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Dr. Neelu Desai

Neurologist, Thane

Dr. Neelu Desai Neurologist, Thane
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I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Neelu Desai
Dr. Neelu Desai is one of the best Neurologists in Kaushalya Medical Foundation Trust Hospital, Thane. She is currently practising at Dr. Neelu Desai@Jupiter Hospital in Kaushalya Medical Foundation Trust Hospital, Thane. Book an appointment online with Dr. Neelu Desai on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Neurologists online in Thane. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Cadbury Junction, Eastern Express Highway, Service Road Landmark : Next To Viviana MallThane Get Directions
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I have my nerves seen in my hands too big and I too have the shaking problem of my hands everyday and my nerves are like coming out like very bigger. Please someone help me on this. Thank you.

MBBS
General Physician, Chennai
The nerves you call are veins looks like you no fat in your hands so they are exposed tremors of the hand needs detailed discussion.
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Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

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My hand shivers slightly when I leave it free in air without any support. What is the cause and remedy to get rid of it?

MBBS, cc USG
General Physician, Gurgaon
This may be due to 1. Severe anxiety 2. Medical problem like Thyroid disorder get your following test done and review with reports 1. CBC 2. Thyroid function test(fasting)
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Hi I had fallen from staircase and suffered head injury on 30 Jan 2005, I was in sense and my left eye surrounding was black for around two months, even I don't remember events between 30 Jan - 08 Feb2005. I was treated by a neurologist I recovered from that head injury. But after sometimes I felt I lost my smelling sense. And I am hypertensive taking losartan 25 mg twice in a day. Can my lost smelling sense be cured?

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
In most cases a trial of steroids is appropriate (prednisolone by mouth) but beyond this there are a range of simple, medical and surgical treatment options depending on the cause and the perceived severity.
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Some times while doing work my hands get shivers, help me out by best recommendations & reason for so.

Doctor of Homeopathic Medicine (H.M.D.)
Homeopath, Belgaum
Considering your age it can be anticipatory anxiety to do specific work or if it is happening always than you need to undergo neurological examination to fine the cause and think of treatment.
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I usually take 5mg clonazepam tab but today I take 10mg is that any problem can create?

MBBS
General Physician, Kolar
Can you please give more details as to four what you're talking clonazepam. It is usually not advisable to increase dosages of such drugs like clonazepam as they have an impact on your brain. Whether you're taking it for seizures or as an anti-anxiety drug you should never alter the dose without your doctors advice. Please consult your doctor who prescribed the medicine. If it is a single isolated incident I guess it's all right. But my sincere request and advice to you is to not repeat it.
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Sir I cannot standing upon my two legs which are handicapped and also my mind also upsset. .

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Get your vital parameters of the body checked from a nearby doctor and revert back with findings and also start with Tablet folvite 5mg once a day for six months and tablet vitamin D3 60000iu once a week for six months
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My wife age 68 years undergone neurosurgery in 2007 for brain tumor. Slowly slowly she loosing physical existence and even can not grip pen for her signature. She is diabetic also. She is suffering from urine incontinence since last one year. She is using catheter since last six months as she can not control urination. Please advise continuation use of catheter may be harmful and may create some other problem in bladder or otherwise. Alsoplease/suggest/any/treatment/for/her/to/control/urine/incontinuation/at/this/stageoo.

MSc
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Chandigarh
There are several means to gain control over your diabetes. Few of them as below: 1. Eating at regular intervals 2. Avoiding foods high in processed and invisible sugar 3. Good sleep hygiene 4. Consistent workouts to be able to give you specific guidelines, we would need to gain a deeper insight into your lifestyle and work with you in greater proximity. Do let me know if you're keen and we could take this prospect forward. Meanwhile, feel free to consult me privately.
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I am a 30 year old female. Unmarried . A school teacher . From last two years I m suffering from migraine. Day by day it is becoming severe. Atleast twice in a week I got attack of migraine. I am using vasograin and naxdom tablets. Bt it is not getting cured. Please suggest me.

Master of Hospital Administration, DTM&H, MBBS
General Physician, Kolkata
MIGRAINE IS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH OTHER SYMPTOMS,SO NEED THE HISTORY TO BE ELABORATED IN PERSON &THEN I CAN ADVICE THE REMEDY BESIDES THAT WHAT YOU HAVE TAKEN
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Just to give you a brief background, my father is 72 years old and a diabetic and has Hepatitis C and previously suffered a Diabetic stroke 2 years and had resultant some brain damage from which he made an almost full recovery. He was hospitalized then for a about 2 months and he could recollect all before and after the hospital stay. Recently it was identified that he has some blood clots in his brain and a clot removal surgery was recommended by the local doctors who referred us to another hospital in a another city. The neurosurgeons there have advised that as it currently stands the surgery poses a high risk of post surgery hemorrhage and to compound the problem, he is now highly anaemic. The doctors have advised that he undertakes treatment with clot dissolving medication for a few weeks and then check response to before we go in for surgery due to the risk factors. My father is experiencing intermittent loss of coordination and feeling numb on one side arm and leg which lasts for sometime and then he normalizes. Please could you kindly advise what our next course of action should be. We would highly value your thoughts on this and recommendations. An urgently reply would be greatly appreciated.

