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Dr. Vaishnavi

Cardiologist, Chennai

500 at clinic
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Dr. Vaishnavi Cardiologist, Chennai
500 at clinic
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To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Vaishnavi
Dr. Vaishnavi is a trusted Cardiologist in Mogappair, Chennai. You can consult Dr. Vaishnavi at Frontier Lifeline Pvt Ltd in Mogappair, Chennai. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Vaishnavi on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Cardiologists in India. You will find Cardiologists with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Cardiologists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English

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Frontier Lifeline Pvt Ltd

R 30 C, Ambattur Industrial Estate Road, Mogappair, Landmark: Opp to Bharath Petrol Pump & Next To Chennai Public School, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
500 at clinic
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I have hormonal imbalance. Though this am I suffering from low bp, and next problem is I am putting weight over all. What can I do, please help me?

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine Specialist, Faridabad
Birth control medicine can cause of over weight. Hormonal imbalance cause many problems. Do test thyroid profile,
2 people found this helpful
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I am 50 years old have a heart problem doctors give me suggestion to go stunt but I didn't is it some problem.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath, Patna
I am 50 years old have a heart problem doctors give me suggestion to go stunt but I didn't is it some problem.
Its a case of blcked coronary artry take crategus ox q arjuna q mixe both together, tk 10 drps, thrice/day tk mornibg walk 4 an hr.
10 people found this helpful
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I am suffering from muscle cramps. Specially abdomen and left chest. First I thought it is due to any cardiac problem but my all test came normal. Lft, tmt, ecg, xray, electrolyte test all came normal. Chest cramp is really bad accompanied by nausea and dizziness sometimes. I am working on reducing my body weight.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, DM - Cardiology, Fellowship in EP
Cardiologist, Delhi
I am suffering from muscle cramps. Specially abdomen and left chest. First I thought it is due to any cardiac problem...
To reduce weight you must reduce blood insulin levels, discuss on phone, it is not very difficult to loose weight without getting cramps and other pains.
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I have cough and chest pain. I also having a headache. Suggest me some ways to overcome this problem.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
I have cough and chest pain. I also having a headache. Suggest me some ways to overcome this problem.
Take tablet paracetamol 500mg eight hourly till symptomatic and For dry cough I will suggest you to take syp Ascoril-Dplus 2.5ml eight hourly as and when required
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What we have to do if we have a low blood pressure. Blood pressure reading is 60/110.

Cardiologist, Faridabad
What we have to do if we have a low blood pressure. Blood pressure reading is 60/110.
110 /60 is normal value Dnt do anything for this If u felt dizziness then check bp n take salt water
1 person found this helpful
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I am suffering from hypertension shall I see nephrologist before starting any medicine. It's my family history to have hypertension.

MBBS, Dip.Cardiology, Fellowship in Clinical Cardiology(FICC), Fellowship in Echocardiology
Cardiologist, Ghaziabad
I am suffering from hypertension shall I see nephrologist before starting any medicine. It's my family history to hav...
You need to understand about high blood pressure.  Normal range of blood pressure is between 90/60 to 140/90, anything above or below is is abnormal. Many factors can affect blood pressure, including: 1) The amount of water and salt you have in your body 2) The condition of your kidneys, nervous system, or blood vessels 3) Your hormone levels 4) your lifestyle - smoking, drinking, exercise  You are more likely to be told your blood pressure is too high as you get older. This is because your blood vessels become stiffer as you age. When that happens, your blood pressure goes up. High blood pressure increases your chance of having a stroke, heart attack, heart failure, kidney disease, or early death. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. DASH lowers high blood pressure and improves levels of cholesterol. This reduces your risk of getting heart disease. The DASH Diet Emphasizes vegetables, fruits, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products. Includes whole grains, fish, poultry, beans, seeds, nuts, and vegetable oils. Limits sodium, sweets, sugary beverages, and red meats. Along with DASH, other lifestyle changes can help lower your blood pressure. They include staying at a healthy weight, exercising, and not smoking. My advice to you would be 1) Keep a BP daily record for at least one week 2) Basic tests should be one to rule out cardiac / kidney issues 3) unless any recent evaluation has been done I would advice these test ECG ECHO Lipid Profile TSH KFT  Renal doppler  Get back to me with a detailed history and  old / new records for a better individualized advice.
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Which food should be eaten while bypass surgery have made and which food should be avoided.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Which food should be eaten while bypass surgery have made and which food should be avoided.
few tips on diet - say no to maida items like toast , khaari ,naan ,white bread . can drink tea but without sugar and say no to Buffalo milk and can drink cows milk , can eat brown bread , can eat sprout’s , can eat green vegetables, can eat chappati ,bajra ka rotla can eat one katori of rice twice a day with dal and to avoid farsan food items and can eat fruits and say no to coconut water
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Blood-Sugar Control

