Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment
Dr. Anand Kumar  - Psychologist, Varanasi

Dr. Anand Kumar

87 (13 ratings)
Ph..D.

Psychologist, Varanasi

45 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Anand Kumar 87% (13 ratings) Ph..D. Psychologist, Varanasi
45 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Reviews
Feed

Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Anand Kumar
I have my psychological training from different parts of the world sine 1983. I provide psychological and mental diagnostic testing by latest equipments

Info

Education
Ph..D. - B.H.U. - 1973
Awards and Recognitions
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
...more
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by IAHP
Kashi Ratna Award
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Man of Achievement Award by Cambridge University
Kashi Ratna Award

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Anand Kumar

Asha Deep

B-2, Kashiraj Apartment, KamachhaVaranasi Get Directions
  4.4  (13 ratings)
...more

Asha Deep

B-2, Kashiraj ApartmentVaranasi Get Directions
  4.4  (13 ratings)
500 at clinic
...more
View All

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Anand Kumar

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Reviews

Popular
All Reviews
View More
View All Reviews

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Whenever I talk to anyone I feel stressed. In normal scenario also I become stressed while conversing. I think too much unnecessarily. While talking to any senior my heart beat increases and not only that it happens when I impart training to any group. I have habit of smoking 3-4 cigarettes daily. Please help me out to get rid of it.

M.Phil - Psychology
Psychologist, Chandigarh
Whenever I talk to anyone I feel stressed. In normal scenario also I become stressed while conversing. I think too mu...
Hi you have anxiety problems n you have little personality iasues. Need to work onto tjem with a specialized clinical psychologist where you live.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I having stammering problems my age 33 kindly suggest me please I need to speak fluent.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Jaipur
Hi, stammering might be due to some anxiety provoking condition as well as it can be treated. For that you have to visit a psychiatrist as well as speech therapist. You will definitely get help from them.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello sir have 20 years I have very lazy fully lazy how to increase concentration on study tips to concentrate on study.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem-solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Have a special place of learning, which should be well lit, with soft painted walls, well-ventilated, with no distractions. When you get bored, study by writing. If you repeat learning, at least, five to seven times, you will apparently remember for a longer time. Sit comfortably but do not slouch. The reading material should be of a fairly large print. Study at small intervals of about 40 minutes and then take a break or change the subject. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. There is a new exercise called Super Brain Yoga, which is done by holding the right earlobe with your left thumb and index finger, and the left earlobe with your right hand’s thumb and index finger. In this position, you must squat down and rise up and do this for five minutes every day. There is some memory enhancing techniques and study methods that your teacher will be able to guide you with. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely. In that case, I suggest that the family goes for counseling too. The following foods do help too: Blueberries, walnuts, turmeric, Spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, acorn squash, green tea, oily fish, boiled egg, turkey, apples, oatmeal, leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds, avocado, cinnamon, thyme, sunflower seeds, and red wine. Avoid sugar and junk food.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

How Ayurvedic Remedies Can Help To Treat Anxiety Disorder?

MD - Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Delhi
How Ayurvedic Remedies Can Help To Treat Anxiety Disorder?

The concept of alternative medicine is no more a novel proposition. It is a tried and tested way of dealing with physical as well as psychological problems. The aim of “Ayurveda” is to strike a corrective balance amongst three essential kinds of energies present in the human body. Ayurveda classifies these energies as 'Vata', 'Pitta', 'Kapha”. While “Vata” deals with bodily functions related to circulation of blood or breathing, “Pitta” primarily deals with metabolism. On the other hand, Kapha is concerned with regulation of growth in the varied organs and cells of your body. Anxiety disorder is a crushing problem if left unattended; Ayurvedic care and certain significant changes in your way of life can treat the condition.

