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Bone Spur Tips

Cervical Spondylosis - In Depth Of It!

MD - Bio-Chemistry, MF Homeo (London), DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery), BHMS
Homeopath, Kolkata
Cervical Spondylosis - In Depth Of It!

Cervical Spondylosis

Definition-

  • Cervical spondylosis is a general term for age-related wear and tear affecting the spinal disks in your neck. As the disks dehydrate and shrink, signs of osteoarthritis develop, including bony projections along the edges of bones (bone spurs).
  • Cervical spondylosis is very common and worsens with age. More than 85 percent of people older than age 60 are affected by cervical spondylosis.


Symptoms-

  • For most people, cervical spondylosis causes no symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they typically include pain and stiffness in the neck.
  • Sometimes, cervical spondylosis results in a narrowing of the space needed by the spinal cord and the nerve roots that pass through the spine to the rest of your body. If the spinal cord or nerve roots become pinched, you might experience:
  • Tingling, numbness, and weakness in your arms, hands, legs or feet
  • Lack of coordination and difficulty walking
  • Loss of bladder or bowel contr


Causes-

  • As you age, the bones and cartilage that make up your backbone and neck gradually develop wear and tear. These changes can include:
  • Dehydrated disks. Disks act as cushions between the vertebrae of your spine. By the age of 40, most people's spinal disks begin drying out and shrinking, which allows more bone-on-bone contact between the vertebrae.
  • Herniated disks. Age also affects the exterior of your spinal disks. Cracks often appear, leading to bulging (herniated) disks — which sometimes can press on the spinal cord and nerve roots.
  • Bone spurs. Disk degeneration often results in the spine producing extra amounts of bone in a misguided effort to strengthen the spine. These bone spurs can sometimes pinch the spinal cord and nerve roots.
  • Stiff ligaments. Ligaments are cords of tissue that connect bone to bone. Spinal ligaments can stiffen with age, making your neckless flexible.


Risk factors-

  • Risk factors for cervical spondylosis include:
  • Age. Cervical spondylosis is a normal part of aging.
  • Occupation. Jobs that involve repetitive neck motions, awkward positioning or a lot of overhead work put extra stress on your neck.
  • Neck injuries. Previous neck injuries appear to increase the risk of cervical spondylosis.
  • Genetic factors. Some individuals in certain families will experience more of these changes over time, while others will not.
  • Smoking. Smoking has been linked to increased neck pain.


Complications-

If your spinal cord or nerve roots become severely compressed as a result of cervical spondylosis, the damage can be permanent.

Homeopathic remedies for cervical spondylosis-

  • Conium
  • Kalmia
  • Gelsemium
  • Kali carb
  • Rhustox
  • Ruta
  • Bellis perennis

Heel Bone Spurs - Non Surgical Treatment That Can Be Of Help!

DNB - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Heel Bone Spurs - Non Surgical Treatment That Can Be Of Help!

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder


Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks.

Know The Reasons Behind Heel Bone Spurs!

Dr. Prince Gupta 86% (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Gurgaon
Know The Reasons Behind Heel Bone Spurs!

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder


Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks.

2441 people found this helpful

Heel Spurs - 7 Ways That Can Help!

MBBS, Diploma In Orthopaedics, DNB (Orthopedics), MBA (HCA)
Orthopedist, Delhi
Heel Spurs - 7 Ways That Can Help!

For some people, the simple act of walking can be very uncomfortable. This is because they may be suffering from a heel spur. Heel spurs are calcium deposits that cause a bony protrusion on the underside of the heel bone. Heel spurs themselves may be painless but walking or jogging can make the person like a knife or pin is sticking into his or her sole. This may also be felt while standing up after being seated for a long time. Heel spurs do not heal on resting and usually need medical attention. Some ways of treating a heel spur are-

  1. Stretching Exercises: Heel spur exercises help strengthen the tissue in the heel and increases the fascia and Achilles tendon flexibility. This, in turn, helps reduce the pain and prevents a recurrence of the condition. Try standing with both feet apart and flex your knees while squatting. Keep your heels on the ground for as long as possible.

  2. Wearing The Right Shoes: Wearing shoes that do not fit well is one of the leading causes for heel spurs. When buying shoes look for a firm heel counter, a ¾-1 1/2 inch heel, a long vamp, semi-rigid or rigid shank and a toe box that is wide enough to accommodate your toes without pinching them.