B.H.M.S, Diploma in Diet and Nutrition
Homeopath, Lucknow
Blood-Sugar Control

Your Take-charge Tool Kit

Blood-sugar control

Complications of diabetes, such as cardiovascular problems, poor vision, kidney disease, and nerve damage, were once thought to be inevitable no matter how hard you tried to manage erratic swings in blood sugar the core problem of diabetes. But that thinking is no longer acceptable. Several major studies from around the world have shown that if you bring blood sugar into a normal range with drugs, insulin,  diet  exercise, or some combination of these ,you can cut your risk of complication by anywhere from one  third to three quarters. If you’re diagnosed before you develop complications’ it’s possible

To sidestep diabetes-related health problems completely sometime with lifestyle changes alone. Meanwhile, technoleogy for monitoring your own blood sugar continues to improve and  is now remarkably convenient and relatively pain-free.

Lifestyle

Diet and exercise are powerful tools for lowering blood sugar so powerful, in fact, insulin. And using these “power” tools is easier than ever before. Recent research into how foods affect blood sugar has shown that your diet need not be as restrictive as experts once believed. It can include virtually any food you like, as long as you watch your calorie intake. On the exercise side, it turns out that your workouts don’t have to be as vigorous as once thought. Even short health.

Drugs

Earlier generations of diabetes medications have been bolstered by a growing roster of newer drugs that tackle the disease in a variety of ways. In many cases, you can combine these drugs to take advantage of their different modes of operation. The fact that there are also several varieties of insulin (which regulates the body’s use of blood sugar) gives you more flexibility in finding a regimen that matches your lifestyle.

Do you Have Diabetes?

Its human nature not to look for problems if they haven’t already found you which explains why between one third and one half of people with diabetes don’t know they have it.

According to the American College of Endocrinology, half of all people who finally go to their doctor to be tested have already developed some degree of complications. How can you recognize when diabetes is at your door? There are three fundamental ways.

Figure your risk factors.

The first thing to look at is whether any element of your background makes you more likely than the general population to develop diabetes.  Among the most important factors to evaluate are:

 

Family history

If anyone in your immediate family a parent, sibling, or grandparent has had diabetes, you have a higher chance of developing the disease yourself. The extent of the risk depends on the type of diabetes and how closely related you are to the person who has it (the risk is highest among identical twins).

Ethnic group

The most common type of diabetes (called type 2) is most prevalent in African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native  Americans, and Asian Americans. The other major form is most prevalent in Caucasians, especially those with backgrounds in northern European regions, such as Scandinavia.

Weight

Being overweight significantly raises your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. That makes it one of the most important risk factors because it’s one you can control.

Age

Type 1 usually occurs in children or teens (it’s rarely diagnosed after age 30). Type 2 generally develops after age 40, although it’s becoming more common in younger people.

