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Dt. Nivedita Singh

Dietitian/Nutritionist, Bangalore

250 at clinic
Dt. Nivedita Singh Dietitian/Nutritionist, Bangalore
250 at clinic
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My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
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Dt. Nivedita Singh is an experienced Dietitian/Nutritionist in Whitefield, Bangalore. She is currently associated with NuviLife in Whitefield, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dt. Nivedita Singh on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Dietitian/Nutritionists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Dietitian/Nutritionists with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dietitian/Nutritionists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Professional Memberships
Indian Dietetic Association

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205 Parth Orchids Apartment,Kadugodi. Landmark: Opp Whitefield Railway StationBangalore Get Directions
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I want to reduce my weight. Is there any side effect for using weight reducing tablets?

BHMS
Homeopath, Chennai
Tips to lose weight faster: 1. Eat a high-protein breakfast. 2avoid sugary drinks and fruit juice. 3. Drink water a half hour before meals. 4. Choose weight loss-friendly foods (more vegetables and fruits) 5. Eat soluble fiber. 6. Eat mostly whole, unprocessed foods. 7. Eat your food slowly. 8. Sleep 7-8 hours 9. Go for regular exercise constitutional homoeopathic treatment will give you best results.
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Want diet plan for weight loss after c-section delivery. My baby is taking feed of mine and 3 times feeder in a day.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Ludhiana
Patience is the key. It took nine months for your tummy muscles to stretch to accommodate a full-term baby. So it makes sense that it can take that long, or longer, to tighten up again. The speed and degree of this tightening up depends on a few factors, including: • What shape and size you were before you conceived your baby. • How much weight you gained during pregnancy. • How active you are. • Something you can't do anything about: your genes. You may find it easier to shed the weight if: • You gained less than 13.6kg and exercised regularly during pregnancy. • You breastfeed. • This is your first baby. NOTE you shouldn't aim to be back to your pre-pregnancy weight until about six months after your baby's birth. How can you safely lose weight to help your belly look better? Breastfeeding may help, especially in the early months after giving birth. If you breastfeed, you'll burn extra calories to make milk – about 500 calories a day. You may lose your pregnancy weight more quickly than mums who bottle-feed their babies. Breastfeeding also triggers contractions that help to shrink your womb, making it a workout for your whole body. However, if you eat more than you burn off, you will put on weight, even if you breastfeed. It's fine to lose weight while you are breastfeeding. Your body is very efficient at making milk, and losing up to 1kg a week shouldn't affect the amount of milk you make. However, if you have a newborn to look after, you'll need plenty of energy. Trying to lose weight too soon after giving birth may delay your recovery and make you feel even more tired. It’s especially important not to attempt a very low-calorie diet. So try to wait until you've had your postnatal check before start trying to lose weight. Eating healthily, combined with gentle exercise, will help you to get in shape. The following general guidelines will help you to achieve and maintain a healthy weight: • Make time for breakfast. • Eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. • Include plenty of fibre-rich foods, such as oats, beans, lentils, grains and seeds, in your diet. • Include a starchy food such as bread, rice, pasta (preferably wholegrain varieties for added fibre) or potatoes in each meal. • Go easy on high-fat and high-sugar foods, such as biscuits and cakes. • Watch your portions at mealtimes and the number and type of snacks you eat between meals. There's no right answer about how many calories a day you should have. The amount you need to eat depends on your weight and how active you are. What else can you do to help regain your pre-pregnancy belly? Exercise can help to tone stomach muscles and burn calories. If you exercised right up until the end of your pregnancy, you can do some light exercise and stretching from the start. If you stopped exercising during your pregnancy or are a newcomer to fitness, it is better to start exercising more slowly. Fitness aside, all new mums can begin pelvic floor exercises and work on gently toning up lower tummy muscles as soon as they feel ready. This may help you to get back to your pre-pregnancy shape and help to flatten your tummy. When you feel up to it, take your baby out for walks in his pushchair. Getting out and about will help to lift your mood and exercise your body gently. You may find there are pushchair workouts with other new mums in your local park.
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I am having weakness issues as whenever I walk or do little exercise I get tired and get sweating. BP is normal. please SUGGEST.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi,to overcome this weakness, take Alfavena malt, 2 tsf, twice daily for 1 month. BC no. 27, 5 tabs twice daily. Drink plenty of water. Eat a well balanced nutritious diet. Take Sound sleep of 7-8 hours.
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I am too lazy. What to do for getting off this laziness and what should I eat to be active

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
You can feel lazy due to lack of essential nutrients, not getting enough sleep, a weak immune system, excessive drinking, skipping meals, emotional stress, and too much physical labor. Persistent weakness can be caused by health problems like anemia, arthritis, hypothyroidism, a sleep disorder, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, diabetes and heart disease. In these cases, it is very important to find out the exact cause behind your weakness. To feel energetic and refreshed in life, you must exercise daily for at least 30 minutes, maintain your ideal body weight, follow a good diet, sleep properly, drink water throughout the day to keep your body hydrated, avoid alcohol and stop smoking if you do.
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Sir my dad age is 70 years. And his weight is 89 kg. How we reduce his weight please explain.

