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Dr.Vijayakumar

  4.5  (33 ratings)

Veterinarian Clinic

No12, 23rd Cross, Avvai Nagar Lawspet
1 Doctor · ₹250 · 6 Reviews
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Dr.Vijayakumar   4.5  (33 ratings) Veterinarian Clinic No12, 23rd Cross, Avvai Nagar Lawspet
1 Doctor · ₹250 · 6 Reviews
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Our medical care facility offers treatments from the best doctors in the field of Veterinarian, Veterinary Physician.Customer service is provided by a highly trained, professional staff w......more
Our medical care facility offers treatments from the best doctors in the field of Veterinarian, Veterinary Physician.Customer service is provided by a highly trained, professional staff who look after your comfort and care and are considerate of your time. Their focus is you.
More about Dr.Vijayakumar
Dr.Vijayakumar is known for housing experienced Veterinarians. Dr. Vijaya Kumar, a well-reputed Veterinarian, practices in Lawspet. Visit this medical health centre for Veterinarians recommended by 86 patients.

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Lawspet Lawspet, Pondicherry - 605008
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Dr. Vijaya Kumar

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90%  (33 ratings)
1 Year experience
250 at clinic
₹100 online
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07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
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8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

MVSc
Veterinarian,
8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

Cracker sounds are a stress for most pets – and can leave owners pretty frazzled too.

According to figures from the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) , 45% of dogs show signs of fear when they hear loud bangs.

And 65% of owners feel anxious for their pet as the bangers go off.

But with Diwali celebrations starting, planning can take the stress out during crackers bursting. Here’s ten things you can do to help:

1. Create a safe den or hideaway, like this cat tent, right. Before fireworks night, put treats, toys and blankets there so pets associate it with positive experiences. The RSPCA’s Professor Daniel Mills said: “Dogs learn this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks go off they may go there because they know no harm will come to them.”

2. Keep pets indoors. Cats should stay in and dogs walked in daylight.

3. Close curtains and play music or leave the TV on to muffle firework noise.

4. Protect small animals. Rabbits, guinea pigs or birds should be given extra bedding to burrow in and have an area of their cage or hutch covered with blankets.

5. Try letting pets smell essential oils – they can help to relax and soothe them.Use plug in pheromone diffusers.

6. Try calming supplements in their food.

7. Play with pets so they are tired and may sleep through the day.

8. Don’t punish a pet for reacting to noise – it will make things worse.

I have a kingfisher bird n I notice hs feather is falling any medication pls suggest.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
You can give multivitamin drops, kindly notice that the bird is pecking itself in aggressive manner, if so it may be due to nite infection also.
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Poultry Feed Formulation

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Poultry Feed Formulation

Formulation of 50 kg bag (broiler feed)

Broilers have different feed requirements in terms of energy, proteins, and minerals during different stages of their growth.Therefore, it is important that farmers adapt feed rations to these requirements for maximum production. Young broilers have a high protein requirement for the development of muscles, feathers, etc. As the broilers grow, their energy requirements for the deposit of fat increase and their protein requirements decrease. They require high protein content in their starter rations than in the grower and finisher rations. Broilers should have a feed that has between 22 – 24 per cent digestible crude protein, DCP.

 

The following guidelines can help the farmer to make the right feed at each stage of growth:

  • 7.2kg of whole maize
  • 11.9kg of maize germ
  • 9.5kg of wheat pollard
  • 7.2kg wheat bran
  • 4.3kg of cotton seed cake
  • 3.4kg of sunflower cake
  • 2.1kg of fishmeal
  • 1.4kg of lime
  • 2.5kg of soya meal
  • 45g of bone meal
  • 10g of grower PMX
  • 5g of salt
  • 5g of coccidiostat 
  •  5g of Zincbacitrach

 Broiler starter feed (1-4 weeks)

  • 28.6kg of whole maize
  • 8.6kg of fishmeal
  • 10kg of soya bean meal
  • 2.9kg of lime
  • 70g of premix

Amino acids to add

  •  35g of lysine
  •  35g of threonine

Preparing of layers chick mash (1-4 weeks)

chicks require feed with Digestible Crude Protein (DCP) of between 18 to 20 per cent. Amino acids are important nutrients in all feeds in order to make a complete feed for all animals. For hybrid chickens, the addition of amino acids is very important to maintain a balanced diet for fast growth

(50 kg bag of chick mash)

  • 22.5kg of whole maize
  • 6.5kg of wheat bran,
  • 5.0 kg of wheat pollard,
  • 12 kg of sunflower (or 12 kg of linseed),
  • 1.1 kg of fishmeal
  • 1.25 kg of lime
  • 30g of salt
  • 20g of premix

Amino acids to be added

  • 70g of tryptophan
  • 3.0g of lysine
  • 10g of methionine
  • 70 g of threonine
  • 50g of enzymes
  • 60g of coccidiostat
  • 50g of toxin binder


 To make a 50 kg bag growers feed (1 to 8 weeks), it is very necessary that pullets or young layers should be provided with a feed having a protein content of between 16 and 18 per cent. Such feed makes the pullet to grow fast and prepare for egg laying.