Ayurveda asks you to adhere to the following guidelines to control anxiety disorder:

  1. Basil has wide ranging effects on your anxiety: Add basil leaves to a bowl of water and let it boil. Once the mixture cools down, drops of this juice can be poured down your nostrils. Basil is known to have calming effects on your mind. It is often advised for its ability to fight stress piling up in a human mind with every passing day. Chewing basil leaves can render the same benefits.
  2. Add these substances to your bath water: Bathing leads to relaxation and plays a key role in controlling your anxiety. You could be anxious due to familial issues or work related matters; a bath at the end of the day soothes your mind helping you to think clearly. Using ginger and baking soda in your bath water can further relieve you from being unnecessarily anxious.
  3. Drink your orange juice with a difference now: Orange juice, when taken in combination with honey, acts on an increased heart rate. It lowers down a person’s heart rate and also treats anxiety disorder. Oranges, as you know, are rich in vitamin C and can tackle stress by decreasing the effects of cortisol. Cortisol is better known as the stress hormone. So avoid sugar and try honey instead with your daily share of orange juice.
  4. Add almonds and saffron to your glass of milkThe one glass of milk that you drink regularly for nutrition and calcium can be made way more nourishing by adding saffron, almonds, nutmeg powder and ginger to it. This concoction helps in curing a frazzled nervous system thus, ridding you of anxiety disorder. Milk with almonds and saffron should be spiced to maintain the myelin sheath on each nerve of your body. This fatty layer does have a very calming influence on you. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an ayurveda.
5570 people found this helpful

Mental & Physical Stress - Can Homeopathy Help You Manage It?

BHMS, Post Graduate Diploma In Clinical Research (PGDCR)
Homeopath, Indore
Mental & Physical Stress - Can Homeopathy Help You Manage It?

Stress is the physical or emotional response of the body to an internal or external stimulus that upsets the equilibrium of the body. The stress hormones which are secreted in animals only during starvation, childbirth or torture are secreted in human beings all the time.

Medically, the mental or emotional aspects of stress are exceedingly important. Unhappiness, shock, illness, fear and much else can cause stress, which in turn can make people vulnerable to so many different illnesses both mental and physical. Stress and anxiety go hand in hand; every illness has a degree of anxiety. Even a predominantly physical illness like a sore throat can cause some stress. Certain illnesses have a very large stress component; particularly illnesses like depression, anxiety states and panic attacks.

A person’s tolerance of stress varies enormously, some people thrive on it; high-powered businessmen, for instance, who constantly have to make important decisions. Others buckle under quite small stresses and this may lead to illness. For the past two centuries, Homeopaths have concentrated on the interconnection between psychology and physiology.

To start with, the homeopathic enquiry is a very profound one and very often during a consultation various factors come to light, which may be creating some degree of anxiety or stress in the patient’s life. A discussion as to how they may be overcome, removed or mitigated, can often be very helpful. Discussion itself can be extremely therapeutic. In many cases, the patient is anxious or worried because nobody has taken time to talk to them.

The homeopathic physician spends a lot of time with patients. It is however very important that the practitioner should have a sound knowledge of conventional medical diagnosis because during the discussion signs and symptoms of disease which need conventional (sometimes urgent) treatment may emerge and a qualified doctor with a knowledge of diagnosis knows when to refer a patient urgently to the appropriate specialist and is able to do so.

Having carefully assessed the patient, taking into account not only his illness and how he is reacting to it, but his whole make-up, the homeopathic physician then tries to work out the patient’s constitutional remedy. If he succeeds in selecting the right remedy, the patient’s well­being, resistance, resilience, general health and ability to cope are enhanced and many stress symptoms can be helped.

There are a number of polychrests (medicines of many uses) often prescribed constitutionally, which are particularly appropriate for different sorts of worry and stress. The following I have used to good effect on many occasions: Lycopodium for the patient who greatly underestimates their abilities and anticipates every ordeal however small with pessimism; Silica patients are terrified of failure and Calc carbs are just too weak and exhausted to attempt anything! These medicines are only effective, of course, if they “fit” the patient so far as his whole constitution and make up is concerned.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4955 people found this helpful