MD-Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Sexologist, Haldwani
Hello lybrate user, weight in this age can be reduced by the help of ayurvedic medicines and diet corrections. A) advice him to take evening food before 7 pm. B) day sleep should be avoided. C) non veg diet and fast foods must be avoided. D) go for yoga / jogging in the evening.
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Hi I hve more weight I want to less my weight how can I have diet plan I want to go walking?

Vaidya Visharad
Ayurveda, Narnaul
It would be better for you to eat steam cooked or boiled food in order to prevent the risk of adding on the weight. • Make sure that you only steam cooks all your veggies and do not fry them when you are cooking. • You can also consume boiled chicken or fish every day, but make sure that you should never eat fried chicken or other meat.
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Drinking water in plastic bottles is harmful. Then what about Kent, puri filters which are made of plastic and water stored in it for more than hours. Kindly suggest.

PGD IN ULTRAASONOGRAPHY, Non invasive cardiology course, MD - Medicine, MBBS
General Physician, Narnaul
Probably. But it depends on the type of plastic the bottle is made from. And in an effort to be more healthy, many of us make a point of carrying water bottles with us everywhere we go. But are our water bottles a health issue? Especially those made from plastic? Generally they are safe, says Michael Moore, Emeritus Professor of Toxicology at the University of Queensland, but it depends on the kind of plastic the bottle is made of. Most plastics are made of long chains of hydrocarbon molecules, built from simpler building blocks called monomers. Some plastics then have chemicals added to give them a characteristic such as flexibility or colour. Buying bottled water The 'single use' water bottles that you typically buy at milk bars, service stations and the like are usually made from polyethylene terephthalate (abbreviated to PET or PETE), an inexpensive and lightweight plastic. Its recycling code (the number in the centre of the triangle of arrows found on most plastics) is 1. "PET is not one of the plastics that one would think has a propensity to cause a problem, says Moore. Moore agrees with the US FDA, which says that PET bottles are safe for use and reuse so long as they are washed properly with detergent and water to remove bacteria. The safety of using PET bottles was questioned after a student research project hit the headlines. The 2001 study found traces of a phthalate — a potentially harmful 'plasticiser' used to make some plastics more flexible — in water from PET bottles, but the research hadn't been verified. Moore says PET has never contained phthalates and the public's association between the two could be based on the plastic's name. And while some preliminary studies have suggested water from PET bottles can contain as-yet-unidentified substances with 'oestrogenic' properties (which disrupt the body's normal hormone regulation), Moore says no rigorous scientific review has backed these. A substance called antimony is used in PET production and it can leach into the water in PET bottles. However, this doesn't pose much of a risk, says Moore. "Antimony is not in the same league as lead or mercury toxicologically so the likelihood of harm is low, says Moore. Using your own bottle But what if you've decided not to buy bottled water, but to use a refillable water bottle to cut down on the plastic sent to landfill? Polycarbonate has been commonly used to make the sturdy reusable water bottles that many of us use. Polycarbonate is one of the plastics classed as 'other' in the recycling scheme. It has a recycling code of 7, but not all bottles stamped with a 7 are made from polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is made of a monomer called bisphenol A (BPA). As the plastic breaks down over time, BPA is released into the water held in polycarbonate bottles, particularly when the bottle is heated or repeatedly washed. "If you have a bottle made of polycarbonate, on first use there probably isn't much depolymerisation but as you use it again and again — especially if things are warm or hot — then there's a high likelihood that there will be a breakdown of the plastic to release the monomer, says Moore. But just because there is some BPA in the water, it doesn't necessarily mean it's dangerous, says Moore. Research in animals has found BPA can cause a range of conditions — such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and reproductive and developmental disorders. Some studies suggest that young animals metabolise BPA less efficiently than adults. "But there's nothing much in the way of identified effects in humans — virtually all of the effects have been established in relatively higher levels of exposure in animal models. The level of exposure is probably not sufficient to cause these effects [in people]. But people who are feeding young children are saying 'I'd rather not take the chance' which is fair enough. It's likely that soon we won't need to make these choices ourselves, says Moore. Even though most national food safety agencies, including Australia's FSANZ, say that the level of exposure to BPA is too low to be dangerous, food and drink companies are moving away from polycarbonate because of the bad press. However, other agencies, such as the US National Toxicology Program, are worried enough to be carrying out reviews and the World Health Organisation is holding a meeting next month to review all the scientific evidence. "There is a lot of ongoing work to look at the effects of this compound to see whether this genuinely represents a big issue. The position at present is that it doesn't constitute a huge issue, says Moore. "In effect I would expect that in the very near future various agencies will make changes to the tolerable daily intake of BPA, he adds. The internationally agreed Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for BPA is currently 0.05 mg per kilogram of body weight per day. One plastic that can be undoubtedly dangerous for making water bottles is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which has a recycling code of 3. PVC often has phthalates added to make it flexible — though you can't tell this by looking at the recycling code. Thankfully, PVC is not often used to make water bottles. Choosing a bottle If you want to err on the side of caution, Moore suggests you avoid drinks bottles that have the recycling codes of 3 or 7, particularly for children. The best bottles to use and reuse are those with the recycling codes 2, 4 and 5. 