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Dr. Sumanth

MBBS

Psychiatrist, Bangalore

200 at clinic
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Dr. Sumanth MBBS Psychiatrist, Bangalore
200 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Sumanth
Dr. Sumanth is a popular Psychiatrist in Yelahanka, Bangalore. He has done MBBS . You can visit him at Deeksha Hospital in Yelahanka, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Sumanth and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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MBBS - - -

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Deeksha Hospital

#387/347, B B Road, Old Town, Next To-Post Office, Yelahanka Old TownBangalore Get Directions
200 at clinic
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Deeksha Hospital

#387/347, B B Road, Old Town, Yelahanka. Landmark : Next To Post Office.Bangalore Get Directions
200 at clinic
...more
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Good morning sir i m from pune my question is due to stress my head is paining badly n its starts frm neck n goes up only after taking pain keeler I get relief pls sugest any medication or food n also my daughter is forget things vry fast she cnt concentrate on study n in exams she dnt remember anything .pls help.

BHMS
Homeopath, Gandhinagar
Good morning sir
i m  from pune my question is due to stress my head is paining badly n its starts frm neck n goes up...
Hello, To reduce stress do breathing exercise watch positive videos do positive activity like plantation or like wise if your mind get diverted towards positive things your stress will be reduced. Same way your daughter will do breathing exercise her brain will get good source of fresh oxygen and forgetful nature will gradually reduce.
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I am 55 years male and suffering from depression due to excessive guilt last 20 years. I am on allopathic treatment from last 15 years and presently taking lamitor OD 200 mg, zovane 40 mg, clonil 25 mg, qutipin 25 mg sizdon .5 mg but I am not feeling that I am completely free from the depression.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I am 55 years male and suffering from depression due to excessive guilt last 20 years. I am on allopathic treatment f...
Guilt is good. Yes! Guilt actually encourages people to have more empathy for others, to take corrective action, and to improve themselves. Self-forgiveness following guilt is essential to esteem, which is key to enjoyment of life and relationships. Yet, for many, self-acceptance remains elusive because of unhealthy guilt – sometimes for decades or a lifetime. Guilt may be an unrelenting source of pain. You might hold a belief that you should feel guilty and condemn yourself – not once, but over and over – or guilt may simmer in your unconscious. Either way, this kind of guilt is insidious and self-destructive and can sabotage your goals. Guilt causes anger and resentment, not only at yourself, but toward others in order to justify your actions. Anger, resentment, and guilt sap your energy, cause depression and illness, and stop you from having success, pleasure, and fulfilling relationships. It keeps you stuck in the past and prevents you from moving forward. You may feel guilty not only for your actions, but also thoughts: For instance, wishing someone pain, misfortune, or even death; or for feelings, like anger, lust, or greed; or lack of feelings, such as not reciprocating love or friendship, or not feeling grief over the loss of someone close. Although irrational, you might feel guilty for the thoughts, attributes, feelings, and actions of someone else. It’s not unusual for people to feel guilty for leaving their faith or not meeting the expectations of their parents. People often judge themselves based upon the blame or false accusations emanating from others, which they believe to be true. For example, a woman projects her self-centeredness onto her husband and accuses him of being selfish. He believes it, not realizing it is she who is selfish (attribute). She might blame her insecurity (feeling) on him, claiming he’s flirting, uncaring, or indifferent. A man might blame his anger (feeling), or mistake (action) on his partner, and she believes him and feels guilty. It’s common for codependents to take the blame for others’ behavior, because of their low self-esteem. A spouse might accept her husband’s blame and feel guilty for his drinking or addiction. Victims of abuse or sexual assault frequently feel guilt and shame, despite the fact that they were victims and it’s the perpetrator that is culpable. When it comes to divorce, those initiating it often feel guilty, even though responsibility for their marital problem is shared or was primarily due to their partner. Guilt should be distinguished from shame, where you feel inferior, inadequate, or bad about who you’re verses what you did. When irrational and not absolved, guilt can lead to shame. Shame isn’t constructive. Instead of enhancing empathy and self-improvement, it has the opposite effect. It leads to greater self-preoccupation and undermines both the self and relationships. If you already have low self-esteem or have issues around shame (most people do), it may be difficult to concentrate on what it is you feel guilty about. However, this is necessary in order to get past it. Rationalizing or brushing it under the rug to avoid self-examination may help temporarily, but not achieve self-forgiveness. Alternatively, beating yourself up prolongs guilt and shame and damages your self-esteem; while, accepting responsibility and taking remedial action improves it. Here are suggested steps you can take. I refer to actions, but they apply equally to thoughts or feelings you feel guilty about: 1. If you’ve been rationalizing your actions, take responsibility. “Okay, I did (or said) it.” 2. Write a story about what happened, including how you felt about yourself and others involved before, during, and after. 3. Analyze what were your needs at that time, and were they being met. If not, why not? 4. What were your motives? What or who was the catalyst for your behavior? 