  3. Taping or Strapping to Rest Stressed Muscles and Tendons: Taping or strapping your foot tightly can help protect the fascia and allow the spur to heal. It also rests the muscles and tendons and distributes the pressure being put on them.

  4. Shoe Inserts or Orthotic Devices: Using an insole can help cushion the heel and reduce the pain of a heel spur. It also reduces the impact felt while walking or standing.

  5. Physical Therapy: Physiotherapy for heel spurs aims at strengthening the foot and calf muscles. Your doctor will try and gradually increase the possible range of motion and restore muscle control in the foot arch. You will also be taught how to improve your running and landing techniques.

  6. Medication: Over the counter medication like ibuprofen may help temporarily ease the pain caused by heel spurs. In some cases, corticosteroid injections may also be prescribed to reduce the inflammation and pain.

  7. Surgery: If there is no improvement in a heel spur within 9 to 12 months, surgery may be considered to remove the spur or release the plantar fascia. However, this is rare and most heel spurs do not need surgery.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2375 people found this helpful

Heel Bone Spurs - Surgical Treatment For Managing It!

MBBS, DNB (Orthopedics)
Orthopedist, Navi Mumbai
Heel Bone Spurs - Surgical Treatment For Managing It!

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder


Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks.

4010 people found this helpful

Heel Bone Spurs - How Surgical Treatment Can Be Of Risk?

MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Coimbatore
Heel Bone Spurs - How Surgical Treatment Can Be Of Risk?

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder

Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2326 people found this helpful

Heel Spurs - 7 Ways To Treat Them!

Dr. Umesh Jain 91% (627 ratings)
DNB Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Kolhapur
Heel Spurs - 7 Ways To Treat Them!

For some people, the simple act of walking can be very uncomfortable. This is because they may be suffering from a heel spur. Heel spurs are calcium deposits that cause a bony protrusion on the underside of the heel bone. Heel spurs themselves may be painless but walking or jogging can make the person like a knife or pin is sticking into his or her sole. This may also be felt while standing up after being seated for a long time. Heel spurs do not heal on resting and usually need medical attention. Some ways of treating a heel spur are-

  1. Stretching Exercises: Heel spur exercises help strengthen the tissue in the heel and increases the fascia and Achilles tendon flexibility. This, in turn, helps reduce the pain and prevents a recurrence of the condition. Try standing with both feet apart and flex your knees while squatting. Keep your heels on the ground for as long as possible.

  2. Wearing The Right Shoes: Wearing shoes that do not fit well is one of the leading causes for heel spurs. When buying shoes look for a firm heel counter, a ¾-1 1/2 inch heel, a long vamp, semi-rigid or rigid shank and a toe box that is wide enough to accommodate your toes without pinching them.

  3. Taping or Strapping to Rest Stressed Muscles and Tendons: Taping or strapping your foot tightly can help protect the fascia and allow the spur to heal. It also rests the muscles and tendons and distributes the pressure being put on them.

  4. Shoe Inserts or Orthotic Devices: Using an insole can help cushion the heel and reduce the pain of a heel spur. It also reduces the impact felt while walking or standing.

  5. Physical Therapy: Physiotherapy for heel spurs aims at strengthening the foot and calf muscles. Your doctor will try and gradually increase the possible range of motion and restore muscle control in the foot arch. You will also be taught how to improve your running and landing techniques.

  6. Medication: Over the counter medication like ibuprofen may help temporarily ease the pain caused by heel spurs. In some cases, corticosteroid injections may also be prescribed to reduce the inflammation and pain.

  7. Surgery: If there is no improvement in a heel spur within 9 to 12 months, surgery may be considered to remove the spur or release the plantar fascia. However, this is rare and most heel spurs do not need surgery.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3773 people found this helpful

Heel Spurs - How To Get Rid Of Them?

AO TRAUMA, DNB (Orthopedics), MS Ortho, MBBS
Orthopedist, Ghaziabad
Heel Spurs - How To Get Rid Of Them?