2 and 4 are made from polyethylene and 5 is made from polypropylene. "There's absolutely nothing in polyethylene or polypropylene that could be classified as dangerous" says Moore. But these bottles are more expensive to make, so while they are likely to be found more and more in reusable bottles, PET is likely to be the plastic of choice for single-use bottles for a while to come. You can also check that reusuable bottles say they are 'BPA-free' as some bottles may be made of number 5 plastic but use polycarbonate linings or mouthpieces. Another rule of thumb is to use clear plastic rather than coloured or opaque because they eliminate small potential risks from colouring agents added to the plastic, says Moore. And while stainless steel or aluminium bottles are often considered a safe bet, these still have some issues, says Moore. Stainless steel can corrode a little over time and while the released iron won't harm you, it'll add an unpleasant taste to your water. Aluminium can also corrode and release aluminium salts into the water. One way of stopping this is to use a plastic liner, which takes you to square one. Glass is a good, but often impractical. "In the end you've got to balance all the issues. I would think that many bottles are safe to use, even PET ones. The only one I would advise against are PVC and polycarbonate, concludes Moore. And in an effort to be more healthy, many of us make a point of carrying water bottles with us everywhere we go. But are our water bottles a health issue? Especially those made from plastic? Generally they are safe, says Michael Moore, Emeritus Professor of Toxicology at the University of Queensland, but it depends on the kind of plastic the bottle is made of. Most plastics are made of long chains of hydrocarbon molecules, built from simpler building blocks called monomers. Some plastics then have chemicals added to give them a characteristic such as flexibility or colour. Buying bottled water The 'single use' water bottles that you typically buy at milk bars, service stations and the like are usually made from polyethylene terephthalate (abbreviated to PET or PETE), an inexpensive and lightweight plastic. Its recycling code (the number in the centre of the triangle of arrows found on most plastics) is 1. "PET is not one of the plastics that one would think has a propensity to cause a problem, says Moore. Moore agrees with the US FDA, which says that PET bottles are safe for use and reuse so long as they are washed properly with detergent and water to remove bacteria. The safety of using PET bottles was questioned after a student research project hit the headlines. The 2001 study found traces of a phthalate — a potentially harmful 'plasticiser' used to make some plastics more flexible — in water from PET bottles, but the research hadn't been verified. Moore says PET has never contained phthalates and the public's association between the two could be based on the plastic's name. And while some preliminary studies have suggested water from PET bottles can contain as-yet-unidentified substances with 'oestrogenic' properties (which disrupt the body's normal hormone regulation), Moore says no rigorous scientific review has backed these. A substance called antimony is used in PET production and it can leach into the water in PET bottles. However, this doesn't pose much of a risk, says Moore. "Antimony is not in the same league as lead or mercury toxicologically so the likelihood of harm is low, says Moore. Using your own bottle But what if you've decided not to buy bottled water, but to use a refillable water bottle to cut down on the plastic sent to landfill? Polycarbonate has been commonly used to make the sturdy reusable water bottles that many of us use. Polycarbonate is one of the plastics classed as 'other' in the recycling scheme. It has a recycling code of 7, but not all bottles stamped with a 7 are made from polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is made of a monomer called bisphenol A (BPA). As the plastic breaks down over time, BPA is released into the water held in polycarbonate bottles, particularly when the bottle is heated or repeatedly washed. "If you have a bottle made of polycarbonate, on first use there probably isn't much depolymerisation but as you use it again and again — especially if things are warm or hot — then there's a high likelihood that there will be a breakdown of the plastic to release the monomer, says Moore. But just because there is some BPA in the water, it doesn't necessarily mean it's dangerous, says Moore. Research in animals has found BPA can cause a range of conditions — such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and reproductive and developmental disorders. Some studies suggest that young animals metabolise BPA less efficiently than adults. "But there's nothing much in the way of identified effects in humans — virtually all of the effects have been established in relatively higher levels of exposure in animal models. The level of exposure is probably not sufficient to cause these effects [in people]. But people who are feeding young children are saying 'I'd rather not take the chance' which is fair enough. It's likely that soon we won't need to make these choices ourselves, says Moore. Even though most national food safety agencies, including Australia's FSANZ, say that the level of exposure to BPA is too low to be dangerous, food and drink companies are moving away from polycarbonate because of the bad press. However, other agencies, such as the US National Toxicology Program, are worried enough to be carrying out reviews and the World Health Organisation is holding a meeting next month to review all the scientific evidence. "There is a lot of ongoing work to look at the effects of this compound to see whether this genuinely represents a big issue. The position at present is that it doesn't constitute a huge issue, says Moore. "In effect I would expect that in the very near future various agencies will make changes to the tolerable daily intake of BPA, he adds. The internationally agreed Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for BPA is currently 0.05 mg per kilogram of body weight per day. One plastic that can be undoubtedly dangerous for making water bottles is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which has a recycling code of 3. PVC often has phthalates added to make it flexible — though you can't tell this by looking at the recycling code. Thankfully, PVC is not often used to make water bottles. Choosing a bottle If you want to err on the side of caution, Moore suggests you avoid drinks bottles that have the recycling codes of 3 or 7, particularly for children. The best bottles to use and reuse are those with the recycling codes 2, 4 and 5. 