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Gum Disease And Bone Loss

Hi Sir, My age of 25 years. I have gum disease and tooth loss and loss. Doctor recommended flap surgery. I am afraid. What is the best treatment of total cure treatment? Please tell me, sir.

Hi Sir, My age of 25 years. I have gum disease and tooth loss and loss. Doctor recommended flap surgery. I am afraid....
Hi if you have an issue of gum disease and tooth loss you should get an opg (full mouth xray) done. After that only you should get flap surgery done along with bone grafting as only flap surgery will not help.
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Please suggest symptoms of pyaria are appearing in my teeth so what precautions should be taken to avoid them.

Please suggest symptoms of pyaria are appearing in my teeth
so what precautions should be taken to avoid them.
bleeding and swollen gums. tartar deposits pale teeth. precautions . brush twice regularly with a standard toothpaste and soft toothbrush. massage gums with stolin gum paint. warm saline rinses couple of times
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Hi, I am a 59-year old suffering from psoriatic arthritis for the last 6 years. There has been severe itching too lately. I take an anti-histamine like Piriton nightly to control itchiness and help me to sleep as well, as recently I also suffer from insomnia. Is it okay for me to take Atarax 25 mg as well nightly? Or should I take 2 tablets Piriton instead?

Hi, I am a 59-year old suffering from psoriatic arthritis for the last 6 years. There has been severe itching too lat...
No cure exists for psoriatic arthritis, so treatment focuses on controlling inflammation in your affected joints to prevent joint pain and disability. Medications Drugs used to treat psoriatic arthritis include: NSAIDs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Over-the-counter NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve). Stronger NSAIDs are available by prescription. Side effects may include stomach irritation, heart problems, and liver and kidney damage. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). These drugs can slow the progression of psoriatic arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage. Common DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall), leflunomide (Arava), and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Side effects vary but may include liver damage, bone marrow suppression and severe lung infections. Immunosuppressants. These medications act to tame your immune system, which is out of control in psoriatic arthritis. Examples include azathioprine (Imuran, Azasan) and cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune). These medications can increase your susceptibility to infection. TNF-alpha inhibitors. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory substance produced by your body. TNF-alpha inhibitors can help reduce pain, morning stiffness, and tender or swollen joints. Examples include etanercept (Enbrel), infliximab (Remicade), adalimumab (Humira), golimumab (Simponi) and certolizumab (Cimzia). Potential side effects include nausea, diarrhea, hair loss and an increased risk of serious infections. Newer medications. Some newly developed medications for plaque psoriasis can also reduce the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. Examples include apremilast (Otezla), ustekinumab (Stelara) and secukinumab (Cosentyx). Surgical and other procedures Steroid injections. This type of medication reduces inflammation quickly and is sometimes injected into an affected joint. Joint replacement surgery. Joints that have been severely damaged by psoriatic arthritis can be replaced with artificial prostheses made of metal and plastic.
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What are the side effects of smoking? As it causes cancer what type of cancer it may cause? Is it curable for such th8ngs from the primary stage? What should I do for quit smoking?

