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Overview

Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection

Manufacturer: Serum Institute Of India Ltd
Medicine composition: Cetrorelix
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist. It is used in women undergoing fertility treatment. It delays ovulation from taking place before an egg matures and luteinizing hormone surges.

On using Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection you may experience side effects such as pain, redness, swelling, itching at the site of injection, skin rash, difficulty in breathing, hives, chest pain, nausea, diarrhoea, dizziness, rapid weight gain, bloating and vomiting. If you face any of the allergic reactions mentioned above seek medical attention promptly.

Before using this medication notify your doctor if: you are allergic to any of the ingredients contained within Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection, you have allergy towards any foods, medicines or substances, you have kidney problems, you are taking any prescription or non-prescription drugs/ herbal products/ dietary supplements, you are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding a baby.

The dosage for Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection should be ideally prescribed by the doctor based on your medical history, age, weight and current condition. The usual dose in adults for inducing ovulation is about 0.25 mg given subcutaneously on either day 5 or day 6 of stimulation.

female infertility
In addition to its intended effect, Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Is It safe with alcohol?
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Cetrocare 0.25mg injection is highly unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Human and animal studies have shown significant adverse effects on the foetus. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Cetrocare 0.25mg injection is probably unsafe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
There is no interaction between driving and consuming this drug. So dose alteration is not needed.
Does this affect kidney function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Gufic Bioscience Ltd
Alkem Laboratories Ltd
Emcure Pharmaceuticals Ltd
LG Lifesciences
Samarth Life Sciences Pvt Ltd
Serum Institute Of India Ltd
Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Bharat Serums & Vaccines Ltd
Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Cetrorelix, please consult your doctor.
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
What are you using Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection for?
female infertility
How much was the improvement?
Excellent
Average
How long did it take before seeing improvement?
Within a day
How frequently did you take this medicine?
Once a day
How did you take this medicine?
With or without food
What were the side effects of this medicine?
Injection site reaction
Disclaimer: The information produced here is best of our knowledge and experience and we have tried our best to make it as accurate and up-to-date as possible, but we would like to request that it should not be treated as a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Lybrate is a medium to provide our audience with the common information on medicines and does not guarantee its accuracy or exhaustiveness. Even if there is no mention of a warning for any drug or combination, it never means that we are claiming that the drug or combination is safe for consumption without any proper consultation with an expert.

Lybrate does not take responsibility for any aspect of medicines or treatments. If you have any doubts about your medication, we strongly recommend you to see a doctor immediately.

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IVF Protocols For Low Ovarian Reserve / Poor Egg Quality!

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IVF Specialist, Udaipur
IVF Protocols For Low Ovarian Reserve / Poor Egg Quality!

The available eggs in the ovaries at a time are collectively called an ovarian reserve. Low reserve happens when the production of eggs reduces. This affects the chances of pregnancy. The general cause of low reserves can be aging ovaries. In such cases, the ovary may be healthy and functioning even if the reserve is low. Production of eggs lower as a woman ages. A woman starts with 250,00 to 500,000 eggs at puberty and ends up with 1000 eggs at menopause.

Causes:
Low reserves are caused by

  1. Production of eggs decreases: Chromosomal abnormalities like Turner syndrome (lack of two X chromosomes) and genetic anomalies like Fragile X can decrease egg production.
  2. Ovarian tissue damage: Rough torsion, endometriosis triggered ovarian cysts, malignant or benign tumours, surgical removal of ovary or any other part of it, chemotherapy or radiation, pelvic adhesions, immunological problems or high BMI (Body Mass Index) can destroy the ovarian tissues.

IVF Protocols:
If a woman has low ovarian reserves, then she will be put on the either of the following protocols:

  1. Short GnRHa Flare: Gonadotrophin releasing-hormone-agonist (GnRHa) like Lupron, Nafarelin, Synarel or Buserelin is administered. This therapy is initiated at the onset of menstruation. The goal of the treatment is to stimulate the release of the follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) which augments the ovarian follicular growth.
  2. Combined Clomiphene or Gonadotrophin/Letrozole Stimulation: Older women are mostly administered this protocol. But it is strongly advised not to, as this protocol can potentially harm the egg or the embryo.
  3. Mid-follicular GnRH-antagonist protocol: Once the GnRHa-agonist protocol is commenced, the GnRH-antagonist is given several days later. Once the follicles reach the size of 12mm, GnRHa antagonists like Ganirelix, Orgalutran, Cetrotide and Cetrorelix are added. These drugs stop the pituitary from secreting the luteinizing hormone (FSH leads to secretion of this hormone).
  4. Long GnRHa Pituitary Down Regulation Protocol: This is the usual approach to deal with low ovarian reserves.
  5. Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol: This protocol inhibits FSH production. This protocol generally yields good results.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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Low Ovarian Reserves - Which IVF Protocol Should You Follow?

