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Health Screening for Men Tips

What to Expect During STD Screening?

Dr. Vinod Raina 88% (5777 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
What to Expect During STD Screening?

From time to time, it's a good idea for a man to undergo an STD screening. This is true if a man is enjoying the company of more than one sexual partner, if he isn't sure that his partner is monogamous (or if he is not), or if he's thinking about unprotected sex with a steady partner for the first time. Men should consider STD screening an integral part of penis care, not something that can be overlooked or put off!

What happens during an STD screening?

For many men, the thought of a strange messing around with their junk is the stuff of nightmares - even if that inspection happens in a medical setting. Here's what a guy can expect:

1. A ton of questions. A guy will be asked a multitude of questions, and some of them might seem to be asking for 'too much information.' A doctor will need to know about a man's sexual history, how many partners he has had recently (or ever), what kind of sexual activity he engages in and any health issues that might have arisen during those encounters. The doctor will ask blunt questions and expect frank answers. This is not the time to be coy!

2. A physical examination. A guy can expect to have his equipment explored a bit by the physician. This will include a visual examination for any lesions, irritations, bumps, bruises, sores and the like. It will also include a physical examination in which the doctor will touch the penis and surrounding area. The goal is to find any lumps or bumps that can't be seen, only felt.

3. Swabs and urine tests. During an STD screening, the doctor might want to take samples for examination by a laboratory. In order to do this, swabbing is typically used. This means using an instrument that looks very much like a Q-tip, passing it over and around any questionable areas to pick up a variety of cells from that area, and then sending those cells to the lab for examination. A man might also be used to provide a urine sample.

4. Blood testing. Blood tests are extremely helpful in STD screening, as they pick up infections that might be latent in the body - meaning that there are no outward signs of it at the moment. Herpes is a good example of this. A man who is having an active outbreak shows signs of the problem, but during the times between outbreaks, it can be impossible to tell a man has herpes simply by looking at him. A blood test, however, can reveal the truth.

5. More invasive examinations. A man who is dealing with a particular issue might undergo more invasive testing. For instance, a guy who engages in regular anal play and complains of bleeding or pain in that area might be examined there to figure out what the problem might be. However, rest assured that the doctor will be gentle and try to cause as little embarrassment as possible. Doctors have seen it all, so nothing a guy says will shock them or make them view him differently.

Staying healthy

A man who is worried about STDs should take special care to prevent the problem by using condoms whenever he has sex with a new partner, ensuring he is in a monogamous relationship before going without protection, and getting STD screening on a regular basis, regardless of his relationship status.

When it comes to penis health, a man can also make great strides toward better penis care with a good penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Though no crème can prevent a sexually transmitted disease, the regular application of a crème indicates good penis hygiene; and that means a man will be faster to catch the first signs of an STD if he does contract one. A guy should look for a luxurious combination of Shea butter and vitamin E, as well as other nutrients and vitamins, to ensure his penis skin stays in tip-top shape.

5 people found this helpful

When is Lung Cancer Screening Recommended?

Dr. (Brig.) Ashok 88% (102 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Pulmonary Medicine, DNB - Pulmonary Medicine, MD - Internal Medicine, Diploma in Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases (DTCD)
Pulmonologist, Delhi
When is Lung Cancer Screening Recommended?

One of the major causes of death worldwide is lung cancer and it has been continuously affecting men and women accounting for about 150,000 deaths every year. Astonishingly, this figure is more than the combined death rate of the next three kinds of cancer, namely, colon, breast, and pancreatic cancer.

As with any type of cancer, lung cancer to has increased life expectancy when diagnosed in the earlier stages. Thus, being informed about the causes and signs of this deadly disease becomes critical to treat the condition.

The prevalent causes
The major risk factor for lung cancer is smoking and second-hand or passive smoking. The risks are increased when the smokers are exposed to other potential risk factors such as getting exposed radon and asbestos.

Who should be screened?

  • As said earlier, cancer when diagnosed early has an increased success rate for a cure.
  • Most people do not admit that they are vulnerable to lung cancer and this mindset has to be changed first and foremost.
  • There are many people who would benefit from an early diagnosis. This is because the modern medical procedures are highly beneficial in changing the lives of the affected, for better.
  • People, who are avid smokers or have a history of smoking, should always opt for lung cancer screening.
  • In this regard, it should be kept in mind that people, who have stopped smoking for the last 15 years, should also be tested.
  • People belonging to the age group of 55-80 and who have smoked in the past should also come under the screening procedure.

