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Dr. P.N. Murthy

MBBS

Oncologist, Hyderabad

400 at clinic
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Dr. P.N. Murthy MBBS Oncologist, Hyderabad
400 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. P.N. Murthy
Dr. P.N. Murthy is an experienced Oncologist in Nampally, Hyderabad. He has done MBBS . You can meet Dr. P.N. Murthy personally at Medwin Hospitals in Nampally, Hyderabad. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. P.N. Murthy on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Oncologists in India. You will find Oncologists with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Oncologists online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MBBS - - -

Location

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Medwin Hospitals

1st Floor, North Block, Nampally. Landmark: Raghava Ratna Towers & Chirag Ali Lane, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
400 at clinic
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Medwin Hospitals

Chirag Ali Lane Landmark : Raghavana Ratna TowersHyderabad Get Directions
400 at clinic
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How to cure the meniastal seminoma which is a type of a cancer and also the price it would take to cure it.

DNB, MBBS
Oncologist, Faridabad
Dear sir, mediastenal germ cell tumours are treated by chemotherapy and usually respond well. Radiation therapy may also be offered. Price may vary from set up you want to take treatment from. At regional cancer centres, medical college it may be very economical.
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My friend's father is suffering from Mouth Cancer. Everyday he is suffering from pain. Please let us know what would be the best way to get rid from it.

MBBS, DNB ( Radiation Oncology)
Oncologist, Mumbai
He needs to be evaluated by an oncologist to examine the extent of disease. If it can be operated it should be removed surgically by an onco surgeon followed by adjuvant treatment after the histopathology report.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello my prostate size is 34 cc and pvr is 17 cc I am taking continuous medicine for it So pls guide is this prostate size harmful or not I visit doctor after 3 months for regular check up and ultrasound.

MS - General Surgery, MBSS
General Surgeon, Mumbai
Hello my prostate size is 34 cc and pvr is 17 cc
I am taking continuous medicine for it
So pls guide is this prostate...
Hi, Till the time you do not experience any problems regarding passing urine its fine. But do follow your regular check up.
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What are the symptoms of mouth cancer what types of precautions and medicine should be taken?

