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Prevention of Blockage Post Angioplasty Stent Surgery Tips

Diet After Angioplasty

Dt. Neha Suryawanshi 97% (15564 ratings)
M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Diet After Angioplasty

You may need to have an angioplasty if the carotid artery in your neck becomes blocked. During angioplasty, your surgeon will place a small tube through an incision in your groin and guide it up to your neck at the site of the blockage. The surgeon will then place a stent – a balloon-like device – in the artery to widen it and relieve the blockage. Because blocked arteries cause you to have a high risk for heart attack and other cardiovascular events, your doctor is likely to recommend a special diet to help your recovery.

Clear liquids

Immediately following your surgery, your doctor will likely place you on a clear liquid diet. This diet may only be for a few hours following your procedure, to allow your body to rest. Foods allowed on a clear liquid diet include water, plain tea and coffee, ice pops without fruit chunks and thin broths. As soon as your doctor feels appropriate, he will upgrade your diet.

Full liquids

If you are still experiencing negative symptoms of your anesthesia, such as nausea or vomiting, your doctor might decide to put you on a full liquid diet to ease your stomach discomfort. This diet includes all foods allowed on the clear liquid diet, as well as semi-liquid foods like pudding, yogurt, milk, cream of wheat and cream soups. While this is often a helpful step in the transition of your diet after surgery, your doctor may choose to skip full liquids and progress directly to a regular diet if you only have a short hospital stay.

Low fat diet

To protect your heart and arteries from further problems, a diet low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol is the recommendation. You should make this diet a permanent lifestyle change. While you still need some fat in your diet, try to keep total fat under 30 percent of your daily calories, and keep saturated fat under 7 percent. Choose low-fat food options, including lean meats and low-fat dairy.


Low sodium

In addition to your low-fat diet, your doctor might recommend a low-sodium diet. This is because sodium causes fluid retention, which can build up around your heart and cause heart failure. To protect your heart, you should only consume between 1,500 and 2,300 mg of sodium daily. Sodium is in many processed and prepackaged foods; limit your sodium intake by cooking with fresh ingredients. Always look for the sodium content on nutrition labels. If it contains 5 percent of the daily value or less, it is low in sodium.

3 people found this helpful

Know The Difference Between Multivessel Stenting And Bypass Surgery!

MD-Physician, Fellow. Cardiology, Fellow. Diabetology
Cardiologist, Vadodara
Know The Difference Between Multivessel Stenting And Bypass Surgery!

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.



How are they performed: Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better: In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.

Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

If you are one of these patients and this concern plagues you, it is recommended to talk to your cardiologist without much delay.

1849 people found this helpful

Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which is Better?

DM Cardiology
Cardiologist, Delhi
Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which is Better?

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.

How are they performed: Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better: In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.


Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

If you are one of these patients and this concern plagues you, it is recommended to talk to a cardiologist without much delay.

3743 people found this helpful

Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which Is Better?

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DNB (Cardiology)
Cardiologist, Pune
Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which Is Better?

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.

How are they performed?

Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better?

In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.

Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

If you are one of these patients and this concern plagues you, it is recommended to talk to your cardiologist without much delay.

5 people found this helpful

Multivessel Stenting Or Bypass Surgery - Understanding The Difference!

Multi-Speciality Clinic
Cardiologist, Hyderabad
Multivessel Stenting Or Bypass Surgery - Understanding The Difference!

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.

How are they performed: Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better: In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.


Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3753 people found this helpful

What Are The Difference Between Multivessel Stenting and Bypass Surgery?

MBBS, MD - Cardiology, DM
Cardiologist, Mumbai
What Are The Difference Between Multivessel Stenting and Bypass Surgery?

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.

How are they performed: Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better: In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.


Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

If you are one of these patients and this concern plagues you, it is recommended to talk to your cardiologist without much delay. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a cardiologist.

2744 people found this helpful

Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which Should Be Preferred?

MCh - Cardio Thoracic & Vascular Surgery, MBBS, MS - General Surgery
Cardiologist, Bhopal
Multivessel Stenting Vs Bypass Surgery - Which Should Be Preferred?

