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Dr. Aruna Kumari V  - Gynaecologist, Bangalore

Dr. Aruna Kumari V

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DGO

Gynaecologist, Bangalore

13 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Dr. Aruna Kumari V MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DGO Gynaecologist, Bangalore
13 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Aruna Kumari V
Dr. Aruna Kumari V is a trusted Gynaecologist in Sarjapur, Bangalore. She has had many happy patients in her 13 years of journey as a Gynaecologist. She is a qualified MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DGO . You can consult Dr. Aruna Kumari V at Motherhood Hospital in Sarjapur, Bangalore. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Aruna Kumari V on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Gynaecologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. We will help you find the best Gynaecologists online in Bangalore. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
MBBS - Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India - 2005
MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology - Calcutta National Medical College - 2010
DGO - Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India - 2009
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

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Motherhood - Sarjapur

514/ 1-2-3, Kaikondara Village, Opp. More Mall, Sarjapur RoadBangalore Get Directions
  4.3  (324 ratings)
600 at clinic
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I have taken ovral g for 10 days .7 day passed but till now I am not getting my periods. What to do now.

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FMAS, DMAS
Gynaecologist, Noida
I have taken ovral g for 10 days .7 day passed but till now I am not getting my periods. What to do now.
Hello, You should wait for another week to allow menses, if not then can opt for withdrawal bleeding.
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Hi Had intercourse on 18th may 6th day of period and used condom. Just want to know is there any chance of getting pregnant? I also took a pregnancy test on 29th may and result was negative, should I take it once more, or there is no need? please suggest what is to be done, i'm very stressed?

M.B.S.(HOMEO), MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Visakhapatnam
Menstrual cycles have several days at the beginning that are infertile (pre-ovulatory infertility), a period of fertility, and then several days just before the next menstruation that are infertile (post-ovulatory infertility). The first day of bleeding is considered day one of the menstrual cycle. In this safe period calculator, days 1 to 7 and day 21 to rest of the cycle is calculated as" safe period" or" safe days" for individuals with regular 26-32 days cycles. Plese read the method overview for more information. Proper use of safe period calculation method along with coitus interruptus (withdrawal method or pull-out method) is a suggested as a sin free or green family planning method for couples with self control over sexuality. Withdrawal method is not suggested for adolescents or those having casual sex. Others may use condoms during unsafe days to avoid serious and potentially life-threatening risks associated with the use of contraceptive pills.
1 person found this helpful
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Hi I had sex with girlfriend on 5th night and again we had a unprotected sex on 8th morning and she had taken i-pill on 8th evening her cycle date is 25th but she hadn't got her period yet. The i-pill is taken with 72 hours we had calculated the time.

BAMS, MD, Panchakrma
Ayurveda, Nashik
Hi
I had sex with girlfriend on 5th night and again we had a unprotected sex on 8th morning and she had taken i-pill ...
its common side effect of that pills . dont worry , dont take pill till next 6 month otherwise it will lead her to infertility in future
1 person found this helpful
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I am a 37 years old female. My eGFR is 83, serum creatinine is 0.92, urine microscopy is showing traces of albumin, pus cell 2-3, RBCs 1-2, epith cell 4-5.Kindly advice.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
I am a 37 years old female. My eGFR is 83, serum creatinine is 0.92, urine microscopy is showing traces of albumin, p...
It is not a major problem. There are slight alterations. It can be cured by Homoeopathic treatment. But need more details to know the exact reason. Also take a test for USG abdomen KUB. Then Consult. Till then take equisetum Q TDs.
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I and my bf having intercourse from last eight months, today I go for std test, reports are normal, in future it will same, or I need to check again?

