder protrudes from the body through the opening of the vagina.
Grade 4: This occurs when the bladder has completely prolapsed. The entire bladder protrudes outside the vagina and is normally associated with other forms of pelvic organ prolapse such as uterine prolapse (the sagging of the uterus from its normal spot) and rectocele (prolapse of the wall between the vagina and the rectum).

What are the causes of prolapsed bladders?
Following are the factors that lead to the condition of prolapsed bladders:

  1. Menopause: The vaginal walls are known to become weak upon the onset of menopause. This occurs because the body inhibits the production of oestrogen, the hormone that renders strength to the muscles of the vagina. As a result, the bladder is no longer supported by the vagina.
  2. Childbirth: The process of childbirth puts a tremendous amount of stress on the vagina and often leads to deterioration of the muscles of the vaginal wall. This in turn leads to the condition of prolapsed bladder.
  3. Straining: Anything that puts strain on the walls of the vagina can lead to this condition. This includes lifting heavy objects, chronic constipation, obesity, excessive coughing and sneezing or any other factor that damages the pelvic floor.

What are the symptoms of a prolapsed bladder?
Symptoms of a prolapsed bladder vary from case to case, depending on the category and extent of the condition. Some of the most commonly experienced symptoms of the condition are as follows:
Tissue sticking out of the vagina (that may be tender and/or bleeding)

  1. Frequent urge to urinate
  2. Urinary incontinence (unwanted leakage of urine)
  3. Pain during urination
  4. Pain during sex
  5. Frequent urinary tract and bladder infections
  6. Pain in the vagina, pelvis, lower abdomen or lower back
  7. Incomplete urination
1 person found this helpful

Frequent Urination - Are You Suffering From An Overactive Bladder?

Dr. Ram Naresh Daga 95% (20 ratings)
DNB - Urology, MS - General Surgery
Urologist, Jaipur
Frequent Urination - Are You Suffering From An Overactive Bladder?

An overactive bladder is a condition that is characterized by a problem in the bladder storage function; a problem that eggs one on to urinate frequently. This condition can cause problems in your social and work life. You may isolate yourself from others and feel embarrassed about the situation.

Symptoms
If you have an overactive bladder, you may exhibit symptoms of frequent urination, involuntary leakage of urine and frequent urge to urinate. These symptoms might disrupt your daily life; so it is important to seek advice from a medical practitioner.

Causes
To better understand what causes an overactive bladder, you need to know how the urination process works. Urine is produced by the kidneys, which flows to the bladder. During urination, the urine is excreted from an opening in the bladder and flows out via the urethra. As the kidneys secrete urine, the bladder starts to fill up. During this stage, nerve signals are sent to the brain; signals that trigger your body to urinate. The bladder muscles tighten that pushes the urine out of the body.

An overactive bladder results from the involuntarily contraction of the bladder, which might happen even if the content of urine in the bladder is low. These contractions create the urge to urinate. The various causes of an overactive bladder are:

  1. Excessive fluid intake, if your fluid intake is high, then you may have the tendency to urinate frequently.
  2. Presence of tumors or stones in the bladder can make the bladder overactive as well.
  3. Excessive alcohol or caffeine consumption has the same effect as an excessive intake of fluids has.
  4. Urinary tract infections may interfere with the entire process of urination, thus causing your bladder to swell up and become overactive.
  5. Other diseases and conditions such as constipation and an enlarged prostatecan hamper bladder functioning.

Treatment
There are multiple approaches to treat an overactive bladder; your doctor may use one or a combination of multiple methods.

  1. Medications: Medications such as Trospium and Tolterodine help in relaxing the bladder. These medications help treat symptoms of frequent urination.
  2. Bladder injections: Botox is a protein that is injected into the bladder that causes partial paralysis of the bladder muscles. This helps in treating the constant urge to urinate. However, its effects are temporary as they last for 6-9 months.
  3. Lifestyle modifications: Certain lifestyle modifications such as incorporating exercises to strengthen the pelvic muscles, maintaining optimal weight levels and bladder training to control its functioning can help with managing an overactive bladder.
  4. SurgeryIf the other treatments do not produce the desired results, then surgery is usually recommended. The aim of the surgery is to enhance the storage capacity of the bladder and reduce bladder pressure. 
3056 people found this helpful

Frequent Urination - Is It A Sign Of Enlarged Prostate?

Dr. Gautam 89% (30 ratings)
MS - General Surgery, Mch - Urology
Urologist, Darbhanga
Frequent Urination - Is It A Sign Of Enlarged Prostate?

The condition of enlarged prostate occurs due to the enlargement of a man’s prostate gland, with the passage in time. Also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), it is more common in men over the age of 60. Some cases might have symptoms and others may be symptomless. Although the causes are relatively unknown, it is evident that BPH is not a form of cancer, neither does it cause cancer. The prostate is located below the bladder and is responsible for producing the fluid needed by semen. The growth of the prostate tissue that is associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia begins near the inner prostate which is a tissue ring around the urethra. Its growth is generally inward.

Causes
It is of common knowledge that in males, the urine originates from the bladder and flows through the urethra. BPH is a condition where the prostate experiences a benign i.e. non cancerous enlargement which leads to blockage of urine flow through the urethra (the urinary duct). The resultant enlargement, caused due to the gradual multiplication of cells, subjects the urethra to extra pressure. Further narrowing of the urethra causes more contraction of the bladder, resulting in the urine being forcefully pushed out of the body.

With time, the condition leads to the bladder muscles gradually becoming thicker, stronger and oversensitive. Contraction occurs even due to the presence of small amounts of urine, giving rise to frequent needs of urination. At one point, the bladder muscle is unable to overcome the effects of the narrowed urethra. Due to this, urine does not pass properly and the urethra is not emptied.