Overview Cigarette smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causes many diseases, and reduces the health of smokers in general. 1, 2 Quitting smoking lowers your risk for smoking-related diseases and can add years to your life. 1, 2 Smoking and Death Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. 1 •Cigarette smoking causes more than 480, 000 deaths each year in the United States. This is nearly one in five deaths. 1, 2, 3 •Smoking causes more deaths each year than the following causes combined: 4 oHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) OIllegal drug use OAlcohol use OMotor vehicle injuries OFirearm-related incidents •More than 10 times as many you. S. Citizens have died prematurely from cigarette smoking than have died in all the wars fought by the United States during its history. 1 •Smoking causes about 90% (or 9 out of 10) of all lung cancer deaths in men and women. 1, 2 More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer. 5 •About 80% (or 8 out of 10) of all deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are caused by smoking. 1 •Cigarette smoking increases risk for death from all causes in men and women. 1 •The risk of dying from cigarette smoking has increased over the last 50 years in men and women in the United States. 1 Smoking and Increased Health Risks Smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to develop heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer. 1 •Smoking is estimated to increase the risk— oFor coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times1, 6 OFor stroke by 2 to 4 times1 OOf men developing lung cancer by 25 times1 OOf women developing lung cancer by 25.7 times1 •Smoking causes diminished overall health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost. 1 Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease Smokers are at greater risk for diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease). •Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease, which are among the leading causes of death in the United States. 1, 3 •Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease. 1 •Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower. This makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up. Clots can also form. 1, 2 •A stroke occurs when a clot blocks the blood flow to part of your brain or when a blood vessel in or around your brain bursts. 1, 2 •Blockages caused by smoking can also reduce blood flow to your legs and skin. 1, 2 Smoking and Respiratory Disease Smoking can cause lung disease by damaging your airways and the small air sacs (alveoli) found in your lungs. 1, 2 •Lung diseases caused by smoking include COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. 1, 2 •Cigarette smoking causes most cases of lung cancer. 1, 2 •If you have asthma, tobacco smoke can trigger an attack or make an attack worse. 1, 2 •Smokers are 12 to 13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers. 1 Smoking and Cancer Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body: 1, 2 (See figure above) •Bladder •Blood (acute myeloid leukemia) •Cervix •Colon and rectum (colorectal) •Esophagus •Kidney and ureter •Larynx •Liver •Oropharynx (includes parts of the throat, tongue, soft palate, and the tonsils) •Pancreas •Stomach •Trachea, bronchus, and lung Smoking also increases the risk of dying from cancer and other diseases in cancer patients and survivors. 1 If nobody smoked, one of every three cancer deaths in the United States would not happen. 1, 2 Smoking and Other Health Risks Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and affects a person’s overall health. 1, 2 •Smoking can make it harder for a woman to become pregnant and can affect her baby's health before and after birth. Smoking increases risks for: 1, 2, 5 oPreterm (early) delivery OStillbirth (death of the baby before birth) OLow birth weight OSudden infant death syndrome (known as SIDS or crib death) OEctopic pregnancy OOrofacial clefts in infants •Smoking can also affect men's sperm, which can reduce fertility and also increase risks for birth defects and miscarriage. 2 •Smoking can affect bone health. 1, 5 oWomen past childbearing years who smoke have weaker bones than women who never smoked, and are at greater risk for broken bones. •Smoking affects the health of your teeth and gums and can cause tooth loss. 1 •Smoking can increase your risk for cataracts (clouding of the eye’s lens that makes it hard for you to see) and age-related macular degeneration (damage to a small spot near the center of the retina, the part of the eye needed for central vision. 1 •Smoking is a cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus and can make it harder to control. The risk of developing diabetes is 30–40% higher for active smokers than nonsmokers. 1, 2 •Smoking causes general adverse effects on the body, including inflammation and decreased immune function. 1 •Smoking is a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. 1 Quitting and Reduced Risks •Quitting smoking cuts cardiovascular risks. Just 1 year after quitting smoking, your risk for a heart attack drops sharply. 2 •Within 2 to 5 years after quitting smoking, your risk for stroke could fall to about the same as a nonsmoker’s. 2 •If you quit smoking, your risks for cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder drop by half within 5 years. 2 •Ten years after you.
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What are the symptoms of Dengue and what should we do so that we are safe from it?

What are the symptoms of Dengue and what should we do so that we are safe from it?
Dengue fever it is a virus-caused disease that is spread by the bite of mosquitoes (aedes-aegypti). This is also known as break bone fever. The dengue fever has a sudden onset and symptoms may include: * fever for 3 to 7 days * intense headache and pain behind the eyes * muscle and joint pain * loss of appetite * vomiting and diarrhoea * skin rash * bleeding, usually from the nose or gums.
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I am 36 year old male habitual of smoking atleast two cigarettes a day, kindly tell which vitamins, nutrient will be reduced in my body. What would be consequences of two cigarette smoking on health.