MD-Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine & Surgery (BAMS)
Sexologist, Haldwani
Hello- If your partner is loyal enough to trust thn the status of the test can be sufficient enough in the future too.
1 person found this helpful
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I'm taking unwanted 72 after 5 days I will bleeding but after 1 week I had unprotected sex. So there is any chance of getting pregnant. And when the ovulation will be start.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FCPS, DGO, Diploma of the Faculty of Family Planning (DFFP)
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
I'm taking unwanted 72 after 5 days I will bleeding but after 1 week I had unprotected sex. So there is any chance of...
After unwanted 72 after gap of 5-7 days one gets withdrawal bleeding and then cyclicity of periods change meaning sex exposure after that can lead to pregnancy.
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Big Bad Blue Light

MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Big Bad Blue Light

Can you recall a time when you are lying in bed or in a dark room starting at your mobile phone screen or your laptop? Maybe you have an email to send just before you head to bed, or you have to finish that last stage of Candy Crush before you retire to bed?

The light that is emitted from your phone or your computer is called 'blue light' and it is harmful at night. Let's see why.

Your Normal Circadian Rhythm

For millions of years, the sun has been the primary source of light for all creatures on earth, including humans.

It is rare for us to require any artificial sources of light during the day, unless we are in a closed space that lacks windows. While daytime is great for light, night is a different story. How many of you can recall a time when we did not have mobile phones, advanced electronic gadgets or energy efficient light bulbs (compact fluorescent lights, or CFL), and relied on good old tube lights or low voltage light bulbs to illuminate our houses?

Our body has an internal clock that makes it active in the day time and sleepy at night. This circadian rhythm is responsible for keeping us alert and attentive, and relies heavily on external light. The average length of one circadian rhythm is 24 and one quarter hours (24 hours and 15 minutes). This varies in people who have late nights or those who work night shifts.

Our circadian rhythm depends on the release of melatonin, a hormone released in the brain that helps us sleep. In the daytime, the hormone levels are very low, while at night they are high and help you fall asleep. However, if you are exposed to light for long hours at night by staring at your phone or computer or even when sleeping with the light on, your melatonin levels will remain low. This could alter your circadian rhythm, confusing your brain and keeping you awake for longer.

Blame The Blue

There are various wavelengths of light emitted from electronic gadgets and energy saving light bulbs. However, blue light seems to be the most notorious one. Interestingly, CFLs contain about 25% of harmful blue light and LEDs contain about 35% of harmful blue light.

In one experiment that was conducted at Harvard University, it was found that exposure to blue light for 6.5 hours suppressed melatonin release for twice as long as the same duration for green light. It also shifted the circadian rhythm by 3 hours. In another experiment conducted in Toronto, people who were exposed to bright light but were wearing blue-blocking goggles had the same levels of melatonin compared to those who were in a dimly lit room.

Another study looking at teenagers using their mobile phones or gadgets in the night found that just one hour's exposure to blue light reduced melatonin levels by 23%. In two hours, it reduced further to 38%.

Similarly, red light seems to have almost no effect on the circadian rhythm as compared to blue light. Some people even advise using a dark red light as a bed light as it would not interrupt sleep patterns.

The Harmful Effects Of Blue Light

So what effect does blue light really have on the body? Sadly, it is not just about it affecting one's sleep. Excessive exposure to blue light has now been linked to weight gain, heart disease, depression and even some forms of cancer.

Melatonin has anti-cancer properties, and low levels of it at night can increase the risk of cancer. In one study, women who worked night shifts had low melatonin levels and a 50 - 75% greater risk of developing breast cancer in their lifetime.

People who are exposed to blue light at night have a lower level of insulin production. This means that any snacks eaten when staying up late are not broken down into glucose and used by the body. Instead, they are converted to fat and increase body weight. Not just that, the low insulin levels mean that diabetes can be a complication of blue light exposure.

2 people found this helpful

When my husband drop his sperm in vagina it comes out. Its right or wrong for pregnancy?

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
When my husband drop his sperm in vagina it comes out. Its right or wrong for pregnancy?
Hi lybrate-user. Semen coming out of vagina after intercourse is absolutely normal. Only one sperm is needed for pregnancy and the semen flowing out will not lead to any problem in conceiving.
1 person found this helpful
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Helo there. Good evening. I just want to know that if someone is pregnant than it is possible to her to get bleeding?

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Helo there. Good evening. I just want to know that if someone is pregnant than it is possible to her to get bleeding?
Menses bleeding does not occur but if pregnant and bleeding happens than we should rule out miscarriage
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