Note:  Layers’ feed should never be fed to chickens younger than 18 weeks as it contains calcium that can damage their kidneys (they can develop kidney stones), which interfere with egg production and also shorten their lifespan. Grit (sand) should be provided to growers that are not on free range to aid in digestion.

70 kg bag layer mash (18 weeks and above)

  • 24.3kg of whole maize
  • 8.6kg of Soya
  • 5.7kg of fishmeal
  • 7.1kg of maize bran, rice germ or wheat bran
  • 4.3 kg of lime
  • 180g premix

Amino acids to be added

  • 70g lysine
  • 35g methionine
  • 70kg threonine
  • 35g tryptophan
  • 50g toxin binder

Note: Layer feed should contain a Digestible Crude Protein (DCP) content of between 16-18 per cent. Calcium is important for the formation of eggshells (Laying hens that do not get enough calcium will use the calcium stored in their own bone tissue to produce eggshells). Layer feed should be introduced at 18 weeks.

 Important tips

  • When making home made feed rations, it is important to do experimental trials. Isolate a number of chickens, feed them and observing their performance. If the feed rations are right, the broilers will grow fast and the layers will increase egg production (at least 1 egg after every 27 hours).
  • Farmers should be very careful with the quality of feed ingredients or raw materials. Poultry, especially chickens are very sensitive to feeds that contain mycotoxins which are present in most of the raw materials. Never use rotten maize to make chicken feed.
  • Buy quality fishmeal from reputable companies. If omena(silver cyprinid) is used the farmers must be sure of its quality; most of the omena in the open-air markets may be contaminated.
  • It is very important to mix all the micronutrients (amino acids) first before mixing with the rest of the feed.
  • For mixing, farmers are advised to use a drum mixer (many welding artisans can make one). Never use a shovel to mix feed because the ingredients will be unevenly distributed.
  • Never use rotten raw materials like maize to make feed. Rotten materials might contain mycotoxins which are detrimental to poultry health.
  • Small scale families can contribute resources to the making of feed to ensure high-quality feed materials are used and also reduce costs.

Note: To improve on the feed quality, farmers making their own feeds should always have it tested to ensure the feed is well balanced.You can take your feed samples to agro-chemical industries for testing to ensure the feeds are balanced nutritionally.

 

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Benefits of Dogs and Children Growing Up Together!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Constant Companionship

Although childhood isn't always easy, having a pet provides constant companionship through the ups and downs. Dogs can be a great source of comfort for kids — even when they're coming to grips with difficult life lessons. Whenever kids feel sad, angry, or afraid, they can always turn to their pet. Petting and cuddling dogs has also been shown to relieve stress and help people relax.

2. A More Active Lifestyle

Caring for a dog also encourages a more active lifestyle. In fact, a recent study showed that kids with dogs exercise eleven minutes a day more than their non-dog owning peers. That might not sound like a lot, but over a week or month, it really adds up. Many dogs require daily walks or runs and plenty of play time. Those adorable puppy eyes they give you are sure to motivate you — even when you're not feeling up to it.

3. Learning Responsibility

Having a pet is a great way to teach responsibility to kids. Making sure that the family dog has food and water gives children a first glimpse of accountability and obligation. Children also learn empathy and compassion by caring for their pet, while developing a higher level of self-esteem by taking care of their pet-owning responsibilities.

4. Health Is Wealth

Recent studies have found that babies raised in close contact with a pet get sick less often in their first year of life, meaning fewer visits to the doctor's office. Exposure to pet dander and the microbes that pets carry into the home from the outdoors is suggested to improve babies' developing immune systems. Research has also found that children who grow up with dogs experience a reduced risk of allergies.

5. Don't Worry, Be Happy!

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits of dogs in early childhood is simply that they make children happy! Interaction with animals has been proven to raise levels of serotonin and dopamine, which are the chemical building blocks of positive feelings. All science aside, playing and interacting with dogs is just plain fun — and it's bound to brighten any kid's day.