The results of a study conducted by the Department of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Korea, show that multivessel coronary stenting can be performed with a high success rate along with an acceptable clinical outcome. Coronary stenting has proven itself to be an accepted means for treating of obstructed coronary arteries. The need for multivessel coronary stenting has been inflated because of the larger number of patients with unfavourable cardiac profiles. Conventionally, bypass surgery is regarded as a standard means for relieving angina in cardiac patients with multivessel coronary disease as it could lead to a downright revascularization. Further, it also allows a prolongation of lifespan in a specified subgroup of patients.

How are they performed: Despite the coming of modern generation of stents, patients with multiple stringent arteries in the heart receiving coronary after bypass have recovered better than those whose arteries were grafted with balloon angioplasty or stenting. This report is presented in the 64th Annual Scientific Session in the American College of Cardiology. This report echoes past studies which shows that patients afflicted with multiple narrowed arteries receive better results with coronary artery bypass grafting, which is also known as CABG or bypass heart surgery. In case of multivessel stenting, which is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI, a stent is put within the arteries to hold it wide open and facilitate the flow of blood.

Which one is better: In a new study, it is reported that patients with new stents are susceptible to 47% higher risk of any of the outcomes like death or cardiac arrest as compared to patients who undergo bypass surgery. In CABG, a vein or artery from other parts of the body is grafted on the constricted coronary artery for allowing easy blood flow to and from heart. This study reinforces present regulations that recommend CABG to treat patients with substantial constrictions in various arteries, a condition often termed as multivessel coronary artery ailment.

Renowned cardiologist Seung Jung Park from Asan Medical Centre in Seoul, South Korea opines that CABG is still a much preferred option on the basis of their medical data. Another study known as Bypass Surgery Versus Everolimus - Eluting Stent Implantation for Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease or BEST trial deserves mention. It is one of the two randomly controlled trials for comparing bypass to angioplasty since the introduction of modernised stents that emits medication, which would prevent blood clot.

This study was implemented on 880 patients at 27 healthcare centres in four countries. Each patient had multivessel coronary artery disease and were determined to be equally eligible to go through either of the methods. Half of these patients were randomly chosen to be given angioplasty with everolimus-eluting stents, and the other half received bypass surgery.

All the patients were tracked for about five years and during this prolonged follow up, angioplasty was related to a considerable upsurge in the incidence of myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and often death. Because, it is a more invasive process, bypass surgery is normally recommended only for patients afflicted with higher-risk constrictions in more than one artery.

If you are one of these patients and this concern plagues you, it is recommended to talk to a cardiologist without much delay.

11 people found this helpful

All About Angioplasty

MBBS, MS (Gen. Surgery), M.Ch - Cardio Thoracic & Vascular Surgery, DNB (CTS)
Cardiologist, Noida
All About Angioplasty

Angioplasty is referred to as a cardiac procedure, which involves widening the narrowed section of a coronary artery. Usually performed by an interventional cardiologist, this procedure is performed in a cardiac catheterization lab, short for a cath lab. An interventional cardiologist takes extra care to review the risks, in addition to obtaining your counsel prior to preparing you for the procedure. The physician also refers to your medical history in order to determine the amount of anesthesia that should be used.

What happens during the procedure?
Although mild sedatives will be administered to help you relax, the process requires you to remain awake throughout the procedure. The procedure of angioplasty involves cardiac catheterization. The doctor numbs the intended site through medications and inserts the catheter. Following such the doctor inserts a thin sheath in your artery, oftentimes in your groin or arm. A long, narrow, empty tube known as a catheter, is then carefully guided through the sheath, through the blood vessels and into the arteries near the heart. 

A little amount of liquid is then injected through the catheter, which is moved through the chambers, valves and vessels of the heart. This movement is then pictured with the help of X-rays, with which the doctors can diagnose the condition and working of the coronary arteries and the heart valve.

The surgical procedure lasts for around 1.5 - 2.5 hours, but the preparation and post - surgical procedures may take several hours. A patient is usually made to stay overnight to be monitored by medical personnel.