Who should not be tested and why?
Lung cancer is a ghastly disease, but still, it is advised that everyone should not be screened. These tests involve a lot of risks, which are indeed severe.

  • The first risk is the false-positive test result wherein the test confirms that the patient is suffering from the disease, but he is not.
  • The second risk is over-diagnosis where the cancer is at a benign stage, but there are unnecessary treatments considering it to be dangerous.

Lastly, there is the risk of exposure to radiation.

So, who is the right candidate?
Now the question arises, who should be asked to screen themselves for lung cancer? Or, when is the ideal time to for screening? Because of the risks associated with CT scanning and the chances of doing more harm than good to people who are not prone to having lung cancer, the doctors recommend screening to only those people who are at high risk. Unfortunately, the symptoms of this disease are almost nil in number. To be an ideal candidate for screening, the patient should be in good health and should have a smoking habit as mentioned above.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2747 people found this helpful

Who Should Be Screened for Lung Cancer?

Dr. Kamal Gera 86% (24 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Pulmonary Medicine
Pulmonologist, Faridabad
Who Should Be Screened for Lung Cancer?

One of the major causes of death worldwide is lung cancer and it has been continuously affecting men and women accounting for about 150,000 deaths every year. Astonishingly, this figure is more than the combined death rate of the next three kinds of cancer, namely, colon, breast, and pancreatic cancer.

As with any type of cancer, lung cancer to has increased life expectancy when diagnosed in the earlier stages. Thus, being informed about the causes and signs of this deadly disease becomes critical to treat the condition.

The prevalent causes
The major risk factor for lung cancer is smoking and second-hand or passive smoking. The risks are increased when the smokers are exposed to other potential risk factors such as getting exposed radon and asbestos.

Who should be screened?

  • As said earlier, cancer when diagnosed early has an increased success rate for a cure.
  • Most people do not admit that they are vulnerable to lung cancer and this mindset has to be changed first and foremost.
  • There are many people who would benefit from an early diagnosis. This is because the modern medical procedures are highly beneficial in changing the lives of the affected, for better.
  • People, who are avid smokers or have a history of smoking, should always opt for lung cancer screening.
  • In this regard, it should be kept in mind that people, who have stopped smoking for the last 15 years, should also be tested.
  • People belonging to the age group of 55-80 and who have smoked in the past should also come under the screening procedure.

Who should not be tested and why?
Lung cancer is a ghastly disease, but still, it is advised that everyone should not be screened. These tests involve a lot of risks, which are indeed severe.

  • The first risk is the false-positive test result wherein the test confirms that the patient is suffering from the disease, but he is not.
  • The second risk is over-diagnosis where the cancer is at a benign stage, but there are unnecessary treatments considering it to be dangerous.

Lastly, there is the risk of exposure to radiation.

So, who is the right candidate?
Now the question arises, who should be asked to screen themselves for lung cancer? Or, when is the ideal time to for screening? Because of the risks associated with CT scanning and the chances of doing more harm than good to people who are not prone to having lung cancer, the doctors recommend screening to only those people who are at high risk. Unfortunately, the symptoms of this disease are almost nil in number. To be an ideal candidate for screening, the patient should be in good health and should have a smoking habit as mentioned above.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2539 people found this helpful

Screening Tests for Common Diseases

Dr. Ramakanth Reddy 89% (153 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Screening Tests for Common Diseases

What is a screening test?

A screening test is done to detect potential health disorders or diseases in people who do not have any symptoms of disease. The goal is early detection and lifestyle changes or surveillance, to reduce the risk of disease, or to detect it early enough to treat it most effectively. Screening tests are not considered diagnostic, but are used to identify a subset of the population who should have additional testing to determine the presence or absence of disease.

When is a screening test helpful?