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5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

Summer Management For Dogs!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

Summer can mean lots of fun outside with your dog. But when the temps soar, take steps to protect your pet. Whether you take him for a walk down the street, a ride in the car, or just out in the yard to play, the heat can be hard on him. Here's how to keep your furry best friend safe.

1. Never leave your dog in the car. No, not even if you think you’ll only be a few minutes. Even when it isn’t that hot outside, the temp can soar inside a closed car. On an 85-degree day, it can reach 102 F within 10 minutes. And that's with a window cracked. After 30 minutes, it could be up to 120. Leave your dog at home, or go places where he can come with you.

2. Keep your house cool. If Fido’s home alone, make sure he can truly chill. Leave the air conditioner on and close the drapes. If you don't have AC, open the windows and turn on a fan. You may want to try a cooling vest or mat to see if they help.

3. Watch when you exercise. Limit when and how much you do when it's hot and humid. Take walks in the cooler part of the day, in the early morning and evening hours. Carry water, too -- enough for both of you.

4. Check the pavement. Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it's too hot for your hand, it's too hot for your dog's paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn.

5. Offer plenty of water and shade. Don't leave your pooch alone outside for long. And when he is there, make sure he has shade and lots of fresh, cool water. Add ice cubes when you can. Trees are better than doghouses for shade. They let air flow through. Doghouses can trap the heat and make it worse. Think about a kiddie pool or a sprinkler to help your pal cool off in the yard.Make cool treats. Help your canine chill from the inside out. For puppy popsicles, make ice cubes with tasty treats inside. Or fill and freeze a chew toy to make a chilly snack.

6. Keep an eye on the humidity, too. When the air is full of moisture, your dog may not be able to pant enough to cool himself off. That can raise his temperature, which can lead to heatstroke. Stay inside, and limit exercise, too.

7. Take care of at-risk dogs. Be watchful if you have a snub-nosed pet like a pug or bulldog. Their smaller airways make it harder for them to release heat when they pant. It's also easy for old and overweight dogs, or those with heart and breathing problems, to get heatstroke.

8. Groom your pet. If your dog has long hair, get rid of any mats and tangles. It will help keep him cool. Don't shave or clip his coat before you talk to your vet or groomer. The extra fur that keeps him warm in winter may also keep him cool in summer.

9. Watch for signs of overheating. Your dog can't tell you when he doesn't feel well, so keep an eye out for heatstroke, which can have these symptoms:

  • Heavy panting
  • Heavy drooling
  • Trouble breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dark or red gums and tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Agitation
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Canine Parvo Viral Entirities (Brief)

MVSc
Veterinarian,

Signs and symptoms of canine parvovirus include the following:

1. Bloody diarrhea (often severe)

2. Fever.Lethargy (lack of energy)

3. Loss of appetite.

4. Malaise (discomfort associated with illness)

5. Rapid weight loss.

6. Vomiting.

Canine parvovirus is an acute illness, which means that symptoms develop suddenly, usually within 3–10 days of exposure. In most cases, dogs that are infected with the virus do not develop the disease (called asymptomatic infection). Canine parvovirus often is fatal in puppies. Sometimes, puppies collapse and die without showing prior signs of infection.

Complications 

Dehydration, secondary infections, sepsis and a condition in which part of the intestine slips into the part below it (called intussusception). CPV also can damage the spleen. Dogs that have another health condition are at increased risk for developing severe complications and illness.

Causes and Risk Factors for Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus is caused by infection with CPV, most often, CPV-2a or CPV-2b. All dogs are at risk for developing canine parvovirus. Puppies less than 4 months old and dogs that have not been vaccinated against the virus are at increased risk for infection.

Newborn puppies receive antibodies from their mothers that help provide immunity, but immunity to CPV wears off before the puppies' immune systems are developed enough to destroy the virus and fight off infection. Dogs in pet stores, animal shelters, and breeding kennels also are at increased risk. Overcrowding and poor sanitary conditions make it easier for the virus to spread. Certain breeds of dog (e.g., English springer, spaniels, rottweilers, Doberman pinschers) and dogs that have another health condition may have a higher risk for developing severe disease.

Laboratory tests

 Tests include blood analysis (e.g., to detect a low white blood cell count) and other tests to detect the virus (e.g., ELISA, electron microscopy). ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), which detects the presence of the virus in stool, is used most often. In some cases, recent immunization with the live virus can produce a false positive test result.

 

Basic Signs of Canine Parvo Viral Enterities!

