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Dr. Suchandra Das

Nephrologist, Kolkata

500 - 600 at clinic
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Dr. Suchandra Das Nephrologist, Kolkata
500 - 600 at clinic
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I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Suchandra Das
Dr. Suchandra Das is a trusted Nephrologist in Ruby Hospital, Kolkata. He is currently practising at Fortis Hospital Kolkata in Ruby Hospital, Kolkata. Book an appointment online with Dr. Suchandra Das and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Nephrologists from across India. You will find Nephrologists with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Nephrologists online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English
Hindi
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Indian Medical Association (IMA)

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Fortis Hospital Kolkata

#730, Eastern Metropolitan Bypass, Anandapur. Landmark : Near Ruby Hospital, KolkataKolkata Get Directions
600 at clinic
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Neo Bacto Clinical Laboratory Private Limited

#46, Park Street. Landmark: Near Punjab National Bank & Apeejay School & Opp. to Suraj Saree Showroom, KolkataBhopal Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Fortis Hospital - Kolkata

#730, Anandapur ,EM Bypass. Landmark: Near Ruby General Hospital & Kolkata International School, KolkataKolkata Get Directions
600 at clinic
...more
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Common Symptoms and Treatments Available for Kidney Stones

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB - Urology
Urologist, Delhi
Common Symptoms and Treatments Available for Kidney Stones

Our kidneys are an important organ in the body and are responsible for the filtration of blood and creation of urine. Sometimes, during this process salt and other chemicals get stuck together to form small crystals also known as kidney stones. The size of a kidney stone can range from the size of a sugar crystal to the size of a ping pong ball. However, it is noticed only if it is large enough to cause a blockage. Smaller stones may pass out of the body without you realizing it.

Kidney stones can be a very painful experience. Some of the symptoms exhibited by patients suffering from kidney stones are:

1. Severe back pain
2. Pain in the belly or groin
3. Painful urination
4. Frequent urination
5. Nausea and vomiting
6. Blood in the urine

Excruciating pain is usually the symptom that makes a patient consult a doctor in cases of kidney stone problems. A confirmed diagnosis can then be made by using a series of tests that include an X-ray, ultrasound, CT scan and urine analysis. A blood test may also be conducted to check the mineral levels in the body.

Kidney stones are a common condition faced by many people, but some people are at a higher risk of suffering from this than others. Some of these factors are:

1. Family history of kidney stones

2. High uric acid levels in the blood
3. Being between 20-50 years of age
4. A previous kidney stone
5. Chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure
6. Some medication such as diuretics and antacids with calcium
7. Inadequate fluid intake

Between men and women, the former are at a higher risk of suffering from kidney stones. Asians and Caucasians also suffer from this condition more than people from other races. Hormone changes during pregnancy can also trigger the formation of kidney stones.

The first thing to do if you suffer from a kidney stone is to increase your water intake. This can help dissolve some of the minerals in the stone and make it a small enough to pass through the urethra. Injectable anti-inflammatory drugs and pain relievers may be used to ease the pain caused by kidney stones.

If the kidney stone does not pass on its own, a process known as lithotripsy may also be used. This involves the administration of shock waves that can break a large stone into smaller pieces. In extreme cases, surgical techniques may also be used. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor and ask a free question.

2812 people found this helpful

Hi. Currently I am facing kidney stones pain issues repeatedly. So could you please what are the blood reports required. So that I can taken and sharing to you. Please advice on it.

FIMSA, MD-Nephrology, DM - Nephrology, MD-Medcine, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Hi. Currently I am facing kidney stones pain issues repeatedly. So could you please what are the blood reports requir...
Hi lybrate-user, nice to know that you want a cure for your problem of kidney stones. You can get some tests done- Urine-re, me,kft, lipid profile, USG-KUB, Plain x-ray- abdomen and share the reports .Meanwhile start having 3.5 - 4 liters water daily. All the best.
22 people found this helpful
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Sir, I am facing kidney stone problem. I am hypertensive too. My blood pressure is 150/100 mgh with medicine. Can I leave medicine with yoga and exercise?

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Nephrology
Nephrologist, Delhi
Sir, I am facing kidney stone problem. I am hypertensive too. My blood pressure is 150/100 mgh with medicine. Can I l...
If you eat healthy and exercise regularly, there are good chances the dosage of medicine will come down....
1 person found this helpful
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I am suffering from kidney stone since last 10 month. It is of size 4 mm. I do drink lots of water daily but its not really working. What should I do?