Sir I have a problem. When I got tensed my sweat was released more from my body. And I got nerves. Then my brain doesn't work. And when I see my friends if they are done something great I feel under depression.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
Sir I have a problem. When  I got  tensed my sweat was released more from my body. And I got nerves. Then my brain do...
Your tension has to do with fear it seems. Your comparing yourself with your friends? achievements and your feeling like an under achiever is also not a good sign of your condition. That will indeed lead to depression. You must immediately meet with a counselor and deal with this fear soon. If it is of recent origin, you can easily pin point it and deal with it. But if it is from your past, then your parents will be able to help you and they could be useful when meeting the counselor. You are converting a fear into a sweat as an adaptation which will not working for you. The counselor will help you deal with fear and other emotions and when that is sorted out many of your problems will disappear. You have to be cooperative and follow all the instructions. You are very unique and there is no one like you, ever, and there will be no one like you in the future, ever! So do not compare yourself with others: there will always be someone better than you and you need to accept that. If they have made good with an opportunity that you also had then learn what they did different and you can do the same: learning will happen all your life even unto death. Do not compete with others to lose but to appreciate and learn.
6 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I'm 22 years old male. I had been on a dose of soltus 50 for the previous four months but a few days ago my doctor changed my meds to Salmiride od 50 mg. Both of them are amisulpride 50 mg. What is the difference and why did my doctor change it? And also what is the difference between sustained release tablets and controlled release tablets?

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
Doctor can change them to alter the same drug having some kind of resistance or drug duration change as desired based on clinical evaluation. It is common and wise to follow the same. All the best
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Please suggest me how to tackle school refusal problem in my seven year old son. He is good at studies, sports and a very active child but does not want to go school. This problem has been there since he was going to nursery. He says he wants to be with mummy papa and doest not like school. Although he never complains about teachers.

