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Pregnancy Complications Health Feed

Pregnancy - Know Complications During It!

Pregnancy - Know Complications During It!

Becoming pregnant is indeed the most special experience for any woman and should be enjoyed. However, at this point you’re not looking only after yourself but also an unborn baby. Hence complications that occur during pregnancy affect both the health of the mother and the baby if not addressed and treated in time.

Here are a few health conditions that are commonly experienced by pregnant women.

  1. AnemiaA drop in hemoglobin levels or red blood cells count is termed as anemia. In most cases, this is triggered by iron deficiency. You may also feel excessively tired, look pale and experience shortness of breath. Taking iron and folic acid supplements can stabilize iron levels and treat anemia.
  2. Gestational diabetesBlood sugar levels often fluctuate during pregnancy. The body’s inability of processing sugars and starch is known as gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can be diagnosed with a glucose screening test and an oral glucose tolerance test. If untreated, this can lead to a number of complications during delivery and preeclampsia. Eating a healthy, balanced diet and getting regular exercise can help stabilize blood sugar levels and prevent this condition.
  3. DepressionFor some women, the joy of being pregnant can be overshadowed by extreme sadness. This could be a result of hormonal changes, stress or changes in the brain chemistry. Depression can harm both you and your baby by not motivating you to take care of yourself at this time. To deal with this, avoid alcohol and tobacco smoke both first hand and second hand. Build a support system and if need be consult a mental health professional as well.
  4. Preeclampsia: This is a condition that can begin around the 20th week of pregnancy. It causes blurred vision, high blood pressure, abdominal pain, dizziness, headaches and swelling of the hands. In some cases, it also causes seizures. Preeclampsia can result in premature delivery as well as trigger a number of other maternal and fetal risks. It can be managed with oral or intravenous medication but only delivery can cure the condition. A regular antenatal checkup should be done. 
  5. Urinary tract infections: Fluctuation in hormone levels can lead to changes in the urinary tract thus, increasing the risk of catching a urinary tract infection. In addition to this, the growing baby in the uterus puts pressure on the bladder and does not allow the bladder to be completely emptied. This stagnant urine is another leading cause of urinary tract infections. Along with kidney infections, it can also cause premature delivery and low birth weight of the baby.
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Hello Mam, 2 days after follicle study 3 eggs got ruptured for me. Mam when should I start taking duphaston 10 mg. My doctor mam asked 2 have from 2 days orally. Before intercourse. Should I start by 2-day t tomorrow for 10 days? Pls do suggest to me, mam. Need help. Urgent. Tq in advance a tonn.

Hello Mam, 2 days after follicle study 3 eggs got ruptured for me. Mam when should I start taking duphaston 10 mg. My...
If you are undergoing just ovulation induction treatment you in fact don't need any medication for luteal phase support like duphaston. Duphaston is a type of progesterone that is required to be given only in cases of some iui and ivf treatment cycles. If you are trying to conceive naturally or have received only ovulation inducing drugs you don't need to take any duphaston. Try to have regular intercourse at the time near to ovulation.
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How To Handle Thyroid During Pregnancy?

How To Handle Thyroid During Pregnancy?

Nothing can be more gratifying than welcoming your bundle of joy into this world. Care needs to be taken during pregnancy to ensure that the developing foetus is healthy. Many pregnant women suffer from Thyroid problems. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is an important hormone produced by the Pituitary gland. TSH regulates the production and action of the Thyroid Hormones (T3 and T4). Estrogen and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin also affects the production of the thyroid hormones. Abnormal level of thyroid hormones in the body can result in Hyperthyroidism (increased production of thyroid hormones) or Hypothyroidism (decreased production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland). These conditions, if left untreated, can prove to be fatal for the mother and the baby.

Hyperthyroidism is greatly affected by an autoimmune disease, the Graves disease. The Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin (TSI), produced during Graves disease, interferes with the production of the thyroid hormones. The TSI mimics the TSH to a great extent. This triggers the thyroid gland to produce the thyroid hormones in excess. A woman with hyperthyroidism may complain of increased heart rate, fatigue and increased blood pressure. There may be heat intolerance, tremor, sudden weight loss and Hyperemesis Gravidarum.