2 and 4 are made from polyethylene and 5 is made from polypropylene. "There's absolutely nothing in polyethylene or polypropylene that could be classified as dangerous" says Moore. But these bottles are more expensive to make, so while they are likely to be found more and more in reusable bottles, PET is likely to be the plastic of choice for single-use bottles for a while to come. You can also check that reusuable bottles say they are 'BPA-free' as some bottles may be made of number 5 plastic but use polycarbonate linings or mouthpieces. Another rule of thumb is to use clear plastic rather than coloured or opaque because they eliminate small potential risks from colouring agents added to the plastic, says Moore. And while stainless steel or aluminium bottles are often considered a safe bet, these still have some issues, says Moore. Stainless steel can corrode a little over time and while the released iron won't harm you, it'll add an unpleasant taste to your water. Aluminium can also corrode and release aluminium salts into the water. One way of stopping this is to use a plastic liner, which takes you to square one. Glass is a good, but often impractical. "In the end you've got to balance all the issues. I would think that many bottles are safe to use, even PET ones. The only one I would advise against are PVC and polycarbonate, concludes Moore. The Best Water Filter Options What’s In Your Water? If you are drinking tap water, the answer to that question is 300+ chemicals and pollutants, according to research from the Environmental Working Group. Among these contaminants are: Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs) such as pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals. These chemicals are found in most municipal water sources and even in well and other sources due to agricultural run-off and contamination. Research links certain VOCs to damage in the reproductive system, liver, kidneys and more. Heavy Metals like lead and mercury are found in some water sources and have been linked to any health problems. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals are chemicals that may mimic or interfere with the normal hormones in the body and these chemicals are being found in increasing amounts in the water supply. From this testimony before a congressional committee on the issue: “Over the past fifty years, researchers observed increases in endocrine-sensitive health outcomes. Breast and prostatic cancer incidence increased between 1969 and 1986 ; there was a four-fold increase in ectopic pregnancies (development of the fertilized egg outside of the uterus) in the U.S. Between 1970 and 1987 ; the incidence of cryptorchidism (undescended testicles) doubled in the U.K. Between 1960 and the mid 1980s ; and there was an approximately 42% decrease in sperm count worldwide between 1940 and 1990 .” These chemicals are known to affect animals when they enter the water supply as well. Fluoride: This is perhaps the most controversial of the contaminants in water (if something like water contaminants can be controversial!) because it is purposefully added to the water and there is much heated debate about the benefits/harm of this. Anyone who listened to the Heal Thy Mouth Summit is well aware of the potential dangers of Fluoride thanks to Dr. Kennedy, but the short is: If fluoride has any benefit, it would be directly to the teeth, as drinking the fluoride has not been statistically shown to increase oral health at all. Additionally, fluoride has been linked to thyroid problems and other disorders when consumed internally. So what are the options for those of us not interested in drinking a chemical cocktail every time we are thirsty? Bottled Water: Bottled water has started falling out of favor lately and with good reason. Mark’s Daily Apple did an in-depth analysis of why, but bottled water is not a good option for several reasons: Chemicals from the plastic bottle itself can leech into the water In most cases, the water itself is no different than tap water Bottled water costs more in many cases that drinking tap water Water bottles are a major source of consumer waste each year! Verdict: Not the best option on price, taste, or health so I skip it. That being said, having a bottle of water is very convenient, and there are some great sustainable options. Glass and steel water bottles are my personal favorites! Pitcher Water Filters Pitcher water filters like Brita use Granulated Activated Charcoal to remove some contaminants. They are less expensive than other filter options upfront, but require frequent filling (especially for large families) and cartridge replacement (making them more expensive in the long run). Since the carbon is not solid, it does not remove all toxins though these filters will improve taste. Pitcher filters will reduce chlorine, but are not effective at removing VOCs, heavy metals, endocrine disruptors or fluoride. This category also includes faucet mount external filters, which use the same technology. Verdict: Better than nothing, but doesn’t remove the worst offenders and is somewhat costly to use compared to other options. Reverse Osmosis (RO) Reverse Osmosis filtration uses a membrane which removes many contaminants from water. It is usually paired with a Granulated Activated Charcoal filter to remove chlorine and many mount under the sink and have a holding tank. The semipermeable membrane separates many contaminates (which usually have a larger particle size that water) from the water and rejects a large amount of water in the process. The result is a waste of several gallons of water for every gallon