M.Phil - Clinical Psychology, M.Sc Psychology (Clinical), BA - Hons Psychology
Psychologist, Delhi
Please suggest me how to tackle school refusal problem in my seven year old son. He is good at studies, sports and a ...
Dear Lybrate user, School refusal is a very common phenomenon seen among young children. It is imperative to know the reason why your child refuses to go to the school. Does it happen everyday or only sometimes? How do you as parents respond to the child's refusal to go to school? How is the overall parent-child relationship, family environment and environment at school? Questions like these need to be asked for a better understanding of the whole situation. Hence, I advise you to meet a Clinical Psychologist in person along with your child and address the issue. - Till then, try and talk to your child as to why he/she refuses to go to school? Listen to your child patiently and acknowledge his/her feelings appropriately. Make him/her feel assured and understood through your discussion. - In addition to this, it is extremely important for the parents to maintain their calm and handle the situation properly when your child does not want to go to school. Instead of shouting at your child or even hitting him/her try to maintain your calm so that it does not aggravate the situation and negatively reinforce the problem behaviour. - Positively reinforce your child with a hug, a kiss or with something that he/she likes on the days when he/she goes to school. Make it clear to them that this is a reward that they have earned by going to school so that they also understand that getting these rewards is contingent/dependent on their school going behaviour. It will instil a sense of responsibility in your child for his/her behaviours and the consequences they get. - These need to be followed consistently and always fulfil your promises to the child. These are just some ways to handle it slightly better, for proper management consult a Clinical or Child Psychologist in person. Best wishes.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I fear dogs a lot. The very sight of it makes me afraid. I am walking and the dog is sitting on the edge those are quite anxious moments. What should I do? Dogs habit of smelling feels me that I should run (which I always do and luckily I escapes. Please help.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I fear dogs a lot. The very sight of it makes me afraid. I am walking and the dog is sitting on the edge those are qu...
Determining the Extent of Your Fear Analyze your symptoms. Specific phobias, including cynophobia (the fear of dogs), may include some of the following symptoms. Do you need to be in the presence of a dog, or can a photo or story of a dog trigger your symptoms? And, is it the dog itself that causes the fear, or something the dog is doing? For example, some people are fearful of barking, but are okay if a dog is silent. •Feeling an imminent sense of danger. •Feeling the need to escape or flee. •Heart racing, sweating, trembling or shaking, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea, dizziness, or chills. •Feeling like what is happening is unreal. •Feeling like you’re losing control or going crazy. •Feeling like you might die. Determine if you change your life because of your fear. Unfortunately fears can be so severe that we feel the best way to make them go away is to avoid them completely. While a fear of flying, for example, may be quite easy to avoid by simply never flying, dogs are another story. Ask yourself if you do the following things in order to avoid being around dogs. If you do, there’s a good chance you have cynophobia. •Do you avoid hanging out with specific people because they have a dog? •Do you change your route specifically to avoid a house or neighborhood that has a dog? •Do you avoid speaking to certain people because they talk about their dogs? Understand there is a way to overcome this fear. While it is possible to overcome your fear of dogs, keep in mind that you need to be patient. It won’t go away immediately, it will take work on your part. You may want to consider seeking professional help from a therapist who can walk you through the process of overcoming your fear. Consider writing about your fear in a journal. Write down specific past memories that you have about dogs, and how you felt during those experiences. Learn relaxation and meditation techniques to help keep your calm and help control your anxiety. Break your fear into smaller sections to overcome; don’t think you need to tackle the whole thing all in one go. Have faith in yourself that you will get over your fear of dogs. And accept any mistakes you make along the way. Conducting Cognitive Restructuring Understand what cognitive restructuring is. Many phobias, including cynophobia, are based on how your brain comprehends a specific situation, rather than the actual situation itself. For example, you’re not likely afraid of the actual dog in front of you, but rather, you’re brain is interpreting the dog as being a threat which is then causing you to be fearful. Cognitive restructuring helps you to identify these thoughts, understand that they are irrational, and slowly help you to rethink (or reframe) your thoughts about a specific situation (i.e. Dogs). It is important to go into cognitive restructuring with an open and willing mind. You need to accept the fact that your fear is probably not based on rational thought, and as such, means that you can train yourself to think differently. If you go into this type of treatment pessimistically or with the belief that you’re being completely reasonable in your fears, you will make the process much harder to overcome. Think about events that trigger your fearful thoughts. The first step to overcoming your fear is to identify what is causing the fear in the first place. This may include thinking and talking about your past experiences with dogs, and trying to figure out what may have started the phobia in the first place. It may also include narrowing down the exact trigger that causes your fear. Is it dogs in general that cause you to be fearful, or do you become fearful when a dog does something specific (i.e. Growls, barks, jumps up, runs, etc.). Analyze your existing beliefs about your trigger events. Once you have a solid understanding of the specific events that trigger your phobia, you need to evaluate what you are thinking when this fear occurs. What are you telling yourself? How are you interpreting the trigger event in your thoughts? What are your specific beliefs about that event the moment it is happening? Continue writing your memories and thoughts in your journal. At this point start recording