5. Does the catalyst remind you of something from your past? Write a story about it, and include dialogue and your feelings. 6. How were your feelings and mistakes handled growing up? Were they forgiven, judged, or punished? Who was hard on you? Were you made to feel ashamed? 7. Evaluate the standards by which you’re judging yourself. Are they your values, your parents’, your friends’, your spouse’s, or those of your faith? Do you need their approval? It’s pointless to try to live up to someone else’s expectations. Others’ desires and values have more to do with them. They may never approve, or you may sacrifice yourself and your happiness seeking approval. 8. Identify the values and beliefs that in fact governed you during the event? For example, “Adultery is okay if my spouse never finds out.” Be honest, and decide which values you agree with. 9. Did your actions reflect your true values? If not, trace your beliefs, thoughts, and emotions that led to your actions. Think about what may have led you to abandon your values? Notice that you hurt yourself when you violate your values. This actually causes more harm than disappointing someone else. 10. How did your actions affect you and others? Whom did you hurt? Include yourself on the list. 11. Think of ways to make amends? Take action, and make them. For example, if the person is dead, you can write a letter of apology. You can also decide to act differently in the future. 12. Looking back, what healthier beliefs, thoughts, feelings, and actions would have led to a more desirable result? 13. Do you expect perfection? Has this improved your overall well-being? Perfection is illusory and a manifestation of underlying shame. 14. Would you forgive someone else for the same actions? Why would you treat yourself differently? How does it benefit you to continue to punish yourself? 15. Remorse is healthy and leads to corrective action. Think about what you’ve learned from your experience and how you might act differently in today. 16. Write yourself an empathic letter of understanding, appreciation, and forgiveness. 17. Repeat on a daily basis words of kindness and forgiveness from your letter, such as, “I’m innocent,” “I forgive myself,” and “I love myself.” 18. Share honestly with others what you did. Don’t share with those who might judge you. If appropriate, talk about what happened in a 12-Step group. Secrecy prolongs guilt and shame. Realize that you can forgive yourself and still believe you were at fault, just as you might forgive someone else even though you think the person was in the wrong. You can regret what you did, yet accept that you’re human and make mistakes. Perhaps, you did your best, given your circumstances, awareness, maturity, and experience at the time. This is a healthy, humble attitude. If you have any further queries feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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How to concentrate on my studies & lower my time of sleep & please suggest the proper diet, and how to sharpen my mind?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
How to concentrate on my studies  & lower my time of sleep & please suggest the proper diet, and how to sharpen my mind?
I don't know how much you sleep but sleep deprivation will affect your concentration. If you are sleeping for around 8 hours per day, that is perfect. You may be under some stress, and I do not know if you are aware of it. Find out what this disturbance is all about and as you address it, memory and concentration will happily return to favor you. Do meet with a counselor, if your stress is too much. In the meantime please follow the suggested guidelines: Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night?s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely. In that case, I suggest that you and the family go for counseling too.
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I lost my close one last year. Feeling very depressed and loosed hope of living. Please help me.

BHMS
Homeopath, Delhi
I lost my close one last year. Feeling very depressed and loosed hope of living. Please help me.
Hello Aditya One needs to live with all the gains and loses in the process called living and life is like that only. It happens with everyone at some point of life. Being sad is a natural reaction in this case. Losing the hope of living is not the solution for this. Remember Hope is a good thing, may be the best of things, and no good thing ever dies. You take this homoeopathic medicine and get back to me after 7 days 1. Ignatia 1000/once a day for one day. 2. Saclac 30/thrice daily/ 7 days. You will feel a lot better.
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Hello doctor, my aunt is suffering from a mental illness. She blabbers loudly throughout the day, she feels she is superior to all and everyone is trying to get her down. She is highly superstitious. She also gets hallucination and trust only people who praise her. She has immense amount of energy compared to a women of age of 55. What kind of syndrome is this? What can be possible treatment as it is very difficult to take her to a doctor whole day she keeps on screaming loudly in house please help.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
Hello doctor,
my aunt is suffering from a mental illness.
She blabbers loudly throughout the day, she feels she is su...
Hi she could be in manic phase. Does she talk big have grandiose ideas and plans decreased sleep still very active and fresh talking too much spending too much aggressive and thinking too highly of her self. If yes get her checked by a psychiatrist asap. Don't worry it completely curable.
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Hi doctor I am 24 years old female unmarried my question is how to forget someone whom you love hum jaldi kisi se bi close ho jaye hai per use dur hone ke bad kaise rahe pls tell me suggestion what should I do? As I am facing this problem I am not able to concentrate on my professional life how I deal with it? Pls tell me ASAP.