It is not the loss of nutrients or vitamins that is of concern when you smoke. It is that cigarette smoke has at least 7000 chemicals that can cause havoc to your system. If you smoke less, you cause less damage. So all that you are doing is dying slowly. In case your constitution has any precipitating factors, you could hasten the damage. The consequences of cigarette smoking is less if you smoke less but the other conditions may anyway aggravate ill-health. So instead of worrying or calculating the effects, just stop this habit because it is bad, period. Fortunately, almost all the damage by smoking can be reversed, if and when you stop and take measures to lead a healthy life of exercise, diet and rest. It is difficult to quantify the extent of damage but effects could be felt in your stamina, skin wrinkling, lung capacity, heart strain, eye damage, sexual erectile capacity, tooth decay and tartar buildup, foul breath, damage to the celia lining your throat, brain cells, and for some people the early stages of cancer promoting conditions, and a host of other problems. You are advised to stop immediately and abruptly. Check this summary if you are still seriously looking for an excuse to smoke less and feel somewhat justified. Summary: (Source:Center for Disease Control and Prevention) • Cigarette smoking causes more than 480,000 deaths each year in the United States. This is nearly one in five deaths. • More than 10 times as many U.S. citizens have died prematurely from cigarette smoking than have died in all the wars fought by the United States during its history. • Smoking causes about 90% (or 9 out of 10) of all lung cancer deaths in men and women.1,2 More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer. • About 80% (or 8 out of 10) of all deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are caused by smoking. • Cigarette smoking increases risk for death from all causes in men and women. • Smoking is estimated to increase the risk— o For coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times o For stroke by 2 to 4 times o Of men developing lung cancer by 25 times • Of women developing lung cancer by 25.7 times • Smoking causes diminished overall health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost. • Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease. • Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease. • Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower. This makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up. Clots can also form. • Blockages caused by smoking can also reduce blood flow to your legs and skin. • Lung diseases caused by smoking include COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. • Cigarette smoking causes most cases of lung cancer. • If you have asthma, tobacco smoke can trigger an attack or make an attack worse. • Smokers are 12 to 13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers. Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body: • Bladder • Blood (acute myeloid leukemia) • Cervix • Colon and rectum (colorectal) • Esophagus • Kidney and ureter • Larynx • Liver • Oropharynx (includes parts of the throat, tongue, soft palate, and the tonsils) • Pancreas • Stomach • Trachea, bronchus, and lung • Smoking can make it harder for a woman to become pregnant and can affect her baby's health before and after birth. Smoking increases risks for: o Preterm (early) delivery o Stillbirth (death of the baby before birth) o Low birth weight o Sudden infant death syndrome (known as SIDS or crib death) o Ectopic pregnancy o Orofacial clefts in infants • Smoking can also affect men's sperm, which can reduce fertility and also increase risks for birth defects and miscarriage. • Smoking can affect bone health. o Women past childbearing years who smoke have weaker bones than women who never smoked, and are at greater risk for broken bones. • Smoking affects the health of your teeth and gums and can cause tooth loss. • Smoking can increase your risk for cataracts (clouding of the eye’s lens that makes it hard for you to see) and age-related macular degeneration (damage to a small spot near the center of the retina, the part of the eye needed for central vision). • Smoking is a cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus and can make it harder to control. The risk of developing diabetes is 30–40% higher for active smokers than nonsmokers. • Smoking causes general adverse effects on the body, including inflammation and decreased immune function. • Smoking is a cause of rheumatoid arthritis.
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Sir / Madam, I have a habit of smoking, I smoke at least once in a day and the most is four or five times a day, I want to know the effects on my body in the long term, and any measure to avoid smoking.