Untreated Hyperthyroidism can result in heart ailments, premature child birth, foetal Tachycardia, Preeclampsia (a pregnancy complication characterised by an abnormal rise in blood pressure) and miscarriage. In case of foetal and neonatal Hyperthyroidism, there is low birth weight, heart ailments, irritability and poor brain development.

Blood tests, whereby the levels of T3, T4, TSH and TSI are examined, can help in the diagnosis of Hyperthyroidism. Women with Graves disease should be extra careful. Antithyroid drugs can provide great relief. Most antithyroid drugs successfully cross the placenta and effectively regulate the production of the foetal thyroid hormone. Propylthiouracil (PTU) and Methimazole are effective anti-thyroid drugs.
Most doctors recommend Methimazole during the first trimester and PTU during the last two trimesters.
In case of Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto disease is the main wrecker in chief. This autoimmune disease results in considerable decrease in the production of thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism can also be aggravated by Thyroidectomy (surgical removal of thyroid gland). Like hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism during pregnancy can result in serious health complications. There may be stillbirths, congestive heart failure, miscarriage, anaemia, poor brain development of the newborn and Preeclampsia. Symptoms like cold intolerance, muscle cramps, concentration problems, fatigue or constipation should not be taken lightly.

Blood tests (T4 and TSH) go a long way to detect Hypothyroidism. A synthetic Thyroid hormone, Thyroxine, is effectively used to treat hypothyroidism. Including iodine supplements in your diet prove to be helpful in hyperthyroidism treatment.
Thyroid problems, though serious, can be successfully treated. A little alertness during pregnancy can shield both the mother and the newborn from the harmful consequences.

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According to my follicular study, I ovulated on 31st May. On 12th June I had a little bit of bleeding. On 15th June I tested +ve on home pregnancy kit. My concern is whether it's normal to bleed or was it an early miscarriage? Am I pregnant or not?

According to my follicular study, I ovulated on 31st May. On 12th June I had a little bit of bleeding. On 15th June I...
It's not normal to bleed during pregnancy. If spotting has occurred, take care. Don't do heavy work. Restful life. Light food. Get blood test for beta hcg. Ultrasound abdomen to get a clear picture of pregnancy.
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How to stop bleeding? How to cure cysts at home to be pregnant? And I have thyroid also.

How to stop bleeding? How to cure cysts at home to be pregnant? And I have thyroid also.
PCOD/PCOS is a common hormonal disorder in women which can lead to weight gain and irregular periods. While most women depend on pills to deal with it, these simple changes in your lifestyle will help you deal with the condition in a better way. 1. Nutritional approach: Deficiency of micronutrients contributes to insulin insensitivity and compromise ovarian function. So, • Completely stay away from processed/ refined cereals (which have a high glycemic index or GI). Switch to wheat, rice, jowar, ragi, barley (which have low GI) and enjoy your roti, parantha, pulao, biryani, dosa, poha, upma etc. • Eat an adequate amount of lean proteins like dal, milk, eggs, fish, yogurt, cheese, paneer, lassi, sprouted legumes. • Include good sources of omega-3 and omega-6 present in nuts, seeds, ghee, olives, coconut etc. Our body needs essential fatty acids for absorption of fat soluble vitamins like A, D, and E. • Alpha-lipoic acid improves glucose uptake in cells, promotes weight loss and improves the health of ovaries. It is found in flaxseeds, walnuts, spinach, broccoli, peas, Brussels sprouts etc. • Micronutrients like selenium, zinc, chromium, magnesium, niacin, and riboflavin improve sugar control and promote hormonal balance. These can be obtained from a variety of whole grains, nuts, green leaves, fresh fruits and veggies, egg, seafood etc. • Vitamin B12 is essential to support the function of ovaries. So include dairy (especially curd, paneer), eggs, seafood, and sprouted/fermented items. • Calcium in abundant supply helps to overcome premenstrual cramps. • Include supplements of above-mentioned nutrients as diet may not provide enough because their requirement is above normal. • Most importantly, eat local, seasonal, freshly prepared food items, stay away from food items that have long ingredient lists as they are 'processed' and have a number of additives (preservatives, artificial colors, flavor enhancers et al). 2. Exercise strategies: Regular workouts are non-negotiable. They are essential to burn off fat stores for hormonal balance and regular ovulation. A minimum of 150 minutes a week is recommended. Divide your time between strength training, cardio exercises and yoga for optimal results. Just like a diet, your exercise must be balanced too. 3. Sleep: Adequate sleep is non-negotiable too. Sleeping at a more or less fixed time every day and for an adequate number of hours is a prerequisite to keep hormones in sync. 4. De-stress yourself: Love yourself more than anyone else, prioritize your health, learn to say no, take time out to exercise and relax. Pursue your favorite activities, learn a new skill, and never ignore your body signals. For more details u can consult me.
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Risk Of Diabetes During Pregnancy!