The available eggs in the ovaries at a time are collectively called an ovarian reserve. Low reserve happens when the production of eggs reduces. This affects the chances of pregnancy. The general cause of low reserves can be aging ovaries. In such cases, the ovary may be healthy and functioning even if the reserve is low. Production of eggs lower as a woman ages. A woman starts with 250,00 to 500,000 eggs at puberty and ends up with 1000 eggs at menopause.

Causes:
Low reserves are caused by

  1. Production of eggs decreases: Chromosomal abnormalities like Turner syndrome (lack of two X chromosomes) and genetic anomalies like Fragile X can decrease egg production.
  2. Ovarian tissue damage: Rough torsion, endometriosis triggered ovarian cysts, malignant or benign tumours, surgical removal of ovary or any other part of it, chemotherapy or radiation, pelvic adhesions, immunological problems or high BMI (Body Mass Index) can destroy the ovarian tissues.

IVF Protocols:
If a woman has low ovarian reserves, then she will be put on the either of the following protocols:

  1. Short GnRHa Flare: Gonadotrophin releasing-hormone-agonist (GnRHa) like Lupron, Nafarelin, Synarel or Buserelin is administered. This therapy is initiated at the onset of menstruation. The goal of the treatment is to stimulate the release of the follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) which augments the ovarian follicular growth.
  2. Combined Clomiphene or Gonadotrophin/Letrozole Stimulation: Older women are mostly administered this protocol. But it is strongly advised not to, as this protocol can potentially harm the egg or the embryo.
  3. Mid-follicular GnRH-antagonist protocol: Once the GnRHa-agonist protocol is commenced, the GnRH-antagonist is given several days later. Once the follicles reach the size of 12mm, GnRHa antagonists like Ganirelix, Orgalutran, Cetrotide and Cetrorelix are added. These drugs stop the pituitary from secreting the luteinizing hormone (FSH leads to secretion of this hormone).
  4. Long GnRHa Pituitary Down Regulation Protocol: This is the usual approach to deal with low ovarian reserves.
  5. Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol: This protocol inhibits FSH production. This protocol generally yields good results.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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IVF Protocol - When You Have Low Ovarian Reserve

The available eggs in the ovaries at a time are collectively called an ovarian reserve. Low reserve happens when the production of eggs reduces. This affects the chances of pregnancy. The general cause of low reserves can be aging ovaries. In such cases, the ovary may be healthy and functioning even if the reserve is low. Production of eggs lower as a woman ages. A woman starts with 25,000 to 5,00,000 eggs at puberty and ends up with 1000 eggs at menopause.

Causes:
Low reserves are caused by

  1. Production of eggs decreases: Chromosomal abnormalities like Turner syndrome (lack of two X chromosomes) and genetic anomalies like Fragile X can decrease egg production.
  2. Ovarian tissue damage: Rough torsion, endometriosis triggered ovarian cysts, malignant or benign tumours, surgical removal of ovary or any other part of it, chemotherapy or radiation, pelvic adhesions, immunological problems or high BMI (Body Mass Index) can destroy the ovarian tissues.

IVF Protocols:
If a woman has low ovarian reserves, then she will be put on the either of the following protocols:

  1. Short GnRHa Flare: Gonadotrophin releasing-hormone-agonist (GnRHa) like Lupron, Nafarelin, Synarel or Buserelin is administered. This therapy is initiated at the onset of menstruation. The goal of the treatment is to stimulate the release of the follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) which augments the ovarian follicular growth.
  2. Combined Clomiphene or Gonadotrophin/Letrozole Stimulation: Older women are mostly administered this protocol. But it is strongly advised not to, as this protocol can potentially harm the egg or the embryo.
  3. Mid-follicular GnRH-antagonist protocol: Once the GnRHa-agonist protocol is commenced, the GnRH-antagonist is given several days later. Once the follicles reach the size of 12mm, GnRHa antagonists like Ganirelix, Orgalutran, Cetrotide and Cetrorelix are added. These drugs stop the pituitary from secreting the luteinizing hormone (FSH leads to secretion of this hormone).
  4. Long GnRHa Pituitary Down Regulation Protocol: This is the usual approach to deal with low ovarian reserves.
  5. Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol: This protocol inhibits FSH production. This protocol generally yields good results. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.
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IVF Protocol: Causes Behind Low Ovarian Reserve

Best Fertility Centre In India
IVF Specialist, Chennai
IVF Protocol: Causes Behind Low Ovarian Reserve

The available eggs in the ovaries at a time are collectively called an ovarian reserve. Low reserve happens when the production of eggs reduces. This affects the chances of pregnancy. The general cause of low reserves can be aging ovaries. In such cases, the ovary may be healthy and functioning even if the reserve is low. Production of eggs lower as a woman ages. A woman starts with 250,00 to 500,000 eggs at puberty and ends up with 1000 eggs at menopause.