BHMS
Homeopath,
Dear lybrate-user, the clot which is present in your father's brain is responsible for the sudden numbness & loss of co-ordination of one side. Due to clot the blood supply to a certain part of brain is being ceased as a result the numbness is occuring. However, this ceasation of blood flow does not last for a long time & the blood flow agains starts within a short period. As a result your father normalizes after some time. Along with the medicines which your father are taking you can also give him homoeopathic mother tincture gingko bilova q, 30 drops, thrice daily, after meals, in a cup of water.
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My husband is 34 years now and was operated for brain tumor (right side) on dec 2013. He was disabled on left arm and left leg. Now has regained shoulder movement and left leg movement partially. Left arm fingers can be closed but he is unable to open them or use for any activity. He continues his physio and ergo therapy. How far will his healing take and how much of his movement be regained. Thanks in advance for your response.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), PG Dip Panchakarma, PG Dip Ksharsutra for piles,pilonidal sinus and fistula management , Post Graduate Diploma In Hospital Administration (PGDHA), Certificate in Diabetes update
Ayurveda, Navi Mumbai
Thanks for expecting Healthier fitness solutions with Ayurved, trust self n have faith on ur Dr, its great u dealt powerfully. Continue physiotherapy n share ur concern with surgeon who operated. Simple things like pichu, abhyanham, Nasyam Therapy sos Basti therapy will add pace to ur recovery
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Sir, I want to know what is the precautions to get way from paralyzed it's for old person.

MBBS
General Physician, Chandigarh
If the person is already paralysed then you need to take the help of a physiotherapist to restore the mobilisation of body functions as far as possible.
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The patient is suffering from migraine. Will taking chocolates have good or bad impact on her health?

BHMS
Homeopath, Thane
Hi, Chocolates are the triggering factors for migraines.So please avoid the intake of chocolates till the treatment is going on.
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I am 40 years old and having migraine since 30 years . Nowadays my sensitivity towards migraine has become more, I am experiencing extreme giddiness, like in fainting, while in sleeping posture. I fell in the bathroom and lost consciousness suddenly during a migraine attack once. My husband brought me outside and he observed that I was neither speaking or was responding to his speech. He said that all I did was kept staring. Then I became normal after 5 minutes and did not remember anything which happened after I lost my consciousness. And recently after a headache I came across a very unusual and very new kind of experience while asleep. I was sleeping and suddenly one side of my whole body became numb. I could not speak anything nor could I move any part of my body and could do nothing to call for help. This condition lasted for 10 to 15 seconds of time. Then it became normal and I fell asleep. It was normal after I woke up also but the migraine headache persisted.

MBBS
General Physician,
I suggest you to test yourself by following stand in a relax position with both lower limbs one ft apart, spread upper limbs in the front, now close your eyes for 10 seconds. Let me know what is your experience. We will move forward to the treatment then. And for your migraine,, search for the triggering factor and avoid. Find out relieving things and use. E. G. When you start to have the episode, drink strong coffee and observe whether it improves or worsens. We can have good control over it with some medications, do come for follow up. Regards.
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She was in paralysis condition since seven month. Improve very slowly what I give her to eat for her fast recovery?

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Neurology
Neurologist, Hyderabad
You can give her high protein diet, such as fish, chicken, eggs. Also milk and dry fruits. Continue physiotherapy.
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Hello doctor, my father is having diabetes, hypertension and insomnia. He is taking pregeb m, clonazepam,impramine, glinam M and amlip AT regularly. BT we r worried about the complications of these conditions and side effects of these drugs. He also feel so much loneliness. What precautions we should take to protect him from complications. That can occur in future. please suggest something to maintain his health on primary stage only. And he also have fungal infection on his lips.

PhD, Human Energy Fields, Diploma in PIP, EFI, Aura scanning for Health evaluation; Energy field assessment, Fellowship Cardiac Rehabilitation, Cardiac Rehabilitation, MD (Ayur - Mind Body Med), Mind Body Medicine
Non-Invasive Conservative Cardiac Care Specialist, Pune
Dear lybrate-user A few suggestions to help your Father feel better. Apply turmeric in ghee on lips to keep them soft and clear the infection in natural way. Add coconut oil in his diet. About 2 big spoons. This will help reduce the heat caused from meds. Help soften bowel movement and also keep his digestion proper. Make sure he has every opportunity to interact with other people his age and walk as much as he can. Keeping the mind engaged will help his health at all levels. Regulate his diet such that he had adequate vegetables and fruit. Usually older people eat only rice or soft carbs and this is not enough. Replace all wheat foods with jowari or other mullets of your choice. This will improve health (for every body) in a great way. Regards.
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What are the symptoms of brain tumour and how will you take care of brain tumour?

MCh, MS , MBBS
Neurosurgeon, Mumbai
There are various tyoes of brain tumors. Patient can have headache (specially early morning headache) with vomitings, fits, limb weakness, visual disturbances. Symptoms will depends on the size and location of brain tumor.
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I am 32 years old n suffering with seizure from last 1 yr. I am taking my medicines regularly then to I got back y so?

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
Getting seizures frequently is called epilepsy. It is tarted with either a single or combination of antiepileptics doe ending upon the severity, frequency of fits, tolerability of person, eeg reports and seizure free intervals. If you had seizure even while on medications that means you either do not have required drug levels of the medicine or may need higher doses/ or addition of new medication. For a complete investigation and appropriate management consult your treating physician. Consult for any further queries regarding the disease or treatment.
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