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Menopause Tips

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women's gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB, as it is popularly called, can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

  • Atrophic vaginitis: Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
  • Endometrial atrophy: Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
  • Polyps: Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding.
  • Infections: General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding.
  • Cancers: Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis: As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding. Diagnostic methods could include the following:

  1. Physical examination
  2. Transvaginal ultrasound
  3. Endometrial biopsy
  4. Hysteroscopy
  5. Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment: Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis. For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy. For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient. Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

Cancer: This would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases. So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after a year of menopause, do not ignore it.

Is Postmenopausal Bleeding Normal?

Is Postmenopausal Bleeding Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

- Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
- Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
- Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding
- Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding
- Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis

As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following:

- Physical exam
- Transvaginal ultrasound
- Endometrial biopsy
- Hysteroscopy
- Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment

- Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis.

- For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

- For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient.

- Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

- Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases.

So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

2 people found this helpful

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

- Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
- Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
- Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding
- Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding
- Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis

As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following:

- Physical exam
- Transvaginal ultrasound
- Endometrial biopsy
- Hysteroscopy
- Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment

Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis

- For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

- For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient.

- Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

- Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases.

So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

1 person found this helpful

Menopause - Can Homeopathy Assist In It?

Menopause - Can Homeopathy Assist In It?

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.
2. Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers etc.
3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.
4. Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.
5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.
6. Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.
7. Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.
8. Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.
9. Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.
10. Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.
11. Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.
12. Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.


 

 

Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Treat It?

Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Treat It?

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.

2. Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers etc.

3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.

4. Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.

5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.

6. Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.

7. Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.

8. Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.

9. Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.

10. Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.

11. Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.

12. Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.


 

 

1 person found this helpful

Low Ovarian Reserve - Know More About It!

Low Ovarian Reserve - Know More About It!

The ovarian reserves in any women mean the quality of reproduction of the eggs in the women. However, low ovarian reserves indicate that there are factors due to which the quality of ovaries to reproduce is diminishing and causing infertility in women. Many factors are contributing to this condition, but aging is the prime cause of low ovarian reserve. Studies have shown that low ovarian reserves can be treated with new age medical science and reproduction technology.

Leading Causes of Low Ovarian Reserves-

As mentioned above, generally menopause and aging are the causes of the diminished quality of eggs in women. However, with the change in time, doctors have noticed below-mentioned causes too for this condition:

 Genetic problems like tender chromosome X or distressed chromosome present in women.
History of ovarian surgery: If the patient has undergone any ovarian surgery in the past, it may result in low ovarian reserves.
Smoking cigarettes: Smoking actively and passively hinders the ovaries of women. It results in inhalation of harmful gas and can cause low ovarian reserves.
Any other environmental factors like exposure to radiation, exposure to chemicals or radioactive waves, etc.

Symptoms of Low Ovarian Reserves-
There are no such symptoms noted by patients in low ovarian reserves. The problems faced by patient are trouble in conceiving and not being able to have a baby. Some women may also observe a delay in their period cycles, depletion of bleeding or spotting before period cycles.

Diagnosis of Low Ovarian Reserves-
There is a debate regarding the diagnosis method of this condition. However, doctors use the combination of ultrasound of vaginal area and testing of hormones. The combination of both helps the endocrinologists to determine the quality and number of eggs in the women to reproduce successfully. The hormone evaluations include the level checking of FSH, estrogen, and the AMH. The evaluation takes by testing the level of FSH and AMH in women in her early days of menstrual cycle. These are good indicators of fertility in women. FSH helps to determine the stimulation of fertility and ability to conceive, and AMH indicates the number of quality eggs women carry.

Treatment-
There are several treatments available for low ovarian reserves condition. But, IVF method along with donors’ eggs fertilization is considered the best. The aging of the ovaries cannot be stopped. But, when a woman notices the symptoms and causes as mentioned earlier, she can freeze her ovaries which can be used later. However, this method entails risks and gets affected by other factors. In the donor eggs method, fertilization takes place with the partner's sperm and pregnancy can be achieved by implanting the embryo in recipient womb. However, the characteristics of the baby will not match as the birth mother but will match the egg donor. The recipient mother will only get to carry the baby till the time of delivery. An early course of IVF is the only option left with the women facing problems of low ovarian reserves. Other methods are time taking and involve high cost. They do not guarantee safe and successful pregnancy and childbirth. Consulting a doctor is always recommended before going for any method.

1946 people found this helpful

Menopause - Have Homeopathy At Your Rescue!

Menopause - Have Homeopathy At Your Rescue!

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depressionnausea and fatigue.

While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

  1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.
  2. Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers, etc.
  3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.
  4. Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.
  5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oatsbarley, carrots, fenugreekrice, etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.
  6. Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.
  7. Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.
  8. Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.
  9. Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urinationosteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.
  10. Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.
  11. Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.
  12. Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.
1751 people found this helpful

Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Take Care Of It?

Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Take Care Of It?

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.

2. Homeopathic medicines can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods like meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers, etc.

3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.

4. Homeopathic medicines can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.

5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.