M phil in Rehabilitation Psychology, M Sc in Medical Psychology
Psychologist, Hyderabad
Hi doctor I am 24 years old female unmarried my question is how to forget someone whom you love hum jaldi kisi se bi ...
Hello lybrate-user, I will give you a different approach. Is it really necessary to forget that person whom you loved? Can you accept him to have been a part of your life and then decide to move on? Once you accept, you will not be so distracted with his thoughts and it might be easier to concentrate on the work at hand. Apart from this, time is the biggest healer. So be gentle to yourself, give yourself some time and you will see that the intensity of feelings will reduce. I wish you well.
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I have psychological problem from the childhood. My problem is I can not face from photography. When anyone take my picture I at that time I feel tickle & sweat. Everytime I pass same situation .I can not do eye contact to camera.in any occasion when someone take my picture ao alwaysly there will be lights ane camera bt sir really I do not face it. No one can believe my this situation .plz sir help me why it happens with me. When I tell this anyone .everyone laugh at me. Sir plzz help me .give me reply sir on my this stage decease. Sir/madam plzzz.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Guwahati
I have psychological problem from the childhood. My problem is I can not face from photography. When anyone take my p...
Whenever you face a camera you feel uneasy and you try to avoid it, and there is no other problem in any spheres of your life except facing camera. This indicates the possibility that you may be having Specific phobia for photography. Specific Phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. In specific phobia, a person has unreasonable or irrational fear related to exposure to specific objects or situations. As a result, the affected person tends to actively avoid direct contact with the objects or situations. The fear or anxiety may be triggered both by the presence and the anticipation of the specific object or situation. Although people with this type of phobias realize that their fear is irrational, even thinking about it can often cause extreme anxiety. Exposure to the object also causes various physical symptoms such as pounding heart, vomiting tendency, diarrhea, sweating, trembling or shaking, numbness or tingling sensation, shortness of breath, dizziness, choking sensation, chest pain or discomfort, stomach upset, chills or hot flashes, looking flushed etc. This phobia may be associated with some traumatic experience of childhood; maybe some unpleasant incident happened during your childhood while clicking photo when you were a child. Though the actual event forgotten, but its impact stayed back. It may also be a learned behavior: as a child you might have seen someone close reacting with fear while taking photo & you started responding the same way, which became intense as you grew up. At times the cause is not known. To reach the actual diagnosis, get yourself evaluated by a Psychiatrist, who will prescribe you medicines or advice you counseling sessions accordingly. Along with medicines, various behavior techniques & therapies are available to help you overcome this problem. Along with, put your effort to come out of this situation. You need to face your fear rather than avoiding it. Before facing the camera, go mentally prepared for it. Try to keep stay calm & relaxed. More you will face the camera, your confidence will grow more & you will become more determined to overcome the situation. After facing the camera, if you feel there is improvement in you, praise & encourage yourself. You are not alone in suffering from this type of problem. Many are suffering from this problem in different forms & many had also overcome it with proper therapy & self determination. So stay positive. Though facing camera make you uncomfortable, you are still managing to control your fears and carry on with daily activities. This is a good positive sign. There is solution to this problem & you can also come out of it.
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I am pure vegetarian, I will not consume egg also, as I noticed that compared to others I am somewhat week, suggest me veg diet which increases stamina.

BHMS, DNHE
Homeopath, Udaipur
I am pure vegetarian, I will not consume egg also, as I noticed that compared to others I am somewhat week, suggest m...
alfa vina malt 2TSF bd before meal one month cap Rizan plus 1 od for 1 month Syp aptivate 2 TSF bd for 15 days take fruits and salads
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