the reasons why you think the events triggered your fear. Write down as many of your beliefs as you can remember. Analyze your beliefs and thoughts to determine if they include any of the following: •All or Nothing — do you view ALL dogs as bad, no matter what? Or do you categorize dogs differently depending on some type of feature? E.g. ”I can’t be friends with anyone who has a dog.” •Should, Must, Ought — do you see a dog and automatically assume you have to be afraid of it? Do you feel like you have no other choice in the matter? E.g. ”My mom said I should never trust a dog.” •Overgeneralizing — have you tried to overcome your fear before and weren’t able to, and now you assume you’ll never be able to overcome your fear of dogs? E.g. ”I tried to be near dogs before and it didn’t work. I have no choice but to be afraid of dogs.” •Mental Filter — do you automatically draw conclusions about dogs based only on one or two previous experiences with dogs? E.g. “That dog attacked me when I was 3, all dogs are bad and will attack people if they get the chance.” •Discounting the Positive — do you ignore something good that happened because you can’t believe it’ll happen again? E.g. ”Sure, I was able to sit beside that one dog, but he was old and sick and didn’t look like he could walk, let alone attack me.” •Jumping to Conclusions — do you see or hear a dog and automatically draw a conclusion about what’s going to happen? E.g. ”That’s a pit bull, they’re awful and nasty dogs that can’t be trained properly.” Look at the feelings and behaviours that result from your beliefs. At this point you should have a better understanding of what triggers your fear of dogs, and the thoughts and beliefs you have about dogs when that trigger happens. Now it’s time to analyze how these thoughts and beliefs actually make your feel and behave. In other words, what are the consequences of your fear? What is the fear ‘making’ you do? Continue writing in your journal. At this stage you’ll want to include your reactions (both internally and externally) to the events that triggered your fear, and the beliefs that contributed to that fear. Examples of reactions might be: •You were walking down your street and encountered a dog in the yard of a specific home. Afterwards you never walked down that street again. •Your neighbour has a dog that they let into the backyard to play, so you never go in your own backyard in case your neighbour’s dog is outside. •You refuse to go to a friend’s house because they got a dog, and you can’t hang out with them if they bring the dog along. Investigate if evidence exists to back-up your beliefs. You should now be at the point where you’ve analyzed what triggers your fear, why your fear is triggered, and how you react to that fear. Now it’s time to analyze if there’s any actual proof to back-up the reasons why you’re fearful of dogs. Think of this part of the process as you needing to be able to prove to your therapist (or yourself) that your fears are perfectly rational. Use your journal to write down each of your beliefs and the associated evidence you have as to why that belief is reasonable and rational. If you’re a really logical person, can you find any scientific proof to back up your beliefs? For example, you have the belief that all dogs are going to attack you no matter what. Why do you think this is true? Have you been attacked by every single dog you’ve ever encountered? Does everyone else get attacked by every dog they encounter? Why would people own dogs as pets if they were constantly attacked? Develop a rational explanation for the trigger event. At this point you have tried to prove your fear of dogs is perfectly reasonable and found that you can’t find any evidence to back-up your beliefs. In fact, you’ve probably found evidence of the complete opposite. You now need to think about the beliefs that are causing your fear and work with your therapist to develop rational explanations for your beliefs. These rational explanations will start to make sense, and make you realize that your resulting fear doesn’t make sense. While this may sound easy, this is going to be the hardest step in your process to overcome your fear of dogs. Our beliefs can be entrenched in our minds so deeply that it can take some time (and convincing) that they make no sense. After all, your irrational beliefs may have helped you avoid bad situations, so what’s wrong with them? For example, you have a belief that all dogs attack. You weren’t able to find any evidence to back up that belief, so why do you have it? Maybe your belief is based on the fact that you saw a movie when you were 7 (that you shouldn’t have watched) that had dogs attacking and killing people. After you watched that movie you started to fear dogs based on the assumption that the movie was 100% accurate. In reality, it was just a movie, and there was no truth to it. And if you think about it, you’ve never actually seen a dog attack anyone. Move to the next step in your recovery. While you’ve come a long way at this point, you’re not finished. Even if you’re able to convince yourself that your fears have no rational explanation and there’s no good reason to feel the way you do, you’re not actually “cured. In a way you’ve completed the theoretical aspect of your therapy, now you have to complete the practical aspect of your therapy. At this stage you need to practice being around dogs. First, you need to learn how to relax when your fear or anxiety occurs so you don’t set yourself back. Second, you need to gradually expose yourself to dogs (in different ways) until you can feel relaxed when they’re around. Learning Relaxation Techniques Understand the different types of relaxation techniques. There are quite a few different types of relaxation techniques that you can learn to help with your fear and anxiety. They include, but are not limited to, the following: autogenic relaxation; progressive muscle relaxation; visualization; deep breathing; hypnosis; massage; meditation; tai chi; yoga; biofeedback; and music and art therapy. •Autogenic relaxation is a technique where you use visual images and body awareness, while repeating words or terms, to help relax and reduce muscle tension. •Progressive muscle relaxation is a technique where you tense and relax each muscle in your body in order to get a sense of what each one feels like in both a tense and relaxed state. •Visualization is a technique where you visualize specific settings that make you feel relaxed and calm (i.e. Forest, beach with waves, etc.). •Deep breathing is a technique where you purposely breathe deeply from your abdomen in order to release tension and reverse hyperventilation. •Biofeedback is a