What makes a screening test valuable is its ability to detect potential problems, while minimizing unclear, ambiguous, or confusing results. While screening tests are not 100% accurate in all cases, it is generally more valuable to have the screening tests at the appropriate times, as recommended by your healthcare provider, than to not have them at all. However, some screening tests, when used in people not at high risk for disease, or when testing for very rare diseases, can cause more problems than they help.

Some common screening tests

Be sure to consult your healthcare provider regarding the appropriate timing and frequency of all screening tests based on your age, overall health, and medical history. The following are some examples of common screening tests:

Cholesterol measurements

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that can be found in all parts of the body. It aids in the production of cell membranes, some hormones, and vitamin D. The cholesterol in the blood comes from 2 sources: the food you eat and production in your liver. However, the liver produces all of the cholesterol the body needs.

Cholesterol and other fats are transported in the bloodstream in the form of spherical particles, called lipoproteins. The 2 most commonly known lipoproteins are low-density lipoproteins (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), or "good" cholesterol.

Cholesterol screening is performed by a blood test. People with high cholesterol measurements from a blood sample have a higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), than those with cholesterol in the normal range. Studies have shown that people with high cholesterol can reduce their risk for heart disease by lowering their cholesterol. It is important to understand, however, that people can still have heart disease even with cholesterol levels in the normal range.

Fecal occult blood test

Fecal occult blood is detected by microscopic analysis or by chemical tests for hemoglobin (blood) in the stool. People with blood in their stool may have a cancerous growth indicative of colorectal cancer. The test requires collection of 3 stool samples that are examined under the microscope for blood. It is important to understand that when blood is present in a stool sample, it can be due to other noncancerous factors, such as certain medications or foods, gastrointestinal bleeding, or hemorrhoids. Testing is recommended starting at age 50 by many organizations including the American Cancer Society.

Pap test (also called Pap smears)

Pap smears are samples of cells taken from the cervix in women to look for cellular changes indicative of cervical cancer. The Pap smear is an important screening test in sexually active women under the age of 65, to detect cancer at a stage when there are often no symptoms. It is important to understand that a Pap smear may be referred to as "abnormal," but may not mean that a person has cervical cancer. Some organizations also recommend HPV (human papilloma virus) screening in certain populations during the Pap smear.

Prostate specific antigen (PSA)

This blood test measures the prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in the blood. Antigens are any substances that evoke responses from a person's immune system. The prostate specific antigen levels can be elevated in the presence of prostate cancer. However, it is important to understand that other benign prostate conditions may also elevate PSA, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is noncancerous swelling of the prostate. The PSA test is not recommended for all men, and there is considerable controversy over the role of PSA testing. Some organizations, such as the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), now recommend against PSA screening. The pros and cons of PSA screening should always be discussed with your healthcare provider before testing. Some of the cons include unnecessary testing and procedures, unnecessary costs, and significantly increased anxiety.

Mammography

Many organizations, including the USPSTF, recommend mammography screening for breast cancer every 1 year to 2 years after age 50. This test is done in conjunction with a clinical breast exam

Colonoscopy

Many organizations, including the USPSTF, recommend screening for colon cancer or colon polyps at age 50, earlier if you have a family history or other risk factors

Diabetes or prediabetes

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that all adults be screened for diabetes or prediabetes starting at age 45, regardless of weight. Additionally, individuals without symptoms of diabetes should be screened if they are overweight or obese and have one or more additional diabetes risk factors.

Consult your healthcare provider regarding all of these as well as other types of screening tests, based on your medical condition, as not all healthcare providers are in agreement in regard to which screening tests should be done and for which age groups.

1 person found this helpful

Health Screening!

Dt. Archna Gupta 89% (678 ratings)
PG Diploma in Nutrition & Dietetics, M.Sc.in Food & Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Ghaziabad
Health Screening!

HEALTH SCREENING 

ARE YOU UP TO DATE?     