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Basic Signs of Canine Parvo Viral Enterities!

Signs and symptoms of canine parvovirus include the following:

1. Bloody diarrhea (often severe)
2. Fever.
Lethargy (lack of energy)
3. Loss of appetite.
4. Malaise (discomfort associated with illness)
5. Rapid weight loss.
6. Vomiting.

Chocolate brown handsome with Black Beauty ....

BVSc
Veterinarian,
-

BVSc
Veterinarian,
bulbul

Home Remedies For Ur Dogs

BVSc
Veterinarian,

When you're feeling under the weather, you might find that the perfect thing for treating what ails you is something you already have in the kitchen. Did you know that you can use similar, simple home remedies to treat allergies in dogs, ailments in dogs, and other canine annoyances, too? with some simple home remedies too? below you will find seven great natural remedies for making your dog happy and healthy again, whether they are suffering from allergies, dehyrdation, fleas, and more.

1. Vitamin e for dogs with dry skin

Have you ever wondered how to treat dry skin on dogs? vitamin e is good for preventing those pesky age lines on your face, and it's also great for your dog's dry skin. You can give your pup a doggy massage by applying vitamin e oil directly to the skin, a soaking bath with vitamin e added to the water, or you can go all" hollywood" and pop your dog a pill (of vitamin e, that is). 

If you give the vitamin orally, check with your vet on the recommended dosage for your specific dog breed. 

2. Electrolyte-replacing liquids for diarrhea and vomiting

Flavorless electrolyte-replacing liquids, such as sports waters or pediatric drinks, not only help athletes to replenish fluids, and babies to rehydrate after an illness, they can also supply your sick pooch's body with much needed fluids after a bout of diarrhea or vomiting. 


Consult your veterinarian as to the appropriate dosage amounts when giving these types of liquids to your dog. 

3. Yogurt and acidophilus for dogs

Deliciously plain yogurt is a healthy treat for your dog. Just as with humans, the live acidophilus in the yogurt keeps the good bacteria in your dog's intestines in balance, so that bad bacteria is swiftly knocked out. If your dog is on antibiotics, a little yogurt will also help keep yeast infections at bay (a common side-effect of antibiotic treatment). You can also give your dog acidophilus pills -- wrapping the pills in bacon is strictly optional. 

Puppies are especially prone to yeast infections, so a little plain yogurt as a snack (or even dessert) can help keep things in balance; especially useful while the intestinal system is building immunities. 

4. Chamomile tea for dogs

Chamomile tea uses the natural disinfecting effects of the chamomile plant to settle upset doggy tummies. It is recommended for colic, gas, and anxiety. It can also alleviate minor skin irritations. Just chill in the fridge and spray onto the affected area on the dog's raw skin. Your dog should feel an immediate soothing effect as the chilled tea kills the yeast and/or bacteria on the skin. A warm (not hot) tea bag can also be used for soothing infected or irritated eyes. 5. Oatmeal to stop your dog from itching

An itchy dog can be quite an annoyance, especially as it goes around scratching itself on any piece of furniture it can reach. But don't blame your dog, sometimes they're ircy because of allergies and can't help but to scratch. If your pup is itchy, forget the backscratcher! finely ground oatmeal is a time-honored remedy for irritated skin. You can use baby oatmeal cereal or grind it yourself in a food processor. Stir the oatmeal into a bath of warm water and let your dog soak in the healing goodness. Your dog will thank you, trust us. Dogs with skin allergies, infections, and other diseases which cause itchiness have been shown to gain immediate relief with this approach, too. 

6. Epsom salt bath for dogs' wounds

Dogs can be like kids at times, and as such they are bound to suffer from wounds and the occasional unexplained swelling. Try treating these ailments with epsom salt soaks and heat packs next time. A bath consisting of epsom salt and warm water can help reduce the swelling and the healing time, especially when combined with prescribed antibiotics and veterinary supervision. Be sure that your pet does not ingest epsom salt, however, as it can be very harmful. Also, do not bathe your pet in epsom salt if there are open wounds.

If soaking your dog in an epsom salt bath twice a day for five minutes isn't convenient or practical, a homemade heat pack using a clean towel drenched in the same warm-water solution can be applied to wounds for the same effect. 


7. Flea home remedies


Does your dog have fleas? some dogs are allergic to flea bites and just one can cause them to itch for days. Never fear. Before turning to the big guns, try some borax powder. The standard stuff at the store will work wonders on fleas by poking holes in their crunchy insect exoskeletons. A good way to make sure those parasitic suckers get annihilated is to sprinkle the borax on your floor, and then sweep or vacuum up the excess. The invisible borax crystals left behind will kill the fleas and you won't even have to lift a finger. It's inexpensive and practically non-toxic compared to an appointment with the exterminator, just make sure that your dog does not ingest any borax.