Causes:
Low reserves are caused by

  1. Production of eggs decreases: Chromosomal abnormalities like Turner syndrome (lack of two X chromosomes) and genetic anomalies like Fragile X can decrease egg production.
  2. Ovarian tissue damage: Rough torsion, endometriosis triggered ovarian cysts, malignant or benign tumours, surgical removal of ovary or any other part of it, chemotherapy or radiation, pelvic adhesions, immunological problems or high BMI (Body Mass Index) can destroy the ovarian tissues.

IVF Protocols:
If a woman has low ovarian reserves, then she will be put on the either of the following protocols:

  1. Short GnRHa Flare: Gonadotrophin releasing-hormone-agonist (GnRHa) like Lupron, Nafarelin, Synarel or Buserelin is administered. This therapy is initiated at the onset of menstruation. The goal of the treatment is to stimulate the release of the follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) which augments the ovarian follicular growth.
  2. Combined Clomiphene or Gonadotrophin/Letrozole Stimulation: Older women are mostly administered this protocol. But it is strongly advised not to, as this protocol can potentially harm the egg or the embryo.
  3. Mid-follicular GnRH-antagonist protocol: Once the GnRHa-agonist protocol is commenced, the GnRH-antagonist is given several days later. Once the follicles reach the size of 12mm, GnRHa antagonists like Ganirelix, Orgalutran, Cetrotide and Cetrorelix are added. These drugs stop the pituitary from secreting the luteinizing hormone (FSH leads to secretion of this hormone).
  4. Long GnRHa Pituitary Down Regulation Protocol: This is the usual approach to deal with low ovarian reserves.
  5. Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol: This protocol inhibits FSH production. This protocol generally yields good results. Consult an Expert & get answers to your questions!
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Low Ovarian Reserve - How Can IVF Help?

The available eggs in the ovaries at a time are collectively called an ovarian reserve. Low reserve happens when the production of eggs reduces. This affects the chances of pregnancy. The general cause of low reserves can be aging ovaries. In such cases, the ovary may be healthy and functioning even if the reserve is low. Production of eggs lower as a woman ages. A woman starts with 250,00 to 500,000 eggs at puberty and ends up with 1000 eggs at menopause.

Causes:
Low reserves are caused by

  1. Production of eggs decreases: Chromosomal abnormalities like Turner syndrome (lack of two X chromosomes) and genetic anomalies like Fragile X can decrease egg production.
  2. Ovarian tissue damage: Rough torsion, endometriosis triggered ovarian cysts, malignant or benign tumours, surgical removal of ovary or any other part of it, chemotherapy or radiation, pelvic adhesions, immunological problems or high BMI (Body Mass Index) can destroy the ovarian tissues.

IVF Protocols:
If a woman has low ovarian reserves, then she will be put on the either of the following protocols:

  1. Short GnRHa Flare: Gonadotrophin releasing-hormone-agonist (GnRHa) like Lupron, Nafarelin, Synarel or Buserelin is administered. This therapy is initiated at the onset of menstruation. The goal of the treatment is to stimulate the release of the follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) which augments the ovarian follicular growth.
  2. Combined Clomiphene or Gonadotrophin/Letrozole Stimulation: Older women are mostly administered this protocol. But it is strongly advised not to, as this protocol can potentially harm the egg or the embryo.
  3. Mid-follicular GnRH-antagonist protocol: Once the GnRHa-agonist protocol is commenced, the GnRH-antagonist is given several days later. Once the follicles reach the size of 12mm, GnRHa antagonists like Ganirelix, Orgalutran, Cetrotide and Cetrorelix are added. These drugs stop the pituitary from secreting the luteinizing hormone (FSH leads to secretion of this hormone).
  4. Long GnRHa Pituitary Down Regulation Protocol: This is the usual approach to deal with low ovarian reserves.
  5. Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol: This protocol inhibits FSH production. This protocol generally yields good results.
3374 people found this helpful

Table of Content

About Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection
When is Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection prescribed?
What are the side effects of Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection?
Key highlights of Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection
What are the substitutes for Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection?
What are the dosage instructions?
What are the interactions for Cetrotide 0.25mg Injection?