REGULAR HEALTH CHECKS CAN KEEP YOU HEALTHY AND HEAD OFF MAJOR PROBLEMS. READER’S DIGEST HAS THE RUN-DOWN ON THE SCREENING TESTS THAT HELP YOU STAY IN TOP FROM     

AGE

TEST

DESCRIPTION

FREQUENCY

COMMENTS

FROM

2 YRS

DENTAL CHECK-UP

 REGULAR EXAMINATION  BY A DENTIST

EVERY 12 MONTHS

TIMINING VISITS SHOULD BE ASSESSED BY DENTIST ON A CASE –BY-CASE BASIS

FROM SCHOOL AGE

EYE CHECK

THOROUGH OF EYE HEALTH AND VISION BY AN OPHTHALMOLOGIST

EVERY 2 YEARS

CHECKS MAY NEED TO BE MORE OFTEN IF ADVISED BY OPHTHALMOLOGIST

FROM

18 YRS

BLOOD PRESSUR

BP CUFF APPLIED TO ARM BY GP

EVERY 12 MONTH

MORE FREQUENTLY IF YOU HAVE RISKY LIFESTYLE FACTORS OR ARE AT HIGH RISK DUE TO FAMILY HISTORY OF HIGH BP

FROM

 18 YRS

CHOLESTEROL AND LIPIDS

BLOOD TEST ORDERED BY GP

EVERY 12 MONTHS

MORE FREQUENTLY IF YOU HAVE RISK FACTOR AND FAMILY HISTORY OF PREMATURE CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE OR EXISTING DIAGNOSES

FROM ADVENT OF SEXUAL ACTIVITY

CHLAMYDIA

BLOOD TEST ORDERED BY GYNAECOLOGIST/UROLO-GIST

EVERY 1-2 YEARS

GYNAECOLOGIST/UROLOGIST MAY ASK ABOUT SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS

1 person found this helpful

Screening for Prehypertension

Dr. Naresh Kumar Monigari 90% (309 ratings)
MD - General Medicine, MBBS
General Physician, Karimnagar
Screening for Prehypertension

Guidelines for vary from time to time, but generally accepted classification of hypertension ( JNC7)is

Average of two or more properly measured readings at each of two or more visits after an initial screen:

Normal                  < 120 mm Hg SBP             AND   DBP < 90 mm Hg

Prehypertension    120 -139 mm Hg SBP     OR      DBP 80 to 89 mm Hg

Stage 1 HTN            140 -159 mm Hg SBP     OR      DBP 90 to 99 mm Hg

Stage 2 HTN            >/= 160 mm of Hg SBP   OR     DBP >/= 100 mm Hg.

Prevalence of prehypertension among adults in United States is approximately 37 percent.

Study done by Yadhav S et al showed prevalence of prehypetension was 32.3 percent in India with highest  36% among 30-39 yrs age group, indicates that awareness is necessary for regular blood pressure check up.

People diagnosed with hypertension represents “tip  of an iceberg”.

Many patients get to know about their raised blood pressures at the time of diagnosis, heart attack, stroke or kidney disease( end organ failures) which would have been preventable  if treated at an early stage.

Why hypertension should be diagnosed and treated ?

Hypertension currently causes  2/3rd s of all strokes and half of all cases of ischemic heart disease.

Reduction in high blood pressure leads to large reduction in stroke, heart failure, renal failure, aortic dissection, coronary events and death.

Prehypertension: It is an entity where SBP >120 -139 mm Hg or DBP 80-89 mm Hg.

Multiple epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cardiovascular risk in patients with prehypertension.People with prehypertension have increased risk of progression to sustained hypertension, the prevalence of hypertension increases from approximately 10 percent at age of 30 yrs to as high as 90 percent after age of 65 yrs.

Framinham hypertension risk prediction score, may help identification of prehypertensive patients who are at gretest risk for pregression to hypertension. Risk calculator includes variables like age, sex, family history of hypertension, body mass index and smoking.  Most important predictors of these were higher baseline blood pressure and older age.

Screening for hypertension: optimal interval for screening is not known.

2007 USPSTF( United States Preventive Services Task Force) guidelines recommend

Screening every    two years for persons with SBP <120 mm Hg and DBP < 80 mm Hg     

                                 Yearly for persons with SBP 120-139 mm Hg or a DBP 80 -89 mm Hg

How to manage Prehypertension:

TROPHY stydy( TRial Of preventing Hypertension)  results showed that there is no role for pharmacotherapy in prehypertension except in special conditions like diabetes, chronic kidney disease etc.

Treatment:As per JNC 7 reccomendations patients with prehypertension who do not have diabetes, chronic kidney disease , end organ damage , or clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease are generally treated with non pharmacological therapies.