Some of the common symptoms of enlarged prostate include:
1. Frequent urination
2. Urgency to urinate
3. Difficulty during urination
4. A slow or weak urinary stream
5. Requirement of extra effort to urinate
6. Interrupted sleep due to need of urination

Further risks
Sometimes, when the bladder is not emptied completely, a risk of urinary tract infections develops. Some other serious problems which can be a result of enlarged prostate include blood in urinebladder stones as well as acute urinary retention (inability to urinate). In some rare cases, kidney and/or bladder damage might also result from such a condition.

2663 people found this helpful

How An Overactive Bladder Can Cause Frequent Urination?

Dr. Neeraj Gupta 90% (153 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB - Urology/Genito - Urinary Surgery
Urologist, Bhopal
How An Overactive Bladder Can Cause Frequent Urination?

An overactive bladder is a condition that is characterized by a problem in the bladder storage function; a problem that makes not that eggs one on to urinate frequently. 

Symptoms
If you have an overactive bladder, you may exhibit symptoms of frequent urination, involuntary leakage of urine and frequent urge to urinate. These symptoms might disrupt your daily life; so it is important to seek advice from a medical practitioner.

Causes
To better understand what causes an overactive bladder, you need to know how the urination process works. Urine is produced by the kidneys, which flows to the bladder. During urination, the urine is excreted from an opening in the bladder and flows out via the urethra. As the kidneys secrete urine, the bladder starts to fill up. During this stage, nerve signals are sent to the brain; signals that trigger your body to urinate. The bladder muscles tighten that pushes the urine out of the body.

An overactive bladder results from the involuntarily contraction of the bladder, which might happen even if the content of urine in the bladder is low. These contractions create the urge to urinate. The various causes of an overactive bladder are:

  1. Excessive fluid intake, if your fluid intake is high, then you may have the tendency to urinate frequently.
  2. Presence of tumors or stones in the bladder can make the bladder overactive as well.
  3. Excessive alcohol or caffeine consumption has the same effect as an excessive intake of fluids has.
  4. Urinary tract infections may interfere with the entire process of urination, thus causing your bladder to swell up and become overactive.
  5. Other diseases and conditions such as constipation and an enlarged prostate can hamper bladder functioning.

Treatment
There are multiple approaches to treat an overactive bladder; your doctor may use one or a combination of multiple methods.

  1. Medications: Medications such as Trospium and Tolterodine help in relaxing the bladder. These medications help treat symptoms of frequent urination.
  2. Bladder injections: Botox is a protein that is injected into the bladder that causes partial paralysis of the bladder muscles. This helps in treating the constant urge to urinate. However, its effects are temporary as they last for 6-9 months.
  3. Lifestyle modifications: Certain lifestyle modifications such as incorporating exercises to strengthen the pelvic muscles, maintaining optimal weight levels and bladder training to control its functioning can help with managing an overactive bladder.
  4. SurgeryIf the other treatments do not produce the desired results, then surgery is usually recommended. The aim of the surgery is to enhance the storage capacity of the bladder and reduce bladder pressure.
4424 people found this helpful

Bladder Tumour And Its Common Causes

Dr. Rakesh Sharma 87% (10 ratings)
MCh - Urology & Kidney Transplant, MS - General Surgery, MBBS
Urologist, Jaipur
Bladder Tumour And Its Common Causes

The bladder is a hollow storage organ that collects urine from the kidneys and stores it until it can be passed out of the body through the urethra during the process of micturition or urination. It has a thin inner lining of cells called urothelial cells and a thick muscular wall, which exerts pressure to push the urine out of the body.

Causes of Bladder Tumors

In most cases, the bladder tumour develops on the inner layer due to a combination of some of the following factors.

1. Hereditar - A strong family history of cancer predisposes a person to cancer.
2. Gender - Men are 3 times more prone for bladder cancer than women.
3. Ethnicity - White people are more prone for bladder cancer black people.
4. Smoking - Smokers develop bladder cancer 2-6 times more frequently than non-smokers. Cigarettes contain toxic, carcinogenic substances which reach the kidney and are stored in the bladder, leading to their damage.
5. Occupational hazards - Some workplaces have a higher likelihood of causing bladder cancers, especially dye and rubber industries. The effects can be damaging, and the person may develop cancers years after the exposure has happened.
6. Recurrent bladder infections - In some people, this can also lead to bladder cancer in the long run.

Types of Bladder Tumor

Depending on the extent of the cancerous spread, it can be of two types:

1. Non-muscle-invasive bladder tumours: The tumor spread is limited to the inner part of the bladder (urothelial cells)
2. Muscle-invasive bladder tumour: The tumour has spread to the thick muscular outer layer. This is more advanced and prognosis is poor compared to the noninvasive type.

The most common and diagnostic symptom of bladder cancer is the presence of blood in the urine, known as hematuria. This will be intermittent and happens whenever the tumour bleeding happens. Other symptoms include pain in the lower abdomen and frequent urination.

Diagnosis

From the most noninvasive to the most invasive diagnostic test, these include:

1. Urine microscopy to detect cancer cells in the urine
2. Cystoscopy A tube inserted into the urethra to look into the inner wall of the bladder is highly diagnostic
3. Ultrasound, CT Scan, and biopsy can also be further used to identify severity of the tumour.

Treatment

Once the tumour is diagnosed, treatment would depend on the severity of the tumour. For both invasive and noninvasive tumours, definitive therapy is surgery, known as transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT). The cancerous bladder tissue is removed through a cystoscope as done for diagnosis. The bladder is then flushed with chemotherapy agent to kill any residual cancer cells in the bladder. This is then followed by BCG vaccine, which is again done 1 to 4 weeks for several months to avoid recurrence. In some cases, radiotherapy may also be included.

2975 people found this helpful
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