filtered and many naturally occurring minerals (including calcium and magnesium) are also removed from the water. We used this type of filter for a long time but added trace minerals back in to the water to replace the ones that are filtered out. It does remove a large amount of contaminants but is not the best option, in my opinion. Pros: Removes a large amount of contaminants. Many unites are stored under the sink and have a simple spigot over the counter for getting the water. Does reduce arsenic, asbestos and heavy metals. Does remove fluoride. Cons: Wastes more water than it produces. Does not reduce VOCs or endocrine disruptors. Requires adequate water pressure to work so it is not usable if home water supply is cut off. Takes up to an hour to filter one gallon of water and filters need to be replaced regularly. Removes necessary minerals from the water. Verdict: Certainly better than a lot of options out there and does remove fluoride, but not the best due to its waste of water and costly filters. Distilled Water The distillation process uses heat to cause the water to become steam. The steam rises and moves to a cooling chamber where it turns back into liquid, leaving behind many contaminants. This type of filtration reduces large particles like minerals and heavy metals but does not remove endocrine disruptors or VOCs since they vaporize at equal or lower temps that water and rise with the steam. It does effectively kill bacteria. Pros: Removes a large amount of contaminants. Does reduce arsenic, asbestos and heavy metals. Does remove fluoride. Cons: Does not reduce VOCs or endocrine disruptors. Home distillation systems are often large and expensive. Use a large amount of electricity and will not work in power outages. Removes necessary minerals from the water. Long term use can cause mineral deficiencies. Verdict: Better than bottled water, but definitely not the best option out there, especially for home situations. Solid Block Carbon Filters Recognized by the EPA as the best option for removing chemicals like herbicides, pesticides and VOCs. Quality carbon block filters will remove chemicals, pesticides, bacteria, fluoride (with filter attachment), heavy metals, nitrate, nitrites and parasites. Most are gravity based and can safely transform any type of water into safe drinking water including rain water, pond water and even sea water (though these types of water will clog the filters much more quickly and are not ideal!) It will even filter water with food coloring to create clear water (yes, I tested it…) This is the option that we use now and my only complaint is that it does take up counter space. The advantages are that it is gravity based and will work even without electricity or running water. While these types of units can be more pricey that pitcher filters or other filters up front, they seem to be the least expensive in the long run and require the fewest filter replacements (a big plus for me!). These types of filters also don’t remove naturally occurring minerals from the water, making it the best tasting filtered water option, in my opinion. Using a filter calculator, I’ve determined that the specific system we use won’t need to be replaced for over 20 years with our current usage (though I’m guessing our usage will increase as the kids get older). The most common type of this filter is the Berkey and it comes in many sizes for different uses. It can even be used camping to filter river water for drinking! (Tested this too and it saved one of my brother in-laws from Giardia when other members of his group got it while camping) Pros: Filters VOCs, heavy metals, chlorine, fluoride, nitrates/ites, bacteria, parasites and other chemicals. Very inexpensive per gallon cost and infrequent filter replacement. Great tasting water. Doesn’t require electricity or water pressure to work. Portable options can even be used while traveling. Cons: Does require counter space and does have to be manually filled (not a big deal for us, we just fill at night and we have plenty of water the next day). More expensive up front. Does not remove endocrine disruptors and there are some concerns with third party testing with some brands. Verdict: A good option, especially in places where under-counter or permanent systems are not an option. We uses this one for years before our current system. Under Counter Multi-Stage Filters: After years of research and trying most of the options above at some point, we finally found and switched to an under-counter multi-stage water filter system that meets all of the criteria and exceeds them. I review the one we personally use in depth in this post, but in short, it filters water through a 14-stage process that utilizes most of the methods listed above, along with others like UV and adds minerals back in. During the filtration process, water goes through these stages: Stage 1 – Five Micron Pre-Filter Stage 2 – Internal Coconut Shell Carbon Filter (like Berkey) Stage 3 – Reverse Osmosis Membrane (Purifier #1) (like regular RO but more efficient) Stage 4 – Mixed Bed De-Ionization Purifier (Purifier #2) Stage 5 – Mixed Bed De-Ionization Purifier (Purifier #3) Stages 6 & 7 – Homeopathic Restructuring – Erasing Memory, Molecule Coherence Stage 8 – Holding Tank – standard tank holds about 3 gallons of pure water. Other tanks are available. Stage 9 – Ultraviolet Light – 14 Watt Stage 10 – Reprogramming – Adding Natural Mineral Properties Stages 11-12 – Far-Infrared Reprogramming Stage 13 – Coconut Shell Carbon Post-Filtration Stage 14 – Alka-Min (Alkalizing, Ionic Remineralization) It removes fluoride, lead, chlorine, MTBE, chromium-6, nitrates, pesticides, pharmaceutical residues, water-borne illness and more. We absolutely love this water filter and I’ve recommended it to my own family members. Pros: Removes the widest range of contaminants. Very easy to use with no manual filling required. Spigot attaches near sink for easy use. Water tastes great. Cons: Must be installed under the sink. We had to hire a plumber for this, though we probably could have figured it out ourselves, I was just reluctant to try. Verdict: The best option I’ve found and the one we currently use.
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I am 23 years. I am feeling very weak. And I also feel one side pain in my head in every night. Please tell me what to do?