Major non pharmacological therapies that aid to decrease blood pressure are: 

Weight reduction:  Maintain normal body weight ( BMI 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2)  this can reduce BP by 5 to 20 mm hg per 10kg weight loss.

Adopt DASH eating plan : (DASH- Dietary Approach To Stop Hypertension) consists of fruits, vegetables, legumes, low-fat dairy products with reduced saturated and total fat.This can reduce BP by 8 to 14 mm Hg.

Dietary sodium Restriction: Reduce dietary sodium intake to no more than 100meq/day(2.4 gm sodium or 6 gm of sodium chloride). This can reduce BP by 2 to 8 mm Hg.

Physical activity: Engage in a regular aerobic physical activity such as brisk walking (at least 30 min per day, most days of the week). This can reduce BP by 4 to 9 mm Hg.

Moderation of alcohol: Limit consumption of alcohol to no more than 2 drinks per day in most men and no more than 1 drink in women and lighter weight persons. This can reduce BP by 2 to 4 mm Hg.

2 people found this helpful

First Trimester Screening - Why Is It Necessary?

Dr. Sumati Saxena 90% (19 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Allahabad
First Trimester Screening - Why Is It Necessary?

A healthy pregnancy is one where the mother and the child both enjoys good physical and mental health. While all parents wish their child to be in the pink of health, incidences of birth-defects are on the rise. This makes the screening tests, especially during the first trimester, very important. These tests play a significant role in determining the well-being of a pregnant woman and also in the diagnosis of any abnormalities, especially chromosomal or genetic aberrations that can give rise to a host of problems including Trisomy 18 or Down Syndrome in the baby. In this article, we will discuss some of the first-trimester screening tests and their significance.

The screening tests involve a series of blood tests (maternal blood) and ultrasound scans to monitor the movement and development of the fetus.

  1. Maternal blood tests: The proteins PAPP-A (pregnancy-associated plasma protein A) and Free ß-HCG (free-beta human chorionic gonadotropin protein) are produced during the early stages of pregnancy by the placenta. These proteins play a pivotal role in ensuring the well being of the fetus and should ideally be present in a slightly elevated level. A maternal blood test showing a low concentration of PAPP-A and free ß-HCG is often indicative of chromosomal abnormalities or genetic defects in the baby.
  2. Nuchal translucency screening test: A characteristic symptom of Down Syndrome is an increased thickness, especially at the back of the neck. In Nuchal translucency screening (during the first trimester), an ultrasound of the back of the fetal neck is done to check its thickness and also to look for any unwanted accumulation of fluids, both of which contributes significantly in the diagnosis of Down Syndrome.
  3. In some incidences, there may be a combined first-trimester screening (an amalgamation of Nuchal translucency screening and maternal blood tests). The probability of the baby suffering from the chromosomal aberrations such as Down Syndrome, Trisomy 13, can be more precisely determined by the combined screening.

In case the individual or the combined screening tests indicate some abnormalities, few other tests may be carried out such as

  1. Amniocentesis: The test involves collecting a sample of the amniotic fluid (the fluid present inside the amniotic sac and acts as a protective shield for the fetus ensuring healthy fetal development) and examining the cells present in it for chromosomal defects (number as well as structure). Amniocentesis is normally carried out between the 15th-20th week of pregnancy.
  2. Chorionic Villus Sampling: Like Amniocentesis, Chorionic Villus Sampling is also a prenatal diagnostic test that plays an instrumental role in the evaluation of the fetal karyotype that goes a long way in the diagnosis of chromosomal and genetic disorders.

Benefits of First-trimester Screening
The screening tests during the first-trimester comes as a blessing, especially under the following situations

  1. Either of the partners is a carrier of the Down-syndrome (or similar genetic disorder) gene.
  2. You already have a child with a genetic or chromosomal disorder.
  3. Women having a late pregnancy (35 years or more).
2660 people found this helpful

Cancer Screening - Why, In Whom, When? And How?

Oncologist, Panchkula
Cancer Screening - Why, In Whom, When? And How?