To relieve the dog's allergies and repel fleas in its fur, try a simple solution of lemon water. Fleas are repelled by citrus, so this can work both as a flea preventive, and for making your dog smell clean and refreshing. A useful solution can be made by pouring boiled water over lemons and allowing them to steep over night. This solution can then be applied all over your dog's skin using a fresh spray bottle. And, the tried and true brewer's yeast method cannot be left out. Brewer's yeast can be given as part of a regular diet in powdered form, sprinkled over the dog food, or in tablet form, perhaps wrapped in a small slice of bacon or cheese.

Home (or holistic) remedies aren't just for tree huggers anymore. It's important to take care of your dog from day to day, not just when it's feeling a little under the weather, and the best way to maintain the best health is often the most natural way. But most of all, it'll help keeping your" baby" from crying like a hound dog.

My pug is not behaving well and also not eating as she eats normally, it happens from last 2 weeks when she started suffering from her periods, what can I do for her any ideas? Please let me know if you guys have any suggestions.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
In come cases, female dogs normally doesn't feel active & don't have the urge to eat during periods. It will become normal after few days after the periods are over.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Watch "Vige.Dr #AnimalsInLove" on YouTube - Vige.Dr #AnimalsInLove: https://youtu.be/CEMfiLzdP7c

BVSc
Veterinarian,
Five Common Summer Hazards for Dogs

1. Dehydration
One of the best ways to keep your dog safe in the summer time is by providing lots of cool, clean, fresh water. Consider preparing low sodium chicken broth or yogurt ice cubes, and introducing canned dog foods (best when frozen in a Kong!) to increase the moisture content in your dog’s diet.

2. Burned Pads
Under the summer sun, asphalt on sidewalks and streets can heat to a temperature that can burn a dog’s paws. To avoid scorched paws, walk your dog very early in the morning or in the late evening when the streets have cooled off. If you must walk your dog during the day, dog booties can protect his feet. Always put your hand down on the asphalt for about thirty seconds – if you must pull your hand away because the street is too hot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on without hurting his paws. If you don’t want your hand on the street for thirty seconds, your dog probably does not want his paws on it for thirty or more minutes of walking.

3. Parasites
Summer is the season for fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes; pests which can present a minor discomfort to your dog at best and at worst may be life threatening or cause self-mutilating behaviors. Feeding your dog a high quality diet, without preservatives or chemicals will build his immune system, making him generally more resistant to parasite infestation. There are a wide variety of preventatives on the market, including chemical spot-on treatments, repellent shampoos, essential oils, and flea/tick collars; talk to your vet to see what she recommends for your dog. Cleaning your house frequently and keeping your dog well groomed will also reduce the risk of parasite infestation.

4. Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a serious risk to dog’s health – in worst case scenarios, it can be fatal. You can prevent heat stroke by restricting your pet’s exercise during the hottest hours of the day (early morning or late evening are the best times for exercise during the summer), by making sure he is well hydrated, providing cool places for him to relax, providing opportunities to swim, cooling mats, and by never leaving your dog unattended in the car during summer heat.

Many dogs die annually in hot cars. Even if your windows are cracked or you park in the shade, heat can build quickly in a car in the summer, turning it into an oven. If it’s 95 degrees at noon and you leave your windows cracked, the temperature in your car may still rise as high as 113 degrees. This is a recipe for disaster for your dog. If you must leave your dog in the car for any period of time, the air conditioning should stay on. Leaving a dog to die in a hot car is not just a health risk for your dog, but may be cause for animal cruelty charges in some area. The solution? Don’t leave your dog in a hot car.

5. Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is contracted through bodily fluids or tissue and can be transmitted through direct (as in the case of a bite or ingestion of flesh) or indirect contact (through water sources, food, etc.) with an infected animal. Stagnant waters are a common source of leptospirosis bacteria. Lepto can cause permanent health problems or death if not treated quickly. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, trembling/shaking, lethargy, anorexia, tenderness of joints and muscles, and increased water intake. If you suspect your dog has lepto, get him to a vet right away, an emergency vet if need be.

There are vaccines for lepto but they do not prevent all strains and can cause significant adverse reactions. Talk to your vet about weighing the risk of infection with the risks associated with the lepto vaccine.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
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