What to expect before an Angioplasty?
Most people are made to undergo a blood test and electrocardiogram before having an angioplasty. Usually scheduled a day before the procedure, such tests usually require separate appointments. Usually patients are restricted to eat since 12 hours before the exam.

What happens post-procedure?
After the procedure, you will be instructed to remain flat for 5-6 hours without bending your legs, so as to prevent bleeding. The nurse will instruct you as to when you can get up from your bed. You may not be permitted to drink or eat until the groin sheath is removed as such can cause nausea.

According to the procedure, the doctor will provide you with adequate after care advice.

4485 people found this helpful

Know More About Angioplasty!

MBBS, PG Diploma In Clinical Cosmetology (PGDCC)
Cardiologist, Purba
Know More About Angioplasty!

Angioplasty is referred to as a cardiac procedure, which involves widening the narrowed section of a coronary artery. Usually performed by an interventional cardiologist, this procedure is performed in a cardiac catheterization lab, short for a cath lab. An interventional cardiologist takes extra care to review the risks, in addition to obtaining your counsel prior to preparing you for the procedure. The physician also refers to your medical history in order to determine the amount of anesthesia that should be used.

What happens during the procedure?
Although mild sedatives will be administered to help you relax, the process requires you to remain awake throughout the procedure. The procedure of angioplasty involves cardiac catheterization. The doctor numbs the intended site through medications and inserts the catheter. Following such the doctor inserts a thin sheath in your artery, oftentimes in your groin or arm. A long, narrow, empty tube known as a catheter, is then carefully guided through the sheath, through the blood vessels and into the arteries near the heart. 

A little amount of liquid is then injected through the catheter, which is moved through the chambers, valves and vessels of the heart. This movement is then pictured with the help of X-rays, with which the doctors can diagnose the condition and working of the coronary arteries and the heart valve.

The surgical procedure lasts for around 1.5 - 2.5 hours, but the preparation and post - surgical procedures may take several hours. A patient is usually made to stay overnight to be monitored by medical personnel.

What to expect before an Angioplasty?
Most people are made to undergo a blood test and electrocardiogram before having an angioplasty. Usually scheduled a day before the procedure, such tests usually require separate appointments. Usually patients are restricted to eat since 12 hours before the exam.

What happens post-procedure?
After the procedure, you will be instructed to remain flat for 5-6 hours without bending your legs, so as to prevent bleeding. The nurse will instruct you as to when you can get up from your bed. You may not be permitted to drink or eat until the groin sheath is removed as such can cause nausea. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a cardiologist.

2093 people found this helpful

Options to Angioplasty - A Scientific Understanding!

PhD, Human Energy Fields, Diploma in PIP, EFI, Aura scanning for Health evaluation; Energy field assessment, Fellowship Cardiac Rehabilitation, Cardiac Rehabilitation, MD (Ayur - Mind Body Med), Mind Body Medicine
Non-Invasive Conservative Cardiac Care Specialist, Pune
Options to Angioplasty - A Scientific Understanding!

When a person suffers from the typical symptoms of heart weakness that includes breathlessness, weakness, sudden sweating, discomfort while doing minor exertions, chest pain, pain radiating along the arms, back, neck and shoulders and other symptoms, the Doctor will ask for investigations to study the heart.

The Heart is a muscular organ in the chest and like any other muscle in the body, it has its own unique blood vessel network that does the function of supplying nutrition to the heart muscles. Like any network, the Cardiac blood supply also begins with major vessels that branch off into minor and then very small blood vessels. It is these very small blood vessels that actually reach the muscle fiber to give nutrition.

When this is a problem with the free flowing blood to reach the muscle cells, the strength of the heart muscles reduces and the overall heart functioning is in trouble. Until now, it was commonly believed that cholesterol deposits make blockages in the blood vessels that cut off nutrition supply causing the heart to go into disease stage. Today, extensive research has proved that there are many reasons for hampered blood supply to heart muscles, and plaque formation (blockages caused by cholesterol deposits) need not be the reason for heart attacks entirely. Blood vessel disease called Atherosclerosis is the root cause.