WHY ? CANCER SCREENING- Checking for cancer in people who have no symptoms is cancer screening .Can help doctors find and treat several type of cancers early, before they cause symptoms. Early detection is important because when abnormal tissue or cancer is found early, it may be easier to treat .By the time symptoms appear, cancer may have begun to spread and be harder to treat.

In Whom? - In Diseases where following principles can be followed like Disease should be important health problem in terms of frequency .Natural history of disease presents window of opportunity for early detection. Effective treatment should be available that favorably alters natural  history of disease. Treatment should be more effective if  initiated earlier than during the  symptomatic  stage .Suitable screening test - Cheap/Easily Available/Reproducible/Socially Acceptable

Caution!! Easier Said than Done due to False positive results  - anxiety /unwanted additional tests False negative results - false reassurance, leading to delays in diagnosis

Over-diagnosis - cancer detected was slow growing and would not have harmed that person in his or her lifetime

Some screening tests may cause bleeding or other health problems – Sigmoidoscopy/Colonoscopy Cost burden on healthcare/ Radiation Exposure  of  some tests / Incidental Lesions

When? & How? - In cancers like Breast,Prostate,Colon and Cervix 

 

1 person found this helpful

Importance of Pre-natal screening

Dr. Aradhana Aggarwal 90% (57 ratings)
MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Fellowship in Fetal Medicine
Gynaecologist, Amritsar
Importance of Pre-natal screening

More than 90% of pregnancies continue towards a healthy outcome. However, to have a normal pregnancy one must have a retrospective diagnosis for the same and this invariably may be associated with multiple questions from both the parents and close family members. Hence pre-natal screening in several forms allows early prediction of possible problems which may or may not be genetic/inherited. Cases are thus segregated as either high risk or low risk pregnancies and with the aid of specialized FMF- UK accredited softwares we are able to offer the  surveillance required on an individual basis. 

Maintained international standards of fetal care.

First trimester screening is a combination of fetal ultrasound and maternal blood tests. The ultrasound is done between 11- 13 +6 weeks and is performed by a FMF accredited operator. The blood test is performed on FMF approved bio-chemical assay systems and measures two hormones, beta- HCG and PAPP-A. 

The combination of the nuchal translucency and the blood test is known as the combined first trimester screening test which has a 93-95% sensitivity in predicting the risk of chromosomal abnormalities, the most common of which is Down syndrome.

A specific set of guidelines has been formulated for performing the nuchal translucency , cervical, anomaly and fetal well being scans including fetal Dopplers. A scan done as per guidelines helps calculate the risks for aneuploidies (chromosomal abnormalities) and prognosticate the pregnancy for the risk of pre-eclampsia and/or pre-term labour in order to continue a stress free pregnancy both for the mother and near and dear ones!

The need for a CVS or an Amniocentesis

The results of the first trimester combined screening test are available in a weeks time. It provides us with the risks (probability) for the fetus having any chromosomal abnormality. As per guideline, an invasive prenatal test in the form of CVS (chorionic villous sampling) 10-12 weeks or amniocentesis , beyond 16 weeks is offered as a diagnostic test if the risks are higher than 1 in 150. Though these tests carry a risk of miscarriage , 0.5-1%, they are 100% diagnostic for certain chromosomal abnormalities. It is for you to decide whether or not the risk of having a chromosomal abnormality is high enough to warrant having an invasive test. 

 

 

4 people found this helpful

Men and Heart Disease- International Men's Health

Paras Hospitals 92% (28 ratings)
Partners in Health
Multi Speciality, Gurgaon
Men and Heart Disease- International Men's Health

Various studies and researches have been able to prove that women outlive men. In fact they are expected to live at least 7 years more than men. More men are living with and dying of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) than women and have more hospital discharges for Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CHD. The prevalence of CHD is higher in men within each age stratum until after 75 years of age, which may contribute to the perception that heart disease is a man's disease.

The classic risk factors for CVD are the same in women and men, but there are gender differences in the prevalence of risk factors. Dr Bernadine Healy first introduced the concept of the Yentl syndrome in 1991, suggesting gender bias in the management of CHD.

HEART DISEASE AND SEX DIFFERENCES

Reasons for Cardiovascular Disease:

There are a number of risk factors that affect the men more than women. The following are few aspects that are reasons for the rising incidences of heart disease in men:

9300 people found this helpful
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