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Dr. Anand Prasad Balky

Neurologist, Hyderabad

450 at clinic
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Dr. Anand Prasad Balky Neurologist, Hyderabad
450 at clinic
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Anand Prasad Balky
Dr. Anand Prasad Balky is a popular Neurologist in KPHB, Hyderabad. He is currently practising at Ankura Childrens Hospital in KPHB, Hyderabad. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Anand Prasad Balky on has top trusted Neurologists from across India. You will find Neurologists with more than 32 years of experience on You can find Neurologists online in Hyderabad and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.


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Ankura Childrens Hospital

Plot # 55&56, On JNTU - HITEC City Road,KPHB 7th Phase,Kukatpally. Landmark: Near Geethanjali School & Near HITC City Railway Station, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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Aditya Hospital

Ground Floor, 4-1-16, Boggulkunta,, Tilak Road, Landmark: Beside Enrollment Office, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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Now Say - GO Migraine

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Gurgaon

Now say - Go Migraine

Migraine headache is usually associated with one sided throbbing headache, with nausea ( the tendency to vomit), vomiting and sensitivity to light. In a migraine there is excessive stimulation (constriction and sudden dilatation) of brain and blood vessels.


Improper metabolism, suppression of natural urges, anger, jealousy, grief, poor elimination, intake of dry, pungent and salty food, intake of polluted food, mental and physical stress, viewing of tv for long periods, reading with insufficient light, sleeplessness etc.

Origin of a migraine headache
Due to the causative factors, pitta dosha obstructs the flow of Vata dosha in the brain, causing throbbing pain.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on consult now.


  • Sneha nasya - instillation of medicated oils can be carried to the nostrils. Shadbindu tailam or anu tailam yield significant benefits in this condition.
  • Apply a paste of freshly ground clay or freshly ground sandalwood to the forehead, let dry, rub off by hand and wash.
  • Sugar powder 16 parts, vamshalochana 8 parts, pippali (long pepper) 4 parts, ela (cardamom) 2 parts, cinnamon - 1 part. Make fine powder and mix it, keep in tight moisture-free container. Take half teaspoon thrice daily with honey.
  • Mix one-forth teaspoon of clove powder with 1 teaspoon of cinnamon oil. Apply this paste on the affected area for 20-30 minutes.
  • Add chamomile powder to 1 cup of boiling water. Transfer the liquid to a cup. Drink when hot. It gives fast relief from a migraine.
  • Grind 10-12 grains of black pepper and 10-12 grains of rice with water to make it a paste. Apply this paste on the affected area of the head for 15-20 minutes.
  • Take half a glass of carrot juice. Add half a glass of spinach juice. Mix well. Drink this juice to cure the migraine.
  • Practicing meditation is highly recommended.


  • Apple, mango, papaya, cheeku, guava.
  • Salad 1hr before lunch, 1hr before dinner.
  • Buttermilk, boiled rice sauted with cinnamon, cumin seeds, and garlic or asafetida are good in the daytime.
  • Have warm and easily digestible foods, boiled and steamed vegetables, soups, vegetable juices, porridge, brown rice and whole-wheat flour.
  • Avoid yogurt especially at night. 
4 people found this helpful

I suffer from head aches more often. May be because of tension or migraine. Doctors gave me dolo and stemtill. Sometimes pain reduces and sometimes not. Once I get severe head aches then drugs don't help me. Which is the best medicine for head aches and how to prevent it.

General Physician, Cuttack
I suffer from head aches more often. May be because of tension or migraine. Doctors gave me dolo and stemtill. Someti...
If you have recurrent attack of headache1. It could be a tension headache due to inadequate sleep stress and strain, low bp/high bp, migraine, prolonged use of cell phone/computer, chronic anaemia, refractive error, chronic sinusitis, organic brain lesion 2. Avoid stress, physical and mental exertion, avoid pronged use of cell phone 3. Go for regular exercise 4. Practice yoga, meditation and deep breathing exercise to calm your mind, control your emotion and relieve stress 5. Check for refractive error, sinusitis hemoglobin, bp 6. Consult neurologist to rule out other causes of headache 7. Revert back.
1 person found this helpful
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My mother is suffering from insomnia and some time she have headache and gas problem in stomach then what is the guidelines for solution of these disease.