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Nutrition Certification,Registered Dietitian
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
1. Keep yourself hydrated. 2. Get extra rest for some days till you feel more energetic. 3. Avoid watching television for long hours. Indulge in relaxing activities. 4. Avoid stress and too much physical exertion. 5. Take a nutritious diet with more protein items in homemade food like soya, sprouts, dals, paneer, milk, seasonal fruits. 6. Do light physical activity, meditation and yoga. 7. Take one good multivitamin tablet after food for 7 days.
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I am too much thin can you give me some tips of my dite to increase my weight and what can I eat to do this kind.

Ph.D - Ayurveda, FFAM-Post Graduate Fellowship, MD - Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Delhi
Weight gain, stamina and strength depends on regular healthy diet, dry fruits, good sleep, exercises, yoga postures and some herbal supplements are required to gain weight and to get healthy figure.

What diet should one take while on regular running schedule and when would it be better to jog that is either morning or evening.

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Nutrition Certification,Registered Dietitian
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
Hi the best diet for anyone who is pursuing cardiovascular activities is one which comprises more amount of protein and less carbohydrates and fats. Consume all types of protein from both veg and non veg sources throughout the day. Try to consume least amount of simple carbohydrates which mainly comes from sweet and processed foods. Complex carbohydrates like brown rice, brown bread and oats are good. And avoid any types of fats during the day. Extra virgin olive oil is an exception but that should be consumed during the day time only. And there is no such health benefits difference between morning and evening jog. Both provide you the same benefits. Do what you feel comfortable.
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I am felling weak and not much concentration power in studying and any other work so what can I do?

Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian (RD), PGDD, Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S), General Physician
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Diet and workouts go a long way in helping you gain strength to gain weight, you must eat more calories than you burn. When you gain weight, some will be fat and some will be muscle. To gain muscle, you must eat protein. To boost the ratio of muscle to fat gain, you must exercise. To gain muscle and strength, you must engage in resistance exercise. To improve bodyfat percentage and gain weight, you must cycle through phases of gaining muscle and losing fat. I being a both a registered dietitian (rd) and doctor have been successfully helping patients with their problems through a holistic approach using customized therapeutic diet and medications. I will also suggest home remedies. Do reply back for private consultation for rx.
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How to lead a healthy life and become strong and fresh minded tell some steps and smart phones using will affect our physical strength.

