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Dr. Nutan Anand  - Pediatrician, Bangalore

Dr. Nutan Anand

85 (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - Pediatrics

Pediatrician, Bangalore

12 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Dr. Nutan Anand 85% (10 ratings) MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - P... Pediatrician, Bangalore
12 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Nutan Anand
Dr. Nutan Anand is a trusted Pediatrician in Sarjapur Road, Bangalore. She has been a practicing Pediatrician for 12 years. She is a MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - Pediatrics . You can consult Dr. Nutan Anand at AddressHealth Child Health Clinic (Healthy Children Happy Children) in Sarjapur Road, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Nutan Anand and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 34 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery - B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences - 2006
MD - Pediatrics - B.P Koirala of Health Intitute Science - 2008
Languages spoken
English

Location

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Motherhood - Sarjapur

514/ 1-2-3, Kaikondara Village, Opp. More Mall, Sarjapur RoadBangalore Get Directions
  4.3  (312 ratings)
600 at clinic
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I have 15 days old baby boy. Usually he sleeps during mother feeding. Is it normal and what are the tricks to keep him awake?

Masters in Human Nutrition and Nutraceuticals
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Madurai
I have 15 days old baby boy. Usually he sleeps during mother feeding. Is it normal and what are the tricks to keep hi...
Sleeping is common for a 15 day old baby. So do not worry on that. He will be active as the month increases. Thank you.
1 person found this helpful
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My baby is in 2nd month. In 1st month, I fed her every 2 hrs. Should I continue that? or what should be the frequency of feeding?

MD - Paediatrics, FIAP (Neonatology)
Pediatrician, Chandigarh
Kindly feed the baby on demand. There would be a phase in 24 hrs the baby will sleep for a longer duration like most adults. Rest make sure the baby must take feed at least 8 times a day.
1 person found this helpful
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My baby's fetal hemoglobin is 7.7 is it normal range of a 8 months old and any risk of thalassemia disease.

MBBS, MRCPCH
Pediatrician, Kolkata
My baby's fetal hemoglobin is 7.7 is it normal range of a 8 months old and any risk of thalassemia disease.
Please clarify. Is the hemoglobin 7.7 which may be normal. But if the foetal hemoglobin is 7.7% of total hemoglobin this is too high and further testing for thalassemia is essential.
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My son age 10 month and sand off disease diagnosed. What is the treatment for such?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Tumkur
My son age 10 month and sand off disease diagnosed. What is the treatment for such?
Sandhoff disease is an inherited storage disorder. No specific treatment. Show to a good pediatrician.
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Boosting Your Child's Immunity - 7 Things You Need To Do Right!

Diploma In Paediatric
Pediatrician, Patna
Boosting Your Child's Immunity - 7 Things You Need To Do Right!

Is your child undergoing Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders (PIDDs)? If you are tired of seeing your child suffering with regular cold and cough which could be solely due to a lack of nutrients in the diet, resulting in low immunity of the body. Adopting healthy habits by cutting back on junk food while including healthy items will help raise your child’s immunity levels immensely.

Some of the best foods to include in the diet to increase the immunity of your child are mentioned below:

  1. Eggs, pulses, lean meats and other healthy protein: Immunity buildup may be disrupted if there isn’t enough protein in your diet. Milk protein in cow’s milk or dairy products like butter and cheese, animal protein in lean meats such as chicken and ovo-protein in eggs are highly beneficial and raise immunity levels.
  2. Fish for immunity build up: Fish is a great immunity builder and also helps in making the brain work more efficiently. Fish meat contains lean proteins as well as essential Omega-3 acids which help properly regulate many functions within the body raising immunity.
  3. Stay healthy with yogurt: There are a lot many flavored varieties of curd or yogurt that your child may like and which is also considered as a power food source. It helps reduce gastrointestinal illnesses. However, try and go for the less flavored ones as they would have lesser amounts of processed sugar.
  4. Oats and Barley for your rescue: The reason why oats and barley are healthy alternatives, especially for children is because they are composed of beta-glucan (fibre containing antioxidants and antimicrobial properties). This helps in avoiding constipation thus cleaning the intestine and hence avoiding the buildup of harmful bacteria within the body.
  5. Fruit toppings are delicious: Fruits are not limited to mangoes, apples and bananas only. Darker the color of the fruit, greater is the nutritional value. Berries, peaches, melons, pomegranates etc, can and should also be included in your fruit intake as they are healthy as well as tasty.
  6. Vegetables can be tasty too: Growing children require leafy green vegetables for physical and mental development as they contain zinc, iron and folic acid. Foods like fenugreek leaves and spinach are an example of vitamin rich food items. You can include spinach and other vegetables in a clever manner by making the food interesting so that children would want to eat it willingly.
  7. Carrots to fight infectionCarrots are beneficial for good eyesight and protection from infections. With carrot intake it becomes quite difficult for the bacteria and germs to ender the blood vessels. This can be made into a salad or craved figuring to make it interesting to the kids.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2742 people found this helpful

Common Defence Mechanisms!

Msc - Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Bangalore

Shielding your ego - common defence mechanisms:
 

We generally try to protect ourselves from things that we don't want to think about or deal with. Just remind yourself of the last time you referred to someone as being in denial or accused someone of rationalising. Both these terms are actually referred to as defence mechanisms in psychology. Defence mechanism is an unconscious psychological mechanism that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful stimuli. In short, it is a strategy used by the ego to protect itself from anxiety.

 The use of the most common defence mechanisms:

1. Denial: it is a clear refusal to admit or recognise an obvious truth about something that has happened or is upcoming. Denial functions to protect the ego from things that the individual cannot cope with. For instance, drug addicts and alcoholics often deny that they have a problem, or victims of traumatic events deny that the event ever occurred as it is too uncomfortable or traumatic to face. 