BHMS
Homeopath, Thane
I am suffering from kidney stone since last 10 month. It is of size 4 mm. I do drink lots of water daily but its not ...
Hi drox 23 drops (haslab) 10 drops in 1/4th cup of water drink thrice a day for 30 days berberis vulgaris q 10 drops in 1/4th cup of water drink thrice a day.
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I have a stone stuck in the urethra and its been one day now. I can easily urinate only thing is that I feel pain at the start when urine gets passed. Please help me with some medication.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Zirakpur
I have a stone stuck in the urethra and its been one day now. I can easily urinate only thing is that I feel pain at ...
Take max water and use Kalmi shora and sarji kshar with water or aerated drink. Take from Pansari or Ayurveda shop.
1 person found this helpful
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Surgical Management of Kidney Stones

MBBS, MS - Urology, DNB
Urologist, Guwahati
Surgical Management of Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are not exactly stones, but hard deposits that are composed of minerals such as calcium or uric acid. These deposits start accumulating and over time enlarge to form obstructions within the urinary tract. Most kidney stones pass out on their own with little or no medication required, but in some cases, they have to be taken out through surgery. Let us now look at the surgery options available for the removal of kidney stones and why they are needed.

Need for surgery:
You might have to opt for a surgical procedure if you are in a lot of pain and if the stone is very large and cannot pass out on its own. Surgery will also be advised if the stone blocks the urinary tract hampering the free flow of urine. There are four types of surgical procedures that can be done for kidney stones.

  1. Shockwave lithotripsy
  2. Ureteroscopy
  3. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy
  4. Open surgery

Shock Wave Lithotripsy
This is the most common procedure that is performed for the removal of a kidney stone. It works best for small or medium stones. It is noninvasive - there are no cuts or scars made in your skin. In this procedure, the doctor after identifying the exact location of the stone sends out shock waves aimed at your kidneys. This dislodges the stone and breaks it into small pieces. This is a painless procedure, and no hospitalization is needed. You might have blood in the urine for a few days after the procedure, but it is considered normal and heals on its own. Check with your doctor in case you experience any complications

Ureteroscopy
This procedure is recommended to treat stones in the kidneys and ureters. A thin, flexible scope is used to find and remove the stones. There are no cuts made, and you will be under anesthesia throughout the procedure. A thin scope is passed through your bladder and ureter to reach the kidney. Once the exact location of the stone is reached, the doctor uses a small basket to scoop out the stone. In case the stone is big, a laser is used to break the stones. This is procedure too does not require a hospital stay. Recovery time is short and you can get back to normal activities soon.


Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy or Percutaneous Nephrolithotripsy
This procedure is done when you have a large size stone and the other methods do not work. In this procedure, a small cut is made in the back, and a thin tube is inserted to reach the stone. Once it reaches the stone, high-frequency sound waves are used to break the stone. You will be under anesthesia throughout the procedure. This can be considered as the most successful types of procedure and is routinely used to remove large stones. Recovery time is short but a short stay in hospital of about a day will be required.

Open surgery
This procedure is rarely done nowadays as it involves the traditional method of surgery. However in some rare cases, when your stone is very large, and the other methods are not an option this approach is used. Hospitalization is required for this procedure and the recovery period usually takes between 4 to 6 weeks. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2773 people found this helpful

Hi my grandmother. Has a problem regarding. Blood while urinating. Is this mean anything serious. She is 65 years old.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath, Patna
Hi  my grandmother. Has a  problem regarding. Blood while urinating. Is this mean anything  serious. She is 65 years ...
Hello, she might have some sort of urine infection causing haemoturia, please contact some urologist in this regard. Moreover, give her homoeo medicine/ @ can notherish 200-6 pills, dly morning, orally. @ carbo veg 200-6 pills, thrice a day, orally avoid, caffiene, alcohol, junk food, pizza, burger, cold, spicy, fried intake. Tk, care.
1 person found this helpful
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I have problem in urination, the pressure made by my bladder doesn't affect much, but my weight is also too low. I have sometime pain in testis too. Help.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath, Patna
I have problem in urination, the pressure made by my bladder doesn't affect much, but my weight is also too low.
I ha...
Hello, take, homoeo-medicine** @ rhodo 200-6 pills, thrice a day. @ aconite nap-30 6 pills, thrice a day. R you taking 3/4 glasses of water. Your diet b easily digestible report wkly.
1 person found this helpful
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I'm suffering from enlarged prostate and related problems such as urgency to pass urine as well as getting up many a times at night to pass urine which disturbs my sleep. I'm 60 years of age without any other health issues. Please prescribe treatment. Thanks.