M. sc Psychology, BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
Good question Mr. Lybrate user. Keep it up. To maintan good quality of life, first of all, you need to focus on your diet intake, which should be home maqde, wel balanced with more proteins, less fats& carbohydrates, more fibre rich, like you can take all non. Veg items but fresh, home made, less spicy, less oily but not fried in oils, etc. If eggs, prefer white. If pure veg, you take, more dal, millets, spouts, dry fruits[even if you take, non. Veg also, you should take more veg is better}, milk morning & nigt before going to bed, replace sugar intake with jaggery or honey, take 3-4 litres of water/day. That too taking 1/2 litre to 1 litr in morning with empty stomach is very good for body as a cleanser. Do not forget to keep mind & body in qyilibrium by practicing yoga, pranayama, mediattion, breathing exercises, regularly& physically to become fit, do exercises, warm ups, playing some favourite spiort regularly is good. Try to avid alcohol, smoking max. If any tea habit, its okay if 1-2 times, but reduce more than 2 times if its or, try to replace with lemon tea, or green tea. Avoid junk/fatty/packed/fast/spicy/oily/out side/canned food& drinks, like carbonated rinks. Take more green leafy veg, veg, in your diet. Avoid using smart phones usage at maximum at your level, I know now a days, its must for everybody, for every thing, so try to limit to certain period on urself, use ear phones max. Whenever you need to listen or talk. Take care.
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My body is so slim what I can do I try to eating all food but no effect in my body Please guide to me what I can do become my body normal.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MD - Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Bhavnagar
Ayurveda believes in digestion not into giving heavy food for weight gain. According to ayurveda, food which are easy to digest but nutrient can gain weight. But I need detait history for perfact solution. Like your appetite? bowel habits sleeping habits kind of your work or job life style diet etc. But till you can do following: take daal rice more. Use cow ghee n milk. Avoid over eating start massage with til oil in morning, after that, do exercise whatever you want. Then bath focus in yourself avoid stress anger fear take ajvayan 1 tsp after meal. Start chyavanprash in morning. For medicine I need you more history.
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Iam 19 years old and I want to increase my weight. So what should I prefer for my diet.

PG Diploma in Emergency Medicine Services (PGDEMS), Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MD - Alternate Medicine
Ayurveda, Ghaziabad
Hi to increase weight you should improve your digestive system. By digesting your indigested food with the help of remedy and medicines will ultimately increase your appetite and digestive system. Take chitrakadi vati after meal. Take ashwagandha churna with water twice a day. Take banana milk shake. Take pranacharaya karsyatanashak capsule twice a day. Take sleep after taking meal drink lots of milk and eat lots of milk products. Like butter. Ghee.
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My wife had two missed abortions in 3 years, she advised the tests ACL. PLease advice.

DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), PGDHHM, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Delhi
There are many reasons for abortion. One of the reason is apla syndrome for which acl test is done. It is blood test better get it done. So that if positive medicine for same can be started.
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Caring for Your Sexual Health in Your 30s

MBBS
Sexologist, Delhi
Caring for Your Sexual Health in Your 30s

Men in their 20s are more active and possess fast metabolic rate and they can be good in bed too, even after having a tiresome day. How can this not be possible in your 30s? This is because you have hit your 30s and there is a lot of difference in the peak you had in your previous ages. This change is quite critical, as what you do during these changes affects your overall sexual health. 
The male menopause also known as andropause starts hitting individuals as early as 35. During this stage, there is a drop in the libido and even can cause erectile dysfunctions. 

How do you avoid this? 
Here what you can do on a regular basis to keep yourself fit at all times so you can be fit when it matters the most! 