MS ( General Surgery)
Oncologist, Mandsaur
Oral cancer symptoms Some of the most common oral cancer symptoms and signs include: •Persistent mouth sore: A sore in the mouth that does not heal is the most common symptom of oral cancer •Pain: Persistent mouth pain is another common oral cancer sign •A lump or thickening in the cheek •A white or red patch on the gums, tongue, tonsil, or lining of the mouth •A sore throat or feeling that something is caught in the throat that does not go away •Difficulty swallowing or chewing •Difficulty moving the jaw or tongue •Numbness of the tongue or elsewhere in the mouth •Jaw swelling that makes dentures hurt or fit poorly •Loosening of the teeth •Pain in the teeth or jaw ••Voice changes •A lump in the neck •Weight loss •Persistent bad breath If any of these oral cancer symptoms or signs are present for days or weeks, your doctor may recommend tests to check for oral cancer. As with any cancer, having your cancer diagnosed as soon as possible will help ensure that any treatment is as effective as possible. Screening for oral cancer Although routine screening for oral cancer is not typically recommended, several tests can be done if any of the symptoms of this disease are present and do not go away. Oral cancer risk factors GENERAL •Gender: Oral cancer and oropharyngeal cancer are twice as common in men as in women. This difference may be related to the use of alcohol and tobacco, a major oral cancer risk factor that is seen more commonly in men than women. According to the American Cancer Society, the gender difference is decreasing among oral cancer patients as more women are using tobacco and drinking. •Age: The average age at diagnosis for oral cancer is 62, and two-thirds of individuals with this disease are over age 55. •Ultraviolet light: Cancers of the lip are more common among people who work outdoors or others with prolonged exposure to sunlight. Poor nutrition: Studies have found a link between diets low in fruits and vegetables and an increased oropharynx and oral cancer risk. GENETICS •Genetic syndromes: Some inherited genetic mutations, which cause different syndromes in the body, carry a high risk of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. These include: •Fanconi anemia: This blood condition is caused by inherited abnormalities in several genes. Problems can begin at an early age and often lead to leukemia or aplastic anemia. The risk of oral cancer among people with Fanconi anemia is up to 500 times higher than among the general population. •Dyskeratosis congenita: This genetically linked syndrome can also cause aplastic anemia, and carries a very high risk of mouth and throat cancer occurring at an early age. LIFESTYLE •Tobacco use: About 80% of people with oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers use tobacco in the form of cigarettes, chewing tobacco or snuff. The risk of developing oral cancer depends on the duration and frequency of tobacco use. Smoking can lead to cancer in the mouth or throat, and oral tobacco products are associated with cancer in the cheeks, gums, and inner surface of the lips. •Alcohol: About 70% of people diagnosed with oral cancer are heavy drinkers. This risk is higher for people who use both alcohol and tobacco. For people who smoke and drink heavily, the risk of oral cancer may be as high as 100% more than the risk for people who do not smoke or drink. •Betel quid: Many people in Southeast Asia, South Asia, and others parts of the world chew betel quid, a leaf from the betel plant wrapped around areca nut and lime. Chewing gutka, a combination of betel quid and tobacco, is also common. Both of these substances are associated with an increased oral cancer risks. OTHER CONDITIONS •Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: Human papilloma viruses, or HPV, include about 100 similar viruses. Many HPVs cause warts, but some are involved in cancer. Most noteworthy, HPV is tied to the development of cervical cancer. HPV is also a risk factor for oral and oropharyngeal cancers. About 25 percent of patients with these cancers are infected with the same HPVs as are seen in with cervical cancer. In particular, there is a strong link between HPV-16 and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV appears to be a more serious risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer than for oral cavity cancers. People with oral cancers linked to HPV tend to not be smokers or drinkers, and usually have a good prognosis. Typically, HPV infections in the mouth and throat do not produce any symptoms, and only a small percentage of these infections develop into cancer. Read about the recent increase in HPV-related cancers. •Immune system suppression: Taking drugs that suppress the immune system, such as those used to prevent rejection of a transplant organ or to treat certain immune diseases, may increase the risk of oral cancer. •Lichen planus: People with a severe case of this illness, which usually causes an itchy rash but sometimes appears as white lines or spots in the mouth and throat, may have a higher risk of oral cancer. Lichen planus usually affects middle-aged people. •Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD): This condition can occur after a stem-cell transplant, in which bone marrow is replaced following cancer occurrence or treatment. The new stem cells may have an immune response against the patient’s own cells, and tissues in the body may be destroyed as a result. GVHD increases the likelihood of oral cancer, which can develop as soon as 2 years later. UNPROVEN RISK FACTORS In recent years, concern has been raised about some products heightening the risk of oral cancer. These concerns are controversial and have not yet been proven in scientific studies. The products some believe to increase cancer risk factors include: Mouthwash: Some studies have shown a link between mouthwash that is high in alcohol content and the risk of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. However, other research has raised doubts about this concern. The frequent use of mouthwash by people who smoke and drink—two confirmed risk factors for oral cancer—makes it difficult to establish a clear link between mouthwash and oral cancer. •Irritation from dentures: Poorly fitting dentures that cause long-term irritation of the mouth lining have also been a point of concern regarding oral cancer risk. This link has not been confirmed in several studies. However, loose dentures may trap substances that are known to cause oral cancer, such as alcohol and tobacco. Individuals who wear dentures should be sure to have their fit checked by a dentist regularly, remove them at night, and clean and rinse them thoroughly each day.
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Hi all, My relative is admitted in oncologist department for bone marrow test. I have few queries regarding this. 1. Is this test only for cancer detection? 2. I visit oncologist ward frequent to meet him. There are other cancer patients. Is there any Contiguous harm to me if I visit that ward? Please suggest asap.

MBBS, M.S. General Surgery, M.R.C.S. England, M.Ch. Surgical Oncology, DNB Surgical Oncology, FEBS Surgical Oncology, DNB General Surgery, MNAMS, FMAS, FIAGES, FAIS, FICS, FEBS Breast Surgery, FACS, Fellowship IFHNOS & MSKCC USA, Fellowship in breast and oncplastic Surgery
Oncologist, Mumbai
Bone marrow biopsy is usually done in a few specific cancers like leukaemia, to know the involvement of the same. Cancer is not contagious Feel free to contact me directly if you want to discuss this further.
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I have taken caberlin .5 mg tablet to stop breastfeeding but now I have severe pain in breast please hep me.