Keep a sharp eye for symptoms

While the signs of diabetes can be subtle at first, they’re not impossible to pick up on. The longer diabetes progressed, the more likely symptoms are to become obvious and troublesome. The hallmarks of diabetes are:

  • Excessive thirst

 

  • Increased appetite

 

 

 

  • Blurred vision

 

  • Frequent infections

 

 

 

Get tested

Tests for diabetes are easy they involve nothing more painful than a finger prick to draw a drop of your blood (although some tests require that you prepare by fasting ahead of time). It’s best to see a doctor for a full evaluation if your want to nail down your diagnosis: blood screenings at health fairs or malls provide less accurate results than those your doctor can give you. If your results fall short of a diagnosis but your background suggest you’re at risk, schedule a return visit at least every year to make sure nothing’ changed.

What you can expect

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor will need to cover a lot ground in a short time. In fact. In fact, he’ll want to know virtually everything about you: eating patterns, weight history, blood pressure, medications you’re taking, whether you smoke or drink, how satisfying you find sex, how many kids you’ve had, any family history of heart disease, and any treatment you’ve received for other problems, including endocrine and eating disorders. If you’re a woman, you’ll woman, you’ll even be asked about your children’s development. Your doctor isn’t prying. All of this information has a bearing on your condition and the management program you’ll eventually follow.

Your doctor will also want to do a thorough physical exam, including a cardiac workup that may involve an electrocardiogram (which records the heart’s electrical activity) and a careful look at your mouth, feet, eye, abdomen, skin, and thyroid gland. You’ll have a battery of tests, including a blood-lipid test for cholesterol (among other things) and at least two different blood-sugar tests one that shows what your blood sugar is right now and the other, what it has averaged for the past two to three month.

Where Do you Stand?

Your doctor looks at a lot of variables when deciding how to treat your diabetes, but he’ll  pay special attention to one in particular: your blood-sugar readings. If your blood sugar is sky-high in your initial assessment, you may go straight to drug and insulin therapy until your numbers are brought down. If you have type 2 diabetes, once your blood sugar has stabilized and you begin making lifestyle changes, you may be able to go off insulin and other medications.

One of the numbers your doctor will zero in on is your fasting blood-glucose level, a key test of blood sugar. While other tests also need to be considered and each case must be managed individually, you can roughly anticipate your options depending on what your fasting blood-glucose levels are (numbers are expressed as milligrams per deciliter). As a general guideline:

  • If fasting blood glucose is between 110 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl, you have prediabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance), a condition in which elevated blood sugar levels significantly raise the risk of developing diabetes. You’ll be advised to start eating a healthier diet and to get more exercise, but you’re unlikely to get a prescription for drugs or insulin.

 

  • If fasting blood glucose is 126 mg/dl to around 140 or 150 mg/dl. You have full-blown diabetes, but you’ll probably still be able to control your blood sugar with diet and exercise, depending on your condition and results from other tests.

 

  • Once fasting blood glucose exceeds 150 mg/dl and ranges to 200 mg/dl, it’s likely you’ll need drugs in addition to diet and exercise. You may also need occasional doses of insulin for better control at certain times of the day (after meals, for example) when blood sugar tends to be higher.

 

  • When fasting  blood glucose goes above 200, you may need drugs or 24-hour insulin coverage-possibly both along with lifestyle changes.

 

FASTING BLOOD-GLUCOSE LEVELS AND LIKELY TREATMENT

Prediabetes             -            110-125                -                      Diet Exercise

Diabetes                   -            126-140                -                      Diet Exercise

Diabetes                   -            150-200                -     Diet Exercise Drugs occasional insulin

Diabetes                   -             200+                     -    Diet Exercise Drugs or 24-hour insulin coverage

type diabetes
2 people found this helpful

Sternal pain with no cardiac and respiratory problems, did workout but not now, what could be the reason,

MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
Sternal pain with no cardiac and respiratory problems, did workout but not now, what could be the reason,
Bhujang Asana – Lie flat on your stomach, keeping the palms out, bend the neck backward, take a deep breath and while holding it for 6 seconds, raise the chest up. Release breath and relax your body. Repeat the exercise 15 times twice daily.
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What is the symptoms of heart related problems? What is the first treatment at home.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
What is the symptoms of heart related problems? What is the first treatment at home.
You can save time during a cardiac emergency by planning ahead. Here are some ways to prepare for a heart attack and possibly increase your chances of survival. 1. Know the warning signs Not everyone who has a heart attack experiences the same symptoms, and some people have no symptoms at all. There are, however, some common ones you should know: Chest discomfort (pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain) Pain radiating to the arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach Shortness of breath Other symptoms, for example, sweating, nausea, vomiting or lightheadedness 2. Know what to do If you experience symptoms of a heart attack: Call 911 immediately. Because emergency personnel can begin treatment before you reach the hospital, transport to the hospital in an ambulance is the best way to receive prompt care. If calling 911 is not possible, have someone drive you to the hospital. Do not drive yourself to the hospital unless you have absolutely no other alternative. While waiting for help to arrive, chew a regular-dose aspirin to help prevent blood clots. Take with a glass of water. If you have been prescribed nitroglycerin tablets or spray for angina, take one to three doses to see whether symptoms are relieved. Lie down, breathe deeply and slowly, and try to stay calm. 3. Develop an action plan If you are at high risk for a heart attack, consider some of the following suggestions: Think what you would do if you had a heart attack in various situations, such as at home or while driving. Decide who would take care of any dependents. Make sure these backup people are willing to help out in an emergency. Write down a list of medications you are currently taking, medications you are allergic to, your doctors' phone numbers (both during and after office hours) and contact information for a friend or relative. Keep copies of this information in several places, such as at home, at work, in your car and in your wallet or purse. Give instructions to your family and friends. Tell them the warning signs of a heart attack and what to do if you experience these signs. Encourage them to take a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) class so that they can provide assistance if your breathing or heart stops before the ambulance arrives. Keep a bottle of aspirin in your home, car, office and toiletry bag. Always have your cell phone with you in case you need to call for help. You can save time during a cardiac emergency by planning ahead. Here are some ways to prepare for a heart attack and possibly increase your chances of survival. 1. Know the warning signs Not everyone who has a heart attack experiences the same symptoms, and some people have no symptoms at all. There are, however, some common ones you should know: Chest discomfort (pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain) Pain radiating to the arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach Shortness of breath Other symptoms, for example, sweating, nausea, vomiting or lightheadedness 2. Know what to do If you experience symptoms of a heart attack: Call 911 immediately. Because emergency personnel can begin treatment before you reach the hospital, transport to the hospital in an ambulance is the best way to receive prompt care. If calling 911 is not possible, have someone drive you to the hospital. Do not drive yourself to the hospital unless you have absolutely no other alternative. While waiting for help to arrive, chew a regular-dose aspirin to help prevent blood clots. Take with a glass of water. If you have been prescribed nitroglycerin tablets or spray for angina, take one to three doses to see whether symptoms are relieved. Lie down, breathe deeply and slowly, and try to stay calm. 3. Develop an action plan If you are at high risk for a heart attack, consider some of the following suggestions: Think what you would do if you had a heart attack in various situations, such as at home or while driving. Decide who would take care of any dependents. Make sure these backup people are willing to help out in an emergency. Write down a list of medications you are currently taking, medications you are allergic to, your doctors' phone numbers (both during and after office hours) and contact information for a friend or relative. Keep copies of this information in several places, such as at home, at work, in your car and in your wallet or purse. Give instructions to your family and friends. Tell them the warning signs of a heart attack and what to do if you experience these signs. Encourage them to take a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) class so that they can provide assistance if your breathing or heart stops before the ambulance arrives. Keep a bottle of aspirin in your home, car, office and toiletry bag. Always have your cell phone with you in case you need to call for help.
2 people found this helpful
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