MD - Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Hyderabad
I'm suffering from enlarged prostate and related problems such as urgency to pass urine as well as getting up many a ...
My Dear lybrate-user ji. This is a common problem in the old age. Nothing to worry about much. Every man has to pass through this inevitably. So we have to adjust with this with out worrying much. Do meditation Pranayama regularly with little exercise and good diet. Spend good time with your family and good friends. Read good books and do some charity to the society. Take following Chandra prabha vati 2tabs morning and evening with milk. Shilajith caps 1 morning and evening.
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I have stones in my kidneys at least 10 stones measuring large one 10 mm & some others are 8, 3, 5, 7, 2, mm and please give me any solution to recover this.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS, FISPN & FISPN - Pediatric Nephrology
Pediatrician, Delhi
I have stones in my kidneys at least 10 stones measuring large one 10 mm & some others are 8, 3, 5, 7, 2, mm  and ple...
Patient information leaflet on kidney stones. Having a kidney stone can be painful and distressing. Most stones pass out of the body without any treatment. But for those that don't, there are good treatments available. What are kidney stones? kidney stones are solid, stone-like lumps that can form in your kidneys. They are made from waste chemicals in your urine. Stones can also form in your bladder and the tubes that carry urine from your kidneys to your bladder (these are called ureters). Stones can stay in your kidneys without causing problems. But some might travel out of your body in the flow of urine. If they are very small, they can pass out of your body without you noticing. But larger ones can rub against the tubes or even get stuck. This can be extremely painful. There are four types of kidney stones? the most common type contains calcium. These stones are called calcium oxalate stones? uric acid stones form if there is too much uric acid in your urine. Uric acid is a waste product made when food is digested? struvite stones develop after a urinary infection, such as cystitis? cystine stones are caused by a rare inherited condition called cystinuria. It is important to know what kind of stone you have, as this will affect your treatment to prevent future stones. What are the symptoms? the main symptom is pain. This can be a dull ache in your back or side, or an extremely sharp, cramping pain. The pain usually comes on suddenly. It might spread down to your tummy or groin. You might also? feel sweaty or sick? be sick? find blood in your urine. This is caused by the stone rubbing against the walls of the ureter? need to urinate more often or feel a burning sensation when you urinate. Your doctor is likely to suspect you have a kidney stone if you have sudden, severe pain in your side and blood in your urine. You'll probably be sent to hospital for an x-ray. If you have a kidney stone, these tests may show how big the stone is and where it is stuck. If the x-ray does not show a kidney stone, you will probably have more tests to find out what's causing the pain. You may not get any symptoms with a kidney stone. You might find out you have one when you have an x-ray for another reason. What treatments work? stones that are less than 1 centimetre across often pass out of the body without any treatment. It can take two days to four weeks for this to happen. You can help the process along by drinking plenty of water to increase the flow of urine. You'll also need to take strong painkillers for the pain. If you have a stone stuck in a tube (ureter), your doctor might recommend taking a medicine called an alpha-blocker. This type of drug is often used to treat high blood pressure or symptoms of an enlarged prostate, but studies show it can also help stones to pass through the ureters faster. You'll probably be able to stay at home during this time, although you may need x-rays to check on the progress of the stone. Your doctor may ask you to catch the stone with a tea strainer or something similar as it comes out. This is so your doctor can see what type of stone you have. Knowing the type of stone will help them work out what you can do to prevent more stones. Surgical treatments larger stones and those that don't pass out of the body need treatment. All the following treatments work well? shock wave therapy uses shock waves to break up stones into small pieces that can pass out of the body. Many stones are dealt with this way and it avoids any operation. You might sit in a tub of water or lie on a table to have this treatment. You'll have a local anaesthetic to numb the area that's being treated. You may need several treatments to break up hard or large stones. The risk of side effects after this treatment is small. But you could get an infection in your kidney or a stone stuck in your ureter afterwards? you may need a minor operation if a stone in your kidney is large or in an awkward place. It's called a percutaneous nephrolithotomy (pcnl. You will have a general anaesthetic, so you will not be awake for the operation. You will probably have to stay in hospital. The doctor will make a small cut in your back and pass a needle and a very thin tube into your kidney to remove the stone. Like all operations, there can be problems (complications). The main ones are constipation and infections. Kidney stones? if the stone is stuck in a tube (ureter), you may have a ureteroscopy. You don't need any cuts made in your body for this, and you can probably go home the same day. You can have a local or general anaesthetic. The doctor feeds a long, thin wire up through your bladder and into the ureter to reach the stone. The doctor then either removes the stone or breaks it up with shock waves. This procedure works well, but it does have risks. In one study, about 1 out of 10 people who had this treatment had a damaged or torn ureter afterwards. What will happen to me? if you've had a kidney stone you have about a 1 in 2 chance of getting another one within five years to seven years. Your doctor can prescribe medicines to help stop you getting some types of stones. The type of medicine you get depends on the type of stone you've had. For example, you may need to take diuretics (water pills) to reduce calcium in your urine if your stone contained calcium. If you have too much uric acid in your urine you might be given a drug called allopurinol (the brand names are caplenal, cosuric, and zyloric). Your risk of getting more stones may also be affected by what you eat and drink. To reduce your risk, you can? drink more than two litres of water a day? eat a healthy diet, including calcium but not calcium supplements. Foods rich in calcium include milk and other dairy products, peas and beans, leafy green vegetables, nuts, and bony fish like sardines and salmon? avoid using lots of salt? eat more vegetables. Vegetables make the urine less acidic. If you've had a calcium oxalate stone, you may need to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet. This means cutting down on chocolate, nuts, rhubarb, strawberries, spinach, coffee, and tea. But changes in diet don't work for everyone, and there is not a lot of evidence to show how well they work. So it's important to talk to your doctor before making big changes to what you eat.
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