Ayurveda, Ambala
My mother is suffering from insomnia and some time she have headache and gas problem in stomach then what is the guid...
Dear, These are Causes of lack of sleep : • stress • Anxiety • Depression • Pain • irregular schedule of sleep such as sleeping during day time & working during nights. • Excess intake of alcohol , caffeine (tea, coffee) • Due to drugs , Due to high blood pressure . • Aging Due to lack of sleep there are many complications arise such as lack of concentration ,irritability, fatigue . So these are some instructions & methods for good sleep : • Frequent oil massage of head with oil relax your mind and enhances sleep .You can also do foot massage daily it destress you . • Do not take stress . Do meditation and long breathing pranayams to relax the mind. • Do not take caffeine, tea & alcohol in excess and these are stimulant ,(activate) your brain result in lack of sleep. • Avoid drinking alcohol & smoking. • Avoid sleep during day time as it makes it harder to fall asleep at night. •Try to sleep early at night . Do not think during sleep . Do exercise and long walk daily . • Avoid to take sleeping pills because these are habit forming drugs and these drugs disturb your normal sleep pattern. • Take a bowl of curd daily in afternoon and one glass of milk at night daily .
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I feel jerk in whole body for milliseconds, I consult a doctor he said there is a small nerve blockage in brian can you help it out what is the problem?

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Patna
Dear jerking of whole body may be due to epileptic fits. You should get eeg & mri brain done. If jerking is associated with loss of awareness and consciousness then you must consult a neurologist immediately. Each such episode is dangerous and it causes harm to brain. All the best.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello, I want to know about my father. He is 62 years old. in 2011 he was attached with brain stroke. Now he is taking tablet" telvas am "for controlling bp. But now a days bp is 103/61. So can you please tell me is it harmful for him in future or not? Thanks,

MBBS, MD-General Medicine, DM - Cardiology
Cardiologist, Secunderabad
I want to know about my father. He is 62 years old. in 2011 he was attached with brain stroke. Now he is takin...
Hi, brain stroke patients have poor autoregulation mechanism. So it's necessary to keep the BP in a range. Although controlling high BP is important, keeping at too low may be harmful also. I will be comfortable if it's in a range of 110 to 130 systolic. You may consult your doctor to adjust his medication accordingly.
8 people found this helpful
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Sir I am also suffering from migraine so please give me best medication to get rid of severe headache during migraine.

General Physician, Cuttack
1.Take Paracetamol 500mg one Tablet sos after food up to a maximum of three tablets daily at the time of attack, apply ice pack, massage scalp/temple 2.Drink plenty of water and take rest. 3.. Avoid stress, anxiety, depression, agitation,exposure to loud noise, bright light,strong smell inadequate sleep, since it precipitates migraine attack 4.Avoid salted /processed food, aged cheese, excess tea/coffee/alcoho(red wine)/caffeinated beveragesl.Don’t skip/postpone your meal,avoid hunger since it triggers the attack 5. Go for regular exercise,reduce weight if over weight 6. practice yoga, meditation, deep breathing exercise to calm your mind, control your emotion and relieve you from stress 7. If You have chronic migraine, you have to take migraine prophylaxis like propranolol after consulting physician
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Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia

Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

3 people found this helpful

My grandfather is 70 and he's got 3 seizures in last 1 year. Last one was one week ago and while going to hospital he had 2 fractures in his vertebrae and his shoulder too had a fracture. What should be done to cure him. And how much time to cure him?

Hand Surgery, M.S. (Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Ahmedabad
Dear lybrate-user you grand pa needs detailed evaluation by a neurophysician and has to be treated on long term basis with regular check up.
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