MBBS, M S General Surgery ,
General Surgeon, Chandigarh
Hi you might be developing breastfeeding abscess I would suggest please go and visit a surgeon near by.
1 person found this helpful
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Bladder Cancer And Its Symptoms!

MBBS, D.N.B. (General Surgery), D.N.B. (Genito Urinary Surgery)
Urologist, Mumbai
Bladder Cancer And Its Symptoms!

Bladder cancer can be caused by a variety of factors, which include genetic factors, inheritance, drugs, chemicals, environment related factors and smoking. In fact, smoking tobacco is one of the major causes of bladder cancer around the world. The chemicals present in tobacco can irritate the bladder lining which ultimately leads to bladder cancer. Besides smoking other important environmental factors might be chemotherapy, exposure to chemicals from newspaper, dye, leather, paints industries.

Symptoms of bladder cancer are as follows:

Most often it occurs in people more than 50 years of age. It can present in different ways, but common symptoms being :

  1. Painless hematuria - reddish or brownish colored urine with or without clots Increased frequency of urination Pain while passing urine .
  2. Difficulty in passing urine

Diagnosis:

The diagnosis requires a proper imaging workup including ultrasound, CT scan and urine examinations. Following the initial imaging, a biopsy is required to confirm the diagnosis and stage the disease. This is done by cystoscopy under anesthesia.

Treatment Options:

Treatments for bladder cancer.depend on the stage of cancer. Broadly bladder cancers can be categorised into Non-invasive and Invasive cancers.

  1. For non-invasive cancers: It requires recurrent cystoscopic surveillance and resection. For those with high risk of tumor recurrence or progression, intravesical chemotherapy or immunotherapy might be required.
  2. For invasive cancers the various treatment choices are:
    1. Surgery: For localised tumor which are amenable to resection perhaps surgery is the best possible treatment. This is a major undertaking where in whole of bladder along with accessory organs is removed. The surgeon may offer choices for reconstruction between neobladder (refashioning bladder with patient's gut) or ileal conduit (fashioning a stoma over which bag can be worn to collect urine). Following surgery a regular follow up is required and the prognosis is good.
    2. Chemotherapy: This modality is reserved for patient's where surgery is not possible or they have metastatic disease (disease spread to other body parts).In this method, medications are used to target and destroy cancer cells.
    3. Radiation Therapy: This might be and option for patient's that are not suitable for surgery. Radiation therapy uses gamma rays to destroy cancer cells in the body The key to good prognosis in bladder cancers is early detection timely intervention and good follow up. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Urologist.
2116 people found this helpful

Elevated PSA I am a 75 years old. My PSA last year was 4.03 this year it has elevated to 5.83. This has me stressed and worried. My urologist has recommend I have a biopsy. I have been reading and go ogling about prostate cancer and biopsies. The more I read and learn, the more confused I get. I am 50- to get a.

MS-General Surgery, MBBS
General Surgeon, Hyderabad
Elevated PSA
I am a 75 years old. My PSA last year was 4.03 this year it has elevated to 5.83. This has me stressed a...
Your reading is no substitute for doctors' knowledge and experience. Stop reading and get biopsy done as advised by your urologist. Raised psa is a dangerous sign. Don't ignore it. It could be cancer. Luckily, prostate cancer is a curable disease if detected in time.
1 person found this helpful
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I’m a 23 year old lady. My breasts often seem to be swollen and painful. It looks like lumps and they disappear themselves. I also gain weight even if I don’t eat much. I suspect that I might have thyroid. Also I have regular periods but they last only for two days. Will these problems affect my chance of getting pregnant?

B.H.M.S.
Homeopath, Kolkata
It may happen during menstrual days in many ladies. Please observe closely that swelling of breasts having any time relationship with menses. Eating much will make you fatty is not true at all. Which is needed is regular and proper diet. Periods of 2 days are not unnatural. It lies in normal limit. Hope it will help you solve queries.
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I am 13 year old girl and I have breast lump that gets smaller as my periods end and it also have some small moveable lumps on it my both breasts are lumpy I am very scared the doctor said it's nothing and I searched internet so it scared me more is this okay I am very scared.

MBBS, DNB - General Surgery
General Surgeon, Hyderabad
Many women develop benign lumps called fibroadenomas. They are not cancer. So if your doctor is sure that they are fibroadenomas you don't have to worry at all. But keep getting yourself checked yearly.
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