In modern times, if the patient consults a cardiologist, the first line of investigation prescribed is the Angiography. This procedure requires the patient to be admitted to the hospital. Under anesthesia, the Doctor will make a cut/incision in a major blood vessel of the thigh joint or the arm. He will then insert a tube called catheter into the blood vessel and guide it through the major arteries till it reaches the important position from where the blood vessels that supply nutritious blood to the heart muscles is reached. At this position, a dye is pushed into the blood flow and a series of specialized X-rays are taken that will show the blood vessels.

In these images, it is the Doctor’s expertise that will identify positions where the blood flow is reduced, or disturbed. The dye has a short life span and is able to show flow dynamics only up to the secondary blood vessel network. The Doctor will determine which part of the heart blood vessels are affected based on these images, the length of the plaque, position and kind of blockage and derive the damage to heart, based on these anatomical visuals. The catheter is then removed; the blood vessel opening stemmed and the patient has to remain immobile in the hospital till the blood vessel improves. The Doctor will prescribe a list of medication that includes beta blockers, aspirins, statin and antibiotics.

Very often, if the Doctor decides, he will suggest the next procedure of Angioplasty immediately. This procedure involves pushing a mini wireframe tube called ‘stent’ or an inflatable balloon through the same catheter to the area of blockage. This balloon or stent is guided to the area of the blockage and mechanically expanded to push aside the plaque to help the blood flow resume. There are different kinds of balloon and stent procedures.

None of these procedures “removes” the blockage plaque. The procedure helps to resume blood flow in the major arteries only. 

No invasive therapy is safe and there is a lot of reports backed by Research Data from very reputed global authoritative organizations that highlight the unnecessary number of angio procedures being done as well as the side effects of these procedures within few months. (Many Stent Procedures Unnecessary” Heart Drugs Just as Good at Preventing Heart Attacks, Death in Some People, Study Shows By Charlene Laino: March 26, 2007 (New Orleans).

Can blockage affect a person after having angiography?

It is important for the patient and patient’s family to understand that the blockage formation process in the body does not reverse with an angioplasty or even a Bypass procedure. The patient suffers from the same kind of symptoms as earlier when new blockages form in different sections of the coronary network or very often, when a deposit / scar forms within the stent itself leading to hampered blood flow. This ‘reformation of blockages’ is referred to as restenosis. This is the greatest problem registered in current studies of patients after angio and bypass and this is seen within few weeks to after 10 to 14 months of the procedure.

The reformation of blockages or further formation of new sites with blockages depends on the individual patients health condition. Patients who are Diabetic, High BP, on certain kind of long term medication, obese, with bad lifestyle; all have the additional threat of secondary attacks.

Restenosis cannot be prevented with another stent or bypass procedure. The procedure only once again’ mechanically opens the blockage or in CABG, creates a bypass around the blocked blood vessel.

How can restenosis be prevented?

The only and best way to avoid restenosis is to make major changes in diet, exercise, weight management, stress management. It is also very important to be under the right kind of medication that will support the natural process done by the Liver and blood to reduce and wash out inflammation (that causes maximum problems in natural blood flow), repair blood vessels, reduce and remove existing blockages and scar tissue within blood vessels, add strength to the heart muscles.

Ayurveda has many proved medication combinations that include Arjuna (improves Heart muscle condition) Draksha (powerful anti-oxidant and liver repair) Dadimba (Pomegranate is known to participate in repair of blood vessels and rebuild damaged vessels called Angiogenesis), Ashwagandha (Cardio-protective) and Colostrum (powerful immunity modulator, participate in muscular and nerve repair, Angiogenesis Growth Factor, Endothelial growth Factor, Nerve growth factor, PDGF, natural Vitamins and Minerals).

These treatments are now available in select Ayurvedic treatment centres and are also being proved with clinical pre and post investigations to support their success.

These new studies and treatments options should be searched out by the patient and his/her family to understand the reason of blockages, the possible need and safety of invasive procedures, the option to medicine based treatments before undertaking any invasive procedure. Remember, it is scientific research that has clearly proclaimed that less than 30 -20% of all the angio’s performed are necessary or have lasting effect on their own.

3314 people found this helpful
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