6. Homeopathic medicines are used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.

7. Some of the homeopathic medicines are made of a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.

8. Homeopathic medicines are a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.

9. Homeopathic medicines are beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.

10. Some of the homeopathic medicines which come from a flowering plant are used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.

11. Some of the homeopathic medicines, in small amounts, help to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.

12. Homeopathic medicines are corrmon for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.

1737 people found this helpful

Vaginal Rejuvenation - Can PRP Help In It?

Vaginal Rejuvenation - Can PRP Help In It?

Vaginal rejuvenation is gaining more popularity by the day. Pregnancy, childbirth, menopause can disfigure a woman’s genital area. Not only does her vagina undergo changes but several medical conditions may creep in as well. Ailments such as vaginal atrophy, lack of lubrication, urinary incontinence, laxity of the vagina, sexual dysfunction might affect a woman’s sexual health, and can even trigger insecurities and melancholy. But, there are ways you can undo these issues with vaginal rejuvenation through PRP.

What triggers Changes in the Vagina?

• A woman’s vagina goes through tremendous changes under the influence of hormones.
• Vaginal deliveries can lead to laxity of the vagina.
• Menopause can cause dramatic changes to her private parts especially narrowing of vaginal orifice and vagina.
Hormonal imbalance can lead to vaginal dryness or atrophy.

All of this may make sexual activities painful. This is when a woman should consider vaginal rejuvenation.

What is Vaginal Rejuvenation?

Vaginal rejuvenation is a process when a doctor will use therapy to treat the vaginal condition that you have been diagnosed with or to enhance the appearance of your vagina that may have suffered disfigurement with age.

1. Non-surgical PRP Vaginal Rejuvenation - Vaginal rejuvenation does not have to be performed through surgery. There are minimally invasive ways to do it. One such very popular procedure is instillation of Plasma Rich Platelet (PRP) through injection.

2. PRP for Vaginal Rejuvenation - PRP is prepared from patients own blood. Small amount of blood is needed for this purpose. PRP when injected trigger growth and cell repair. The PRP is injected into the vagina (wall of the vagina or the clitoris). This speeds up the generation of stem cells. New tissues are created that eradicate the problem of laxity, narrowing, infections, urinary incontinence, etc. Moreover, PRP injection also boosts secretion of collagen and elastin- both are instrumental for the supple and flexible vaginal wall. It also enhances the sensitivity of both the vagina and the clitoris. This makes a woman more responsive during sex by helping her in arousal. It is a safe and highly effective procedure.

1875 people found this helpful

Prolapsed Bladder & Menopause - Is There A Link?

Prolapsed Bladder & Menopause - Is There A Link?

Bladder prolapse is a condition wherein a woman’s vaginal wall ceases to adequately support the urinary bladder. The front wall of the vagina gives support to the bladder under normal circumstances but when this wall weakens, it allows the bladder to droop and become prolapsed. This can lead to a wide range of medical problems such as urinary difficulties, stress incontinence (leakage of urine while coughing or sneezing), pain and discomfort, etc.

Prolapsed bladders are generally associated with menopause. Also known as cystoceles or fallen bladders, they are categorized into four different types depending on the extent to which the bladder has prolapsed.

Grade 1: This is the mild stage wherein a small portion of the bladder droops into the vagina.
Grade 2: This is the moderate stage in which the bladder droops far enough to reach the opening of the vagina.
Grade 3: This is when the condition becomes severe and the bladder protrudes from the body through the opening of the vagina.
Grade 4: This occurs when the bladder has completely prolapsed. The entire bladder protrudes outside the vagina and is normally associated with other forms of pelvic organ prolapse such as uterine prolapse (the sagging of the uterus from its normal spot) and rectocele (prolapse of the wall between the vagina and the rectum).

What are the causes of prolapsed bladders?
Following are the factors that lead to the condition of prolapsed bladders:

  1. Menopause: The vaginal walls are known to become weak upon the onset of menopause. This occurs because the body inhibits the production of oestrogen, the hormone that renders strength to the muscles of the vagina. As a result, the bladder is no longer supported by the vagina.
  2. Childbirth: The process of childbirth puts a tremendous amount of stress on the vagina and often leads to deterioration of the muscles of the vaginal wall. This, in turn, leads to the condition of prolapsed bladder.
  3. Straining: Anything that puts a strain on the walls of the vagina can lead to this condition. This includes lifting heavy objects, chronic constipation, obesity, excessive coughing and sneezing or any other factor that damages the pelvic floor.

What are the symptoms of a prolapsed bladder?

Symptoms of a prolapsed bladder vary from case to case, depending on the category and extent of the condition. Some of the most commonly experienced symptoms of the condition are as follows:
Tissue sticking out of the vagina (that may be tender and/or bleeding)

  1. Frequent urge to urinate
  2. Urinary incontinence (unwanted leakage of urine)
  3. Pain during urination
  4. Pain during sex
  5. Frequent urinary tract and bladder infections
  6. Pain in the vagina, pelvis, lower abdomen or lower back
  7. Incomplete urination
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