Risk Of Diabetes During Pregnancy!

Gestational diabetes, as the name suggests, occurs during gestation or pregnancy when the blood sugar levels exceed the normal level. Gestational diabetes, like other forms of diabetes, affects how your body cells use glucose or sugar during pregnancy, and usually disappears after you’ve given birth.

Causes and symptoms to look out for!
During gestation, the placenta produces hormones that lead to the accumulation of blood glucose. Under normal condition, the pancreas forms enough insulin to counter the buildup of blood glucose. The level of blood sugar rises when the pancreas fails to produce adequate insulin to manage your blood sugar.

Usually, women with gestational diabetes do not show symptoms. So, the presence of the condition can go unnoticed if they are not diagnosed during routine checkups and screening tests. Nevertheless, if the condition goes out of control, you may feel tired, feel thirsty or hungry, or feel the urge to urinate more often.

What are the risk factors?
About 2-10% of pregnant women are affected by gestational diabetes every year. The following factors are likely to put you at risk of developing gestational diabetes-

  1. Excess body weight- You may develop gestational diabetes if you were overweight or had gained excess weight (BMI equal to or greater than 30) before getting pregnant
  2. Family history- Women who have a family history of diabetes are likely to have gestational diabetes.
  3. Age- Women aged more than 25 years are at a greater risk of developing this condition.
  4. Diabetic history- A slightly raised blood sugar level may act as the precursor to Type-2 diabetes, which in turn increases your chance of getting affected by gestational diabetes.
  5. Previous pregnancy- Women who’ve previously given birth to a child weighing more than 4.1 Kg (9 pounds), or have delivered a stillborn child are likely to have gestational diabetes.

What is the treatment for gestational diabetes?
Urine tests are performed to check for ketones. In a non-diabetic person, glucagon, insulin and other hormones avert ketone levels in your blood from soaring up too high. Once you’re diagnosed with gestational diabetes, it’s important that you consult your doctor for treatment. Uncontrolled blood sugar level can affect you and your baby’s health after birth. This condition can be treated in the following ways-

  1. Keep a check on your blood sugar- During pregnancy, your doctor will have you tested for gestational diabetes 4-5times a day to keep a tab on your blood glucose level. For this, a small drop of blood is first drawn from the finger using a needle. The sample of blood is then placed on the test strip inserted into a device called the blood glucose meter to measure and monitor the level of blood sugar in your body.
  2. Medication- Anti-diabetic medications and insulin are prescribed to control the amount of glucose or sugar in the bloodstream. Your doctor may also suggest oral medications like Diabeta and Glynase to manage your blood glucose level.
  3. Healthy diet- Diabetic diet- one that helps control blood sugar levels- is highly prescribed by doctors during pregnancy. Cut down on carbohydrates and sugar, and switch to food items that provide your body sufficient nutrients and calories.

Post-treatment the blood sugar levels usually come down to normal within 4-6 weeks of giving birth.

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