Summary: (Source:Center for Disease Control and Prevention) • Cigarette smoking causes more than 480,000 deaths each year in the United States. This is nearly one in five deaths. • More than 10 times as many U.S. citizens have died prematurely from cigarette smoking than have died in all the wars fought by the United States during its history. • Smoking causes about 90% (or 9 out of 10) of all lung cancer deaths in men and women.1,2 More women die from lung cancer each year than from breast cancer. • About 80% (or 8 out of 10) of all deaths from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are caused by smoking. • Cigarette smoking increases risk for death from all causes in men and women. • Smoking is estimated to increase the risk— o For coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times o For stroke by 2 to 4 times o Of men developing lung cancer by 25 times • Of women developing lung cancer by 25.7 times • Smoking causes diminished overall health, increased absenteeism from work, and increased health care utilization and cost. • Smoking causes stroke and coronary heart disease. • Even people who smoke fewer than five cigarettes a day can have early signs of cardiovascular disease. • Smoking damages blood vessels and can make them thicken and grow narrower. This makes your heart beat faster and your blood pressure go up. Clots can also form. • Blockages caused by smoking can also reduce blood flow to your legs and skin. • Lung diseases caused by smoking include COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. • Cigarette smoking causes most cases of lung cancer. • If you have asthma, tobacco smoke can trigger an attack or make an attack worse. • Smokers are 12 to 13 times more likely to die from COPD than nonsmokers. Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body: • Bladder • Blood (acute myeloid leukemia) • Cervix • Colon and rectum (colorectal) • Esophagus • Kidney and ureter • Larynx • Liver • Oropharynx (includes parts of the throat, tongue, soft palate, and the tonsils) • Pancreas • Stomach • Trachea, bronchus, and lung • Smoking can make it harder for a woman to become pregnant and can affect her baby's health before and after birth. Smoking increases risks for: o Preterm (early) delivery o Stillbirth (death of the baby before birth) o Low birth weight o Sudden infant death syndrome (known as SIDS or crib death) o Ectopic pregnancy o Orofacial clefts in infants • Smoking can also affect men's sperm, which can reduce fertility and also increase risks for birth defects and miscarriage. • Smoking can affect bone health. o Women past childbearing years who smoke have weaker bones than women who never smoked, and are at greater risk for broken bones. • Smoking affects the health of your teeth and gums and can cause tooth loss. • Smoking can increase your risk for cataracts (clouding of the eye’s lens that makes it hard for you to see) and age-related macular degeneration (damage to a small spot near the center of the retina, the part of the eye needed for central vision). • Smoking is a cause of type 2 diabetes mellitus and can make it harder to control. The risk of developing diabetes is 30–40% higher for active smokers than nonsmokers. • Smoking causes general adverse effects on the body, including inflammation and decreased immune function. • Smoking is a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. Measures to quit smoking: When quitting, you must take one day at a time; though you must give up all smoking at once, and promptly. If you look too far ahead you will get discouraged and will give up. If you sit and count the number of days you have given up, that will also focus too much on achievement. You must focus on the here and now, on that day to be precise. After all quitting is not that easy due to many factors. So even if you fail one day, you must try and try again. Very few people succeed in their first attempt. Your persistence will eventually pay off. The urge to discontinue is hampered by many factors but the worst of them is the conditioning. In fact these conditions can exist all through the day unlike other addictions. But your desire to want to stop is the most important factor. It is important to find out about the ill-effects of smoking to have a reason that alarms you about continuing in the habit. The information is really scary but true and you must remind yourself about this every day. The nicotine in tobacco smoke stimulates the heart beat to raise the blood pressure in no time at all. So you must avoid it like the plague: it is just very bad medicine for you. In fact it is highly toxic too. You will need to stop smoking or consuming any tobacco related items with immediate effect. You should start vigorous exercises, gradually increasing it over a period of time. Do deep breathing exercises every time you feel like smoking (try Yoga), and replace the oral urge with some healthy food substitute to satiate the need. You may also take hard candy or chewing gum. If the urge is too strong, then use nicotine gums and nicotine patches, for a little while until the smoking drive reduces, substantially. You may also join Smokers Anonymous in your city where the support is really extraordinary for like-minded people who are also in the same situation. Keep yourself occupied or engaged with interesting activities during the times when it is most tempting. Keep the company of non-smokers for some time i.e. at least for the first 21 days. Above all announce it to everyone that you have quit smoking. Here’s a piece of very good advice: even if you accidentally/willfully take a cigarette, it is not the end of the world – you can start the cessation all over again. You must persevere with the best support until you defeat this addiction. Counseling is very useful in the initial stages and when temptations are at their highest.
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