2. Repression And suppression: in both repression and suppression we tend to remove anxiety provoking memories from our conscious awareness. When we consciously force unwanted information out of our awareness it is called suppression. However, even unconscious memories, as in repression don't just disappear, they continue to influence the person's behaviour. For instance, a person abused as a child might face difficulties forming relationships as an adult.

3. Displacement: it involves venting out anger, frustration and other negative impulses on people or situations that are less threatening. For instance, rather than expressing aggression or anger towards your boss, you to tend to express it towards your spouse, children, or pets as they are less threatening and have few negative consequences.

4. Sublimation: it is a way of acting out unacceptable impulses by converting them into more acceptable forms of behaviour. As freud believes, it is a mature way of behaving normally in socially acceptable ways. For instance, a childless woman might start a day care to fulfil her desire of nurturing a child.

5. Projection: it involves ascribing our unacceptable qualities or feelings to others. For instance, if you have an aversion towards someone, you might say that person doesn't respect you or doesn't like you.

6. Intellectualisation: it helps reduce anxiety by being cold and focusing more on the intellectual components of the situation, while avoiding the stressful emotional component of a traumatic or anxiety provoking situation. For instance, a person just diagnosed with cancer might focus on learning everything about it, in order to avoid distress and distant himself from the reality of the situation.

7. Rationalisation: it involves explaining an unacceptable behaviour or feeling in a more rational or logical manner, while avoiding the true reasons for the behaviour. For instance, a student might explain his poor grades by blaming the examiner rather than his own lack of preparation.

8. Regression: it involves reverting to childhood patterns of behaviour failing to cope with stressful events. For instance, an adult fixated in his childhood days might lack maturity and may cry or sulk upon hearing unpleasant news. 

9. Reaction formation: it involves taking up the opposite feeling or behaviour in an attempt to hide true feelings by behaving in the exact opposite manner. For instance, treating someone you dislike in an extremely friendly manner in an attempt to hide your true feelings.

Although defence mechanisms are often thought of as negative reactions, some of these can actually help ease stress during critical times, diverting their attention to what is more necessary at the moment.
 

What types of food should I give my baby after 6 months? Can I give cow milk to my baby after 6 months?

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH), Pediatric Gastroenterology
Pediatrician, Delhi
What types of food should I give my baby after 6 months?
Can I give cow milk to my baby after 6 months?
Your child should be started complementary feeds, which means home food in addition to breast milk. A six month old baby is ready for starting food other than breast/formula milk. You can start by giving the baby some fresh fruit juice, mashed banana and thin moong dal khichri. You can give narial pani, vegetable soup (stained). Remember that salt and sugar should be used sparingly. Start one thing at a time, see how the baby likes it. You can use full cream packaged milk, undiluted after boiling and removing the malai, with katori and spoon. Do not use bottles. Bottle feeding causes diarrhoea.
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Sir my daughter age is 12 year, she taking food & fruits normally qty, that to be we are forcing. We are using tonics for her hungry but food taking normally please give suggests me.

PGD-AP, MD, Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Do stool. Urine exam. Cbc to rule anaemia. Give her choice of food. Explain her importance of food contents.
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Sir my son has tongue problem. Means when my son put out his tongue then pic point of tongue make a heart shape. Means connector of tongue and jaw joined together. Due to this complete tongue not put out as usual. Please advise me what I do. Age of son is 4 year.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Hi, your son seems to b. E having a tongue tie. That makes moving tongue upward and outward difficult. This can be corrected with a minor tongue tie surgery. Get him to your dentist and get a complete checkup done. Tongue tie surgery can help him to freely move his tongue.
2 people found this helpful
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When Does My Child Need Speech Therapy?

B. Sc. Speech & Hearing
Speech Therapist, Delhi
When Does My Child Need Speech Therapy?

When it comes to speech, every child has a different pace of learning. In the first year, they should be able to recognize and respond to their own names and simple directions like ‘come’, etc. By a child’s second birthday, he or she should be able to use a single word or two-word phrases and understand simple questions. If a child’s speech development seems atypical for his or her age, you may need to consult a speech therapist. Some of the things you should look out for are:

  1. Mispronouncing vowels: Many children have problems with pronunciation. Pronouncing ‘bath’ as ‘baf’ or ‘animal’ as ‘amal’ is normal. However, if they cannot pronounce vowels correctly, they may be having problems with articulation. For example, your child might say ‘coo’ instead of ‘cow’.
  2. Using only single words: Part of a speech therapist’s job is to teach a child to join words together to create phrases and sentences. If even after your child’s second birthday, they still prefer using single words instead of phrases, you should consult a speech therapist. For example, they may just say ‘water’ instead of ‘i want water’.
  3. Stuttering: Many children are shy and hesitant of speaking especially in front of strangers. However, stuttering is a more serious problem. This could be in the form of repeating syllables or prolonging words. For example, ‘s-s-s-s-s-stop’ or ‘mmmmmm me’. If this is not nipped in the bud, it could continue into the child’s adult life as well.
  4. Answering a question by repeating part of it: By the age of three years, a child should be able to understand and answer simple questions. If the child answers a question by repeating part of it, such as answering “do you want food” with “you want food”, it could be a sign of a bigger problem. This is known as echolalia and might be an early symptom of autism.
  5. Limited vocabulary: Each child’s vocabulary grows at a different rate but it is important to be able to notice an increase in the child’s vocabulary from month to month. If the child uses only a finite set of words and does not catch on to new words, you may need a speech therapist. They can help the child expand their vocabulary and become more receptive to new words.

Other factors you should watch out for include difficulty with pronouns, not being able to follow instructions and understand prepositions and confusion with gender. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2895 people found this helpful
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