For some people, the simple act of walking can be very uncomfortable. This is because they may be suffering from a heel spur. Heel spurs are calcium deposits that cause a bony protrusion on the underside of the heel bone. Heel spurs themselves may be painless but walking or jogging can make the person like a knife or pin is sticking into his or her sole. This may also be felt while standing up after being seated for a long time. Heel spurs do not heal on resting and usually need medical attention. Some ways of treating a heel spur are-

  1. Stretching Exercises: Heel spur exercises help strengthen the tissue in the heel and increases the fascia and Achilles tendon flexibility. This, in turn, helps reduce the pain and prevents a recurrence of the condition. Try standing with both feet apart and flex your knees while squatting. Keep your heels on the ground for as long as possible.

  2. Wearing The Right Shoes: Wearing shoes that do not fit well is one of the leading causes for heel spurs. When buying shoes look for a firm heel counter, a ¾-1 1/2 inch heel, a long vamp, semi-rigid or rigid shank and a toe box that is wide enough to accommodate your toes without pinching them.

  3. Taping or Strapping to Rest Stressed Muscles and Tendons: Taping or strapping your foot tightly can help protect the fascia and allow the spur to heal. It also rests the muscles and tendons and distributes the pressure being put on them.

  4. Shoe Inserts or Orthotic Devices: Using an insole can help cushion the heel and reduce the pain of a heel spur. It also reduces the impact felt while walking or standing.

  5. Physical Therapy: Physiotherapy for heel spurs aims at strengthening the foot and calf muscles. Your doctor will try and gradually increase the possible range of motion and restore muscle control in the foot arch. You will also be taught how to improve your running and landing techniques.

  6. Medication: Over the counter medication like ibuprofen may help temporarily ease the pain caused by heel spurs. In some cases, corticosteroid injections may also be prescribed to reduce the inflammation and pain.

  7. Surgery: If there is no improvement in a heel spur within 9 to 12 months, surgery may be considered to remove the spur or release the plantar fascia. However, this is rare and most heel spurs do not need surgery.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions! In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2859 people found this helpful

Heel Bone Spurs - Understanding The Risks Associated With Them!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship In Arthroscopy & Sports Injury
Orthopedist, Bangalore
Heel Bone Spurs - Understanding The Risks Associated With Them!

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder

Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2425 people found this helpful

8 Risk Associated With Heel Bone Spurs!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
8 Risk Associated With Heel Bone Spurs!

Heel bone spur is a form of calcium deposit that causes a bony protrusion under the heel bone. An X-ray can reveal up to a half inch elongation under the hill. Without image report, this condition is commonly known as heel spur syndrome. Heel spurs are mostly painless but reports of pain in not uncommon. They are often related to plantar fasciitis. The latter is an inflammation of the connective tissue that stretches through the foot bottom connecting the heel bone and the football.

What causes heel spurs?
Heel spurs are a result of prolonged calcium deposit. This condition can result from the heavy strain on the muscle of the foot and ligament, stretching of fascia and wear and tear of the heel bone membrane. These injuries are frequently observed among athletes who are involved with activities such as jumping and running. 

What are the risk factors?
1. Walking abnormalities that involve putting more than normal stress on the bone, nerve and ligament in and around the heel.
2. Running on surfaces that are hard in nature
3. Shoes lacking arch support
4. More than normal body weight 
5. Spending too much time on the feet
6. Too flat or too high arches
7. A person suffering from diabetes
8. In case the protective pad of the heel is fading away due to old age or other bone disorder


Non-Surgical treatment
Unlike common belief, only rest may not be the best way to treat heel bone spurs. On the contrary, a patient might feel sharp pain immediately after sleep. This happens when he tries to walk and the plantar fascia elongates all of a sudden. The pain decreases with more walking. Some treatment methods that work for 90 percent of the sufferers includes wearing the right shoe, stretching exercises, wearing orthotic devices inside the shoes and physical therapy. Over the counter medicine such as Aleve, Tylenol and Advil can be consumed to reduce the pain and for improving the overall condition. Corticosteroid injection also tends to give relief from the inflammation.

Surgical treatment
If heel spurs persist for more than 8-9 months, surgical options should be explored by the patient. There are two angles on which a doctor works, either removing the spur or release the plantar fascia. Pre-surgical exams are necessary to ensure that a person is eligible for surgery and all non-surgical avenues are explored. Post-surgical activities are equally important for the process of healing. Usage of bandages, crutches, splints and surgical shoes is a mandate to avoid complications such as infection, numbness, and scarring. Possible side effects should be discussed with the surgeon well before the surgery. The estimated healing time from this procedure is close to 8-12 weeks.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4407 people found this helpful
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