  • Check your family medical history 
  • Check your testosterone levels proactively 
  • Eliminate artificial sweeteners 
  • Keep a check on your alcohol consumption 
  • Dump the junk and add more veggies on the palate 
  • Get a lot of sleep 
  1. Check your family medical history: Family history is an important determinant to understand the faults in one's genetic DNA. It matters even though you and your family must be living a different lifestyle or live in a different environment, but as they say, it is all in the genes. You can still lead a healthy sex life if you are active and fit at times available to you. 
  2. Check your testosterone levels proactively: Declining levels of testosterone brings a lot of problems such as hair loss, decreased sex drive, depression and memory levels which is again a vicious cycle. To avoid this, include meat, fish, cheese and yogurt in your regular diet. 
  3. Eliminate artificial sweeteners: Sugar may not be our strongest friend, but it is our strongest foe for it all does other than lessening sweetness in our morning tea, coffee, diet soda, but also increases the risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. 
  4. Keep a check on your alcohol consumption: It is okay if we gulp down a drink or two of red wine daily, but if it is more than that, then you can say goodbye to love making sessions as excessive drinking can not only destroy your liver and your gut and so on, but also impairs your libido. The key here is just moderation. 
  5. Get a lot of sleep: A minimum 6 hours of sleep is ideal as it helps your brain health, manages your stress levels and most importantly optimizes the male hormone production, which helps you in a healthy libido to satiate your partner. Men who sleep less than 6 hours have an increased risk of stroke and heart disease as well. So take care of your body while you can before it's too late!
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How to increase weight? And how to increase eye sight? How to reduce stress? How to increase concentration?

PGDD, RD, Bachelor of Home Science
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Hye, Thanks for the query. If you want to gain some weight, you need to eat more calories than you burn. 1.  Eat 5 to 6 meals a day In order to gain weight, you need to start eating 5-6 meals a day. However, it is important that you break these meals into parts, as eating a lot at once may result in indigestion. Also, be sure to include healthy foods in your diet for a healthy weight gain. 2.  Weight train at least 3 times a week When you train with weights, your muscles grow. 3.  Consume more calories than you burn. Eating calories more than your normal intake may not be easy, but you must do it if you want to stop being skinny. Make sure you don’t do it just by overeating at once, but instead do it gradually over the whole day.  4.  Work out your entire body A lot of gym goers usually train only the muscles on their arms, chest and shoulders and this is a grave error. Make sure you workout your entire body for a wholesome weight gain. 5.  Load up on protein As informed earlier, you have to consume more calories than your normal intake every day. You can do this by eating foods rich in protein like dairy, meat, eggs, nuts, dry fruits, pulses, sprouts, smoothies, milk shakes etc.  6.  Drink your calories It may be tough to meet your calorie requirements by just eating. Drinking milk, lassi, milkshakes or fruit smoothies with little or no sugar can be a great way to load up on the required calories. 7.  Try and eat fast (but don’t choke on it) Your body takes some time to give signals of satiety which is why eating fast can help you eat more. 8.  Focus on recovery after each workout Stretching exercises, foods rich in carbohydrates can help recover your body significantly. Also, you should aim for 8 hours of sleep as inadequate sleep can cause several problems. 9.  Be patient with yourself Hoping to gain weight quickly in a healthy manner is unrealistic. Even if you follow all the advice that is there, you may end up gaining just 1-2 kilos in a month. Every body is different, and just because you are not seeing results in terms of weight gain, you shouldn’t feel discouraged. Living healthy by eating the right diet will make you feel better and more positive about life and increase your strength. 10.  Believe in yourself Following your regimen may seem incredibly difficult if you don’t believe that you will one day be able to transform your body.  Once your nutrition improves you will improve in all other aspects like eyesight, concentration etc.
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Advantages of water intake

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Advantages of water intake

WATER, a basic need of every lifeform, helps a lot in fighting against some common diseases/ health problems.

Drinking water, either plain or in the form of other fluids or foods, is essential to your health:

  • It helps in maintained balance of fluids in our body The functions of these bodily fluids include digestion, absorption, circulation, creation of saliva, transportation of nutrients, and maintenance of body temperature.
  • It helps keep skin looking good. It helps in preventing skin problems like acne. It also keeps your skin moistened and gives it a natural glow.
  • It helps in many diseases related to stomach like gastritis/acidity. Drinking sufficient amount of water daily will avoid the problem of acidity in your near future.
  • It also helps in losing weight in case of obese individuals and also in maintaining weight in case of non-obese individuals.
  • It helps in preventing as well as treating urinary infections.
  • It helps in maintaining normal bowel function and prevents constipation. Actually, water along with a high fibre diet is the perfect combination for those suffering from constipation.

Now, the question in every mind- How much water should one drink? People drink 2-3 glasses and think thats enough for a day. Some people dont keep count and are not sure if they are having sufficient water daily.

Its best to keep a one litre bottle and set a target to drink at least 3 such bottles in a day, that makes 3 liters of water intake daily.Also, eat more fruits and vegetables(salad). Their high water content will add to your hydration.

Be Hydrated Be Healthy

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