technique where you learn to control each of your body’s functions, like your heart rate or breathing. Practice deep breathing relaxation. When you’re anxious or afraid you may react by breathing too quickly and hyperventilating. Hyperventilating can intensify your feelings of anxiety and fear and make the situation worse. Breathing deeply can help you relax, reduce your tension, and make you feel less anxious. Follow these steps to relax using deep breathing: •Sit or stand somewhere where you’re comfortable and keep your back straight. Put one of your hands on your chest and put your other hand on your stomach. •Take one slow deep breath in through your nose while counting to four. The hand on your stomach will rise while the hand on your chest shouldn’t move very much. •Hold your breath while counting to seven. •Exhale through your mouth while you count to eight. Push out as much air as you can using your abdominal muscles. This means the hand on your stomach should move downwards, and the hand on your chest shouldn’t move very much. •Repeat these steps until you feel calmer and relaxed. Perform progressive muscle relaxation. Anxious people also tend to be tense, even when they think they’re relaxed. Progressive muscle relaxation can help you distinguish between relaxed and tense muscles so you actually know what it feels like to relax. Practice the following steps twice a day until you really feel it working. •Find a quiet place where you can sit comfortably with your eyes closed. Remove your shoes. •Allow your body to go as loose as you can and take 5 deep breaths. •Select a specific muscle group to begin with (i.e. Your left foot) and focus on those muscles. •Work each of these muscles groups: individual feet; lower leg and foot; entire leg; individual hands; entire arm; buttocks; stomach; chest; neck and shoulders; mouth; eyes; and forehead. •Take one slow, deep breath while tensing the muscles you’ve selected for 5 seconds. Make sure you can feel the tension in your muscles before you move on. •Allow all the tension to leave the muscles you’ve selected while exhaling. •Pay close attention to how these muscles feels when tense and when relaxed. •Stay relaxed for 15 seconds, then select another muscle group and repeat the same steps. Try guided visualization. Using visualization to relax is exactly what it sounds like — you visualize something that you find extremely relaxing in order to reduce your anxiety and reduce your fears. A guided visualization is where you listen to a recording where someone talks you through the process step-by-step. There are many free guided visualizations available online, some with background music or sound effects to help make the process seem more real. Guided visualization recordings will provide the instructions on how to prepare yourself and what to do. They will also vary in length, so you can select the ones that work best for you. Working with Exposure Therapy Develop an exposure plan. The reason you learned relaxation techniques was to keep yourself calm while slowly building up your exposure to dogs. But before you start allowing dogs to be in your presence, you need to develop a plan. This plan should include each step you’re going to go through between now (no dogs) and actually being in their presence. Your plan should be customized for your particular type of fears, and the fearful situations you personally experience. The list should be written in order of least fearful to most fearful so you work your way up to conquering your most fearful situation. An example of a plan to overcome your fear of dogs is as follows: •Step 1 - draw a dog on a piece of paper. •Step 2 - read about dogs. •Step 3 - look at photos of dogs. •Step 4 - look at videos of dogs. •Step 5 - look at dogs through a closed window. •Step 6 - look at dogs through a partially opened window. •Step 7 - look at dogs through an open window. •Step 8 - look at dogs through a doorway. •Step 9 - look at dogs from outside the doorway. •Step 10 - look at a dog (who is on a leash) in the next room. •Step 11 - look at a dog (who is on a leash) in the same room. •Step 12 - sit beside a dog. •Step 13 - pet a dog. Create and practice using an anxiety distress scale. Use the scale to measure your level of anxiety, with 0 being totally relaxed and 100 being the most fear/anxiety/discomfort you have ever experienced. This is a helpful tool for measuring how your distress levels change over time. The anxiety distress scale can also help you decide when it's time for you to move to the next step of your exposure plan. Be patient and take your time. Don't move to the next step too quickly. Engage the help of a trusted friend with a dog. At some point in your plan you will have to place yourself in the presence of an actual dog. You need this dog to be handled by a competent and trustful person, and the dog needs to be predictable and well-trained. Talk to the dog’s owner in advance of executing your plan and explain to them what you’re trying to accomplish. They should be patient and understanding as they may need to simply sit there with their dog for a while as your acclimatize to the dog’s presence. It is not a good idea to use a puppy, even if you think they’re cuter and not as violent. Puppies are not well-trained and can be quite unpredictable. This can cause them to do something unexpected in your presence which may only exacerbate your fear. Eventually, if you’re able to, have your friend teach you basic commands for the dog so you can control the dog yourself. Being in control of the dog may further help you to alleviate your fears once you realize you have the ability to direct their actions. Start facing your fear of dogs. Start with the first item on your plan and carry it out. Repeatedly carry it out until you feel less anxious and fearful doing it. If the step you’re doing allows you to stay in one place (i.e. Watch dogs though a window), slowly expand the length of time you perform the activity as well. Use the relaxation techniques you practiced to help keep yourself calm. Use your journal to keep track of your progress. Write down each attempt you make and how it went. Rate your level of anxiety and fear before and after each attempt. Remember that your exposure to dogs should be planned, prolonged and repeated. Don’t feel you need to rush. Take your time on each step of your plan until you feel comfortable moving onto the next step. Practice regularly. This part of the recovery process is going to be the hardest you’ll have to go through, but the only way it’s going to be successful is if you keep it up. Make a schedule where you practice on a regular basis. If at all possible, practice daily. Reward yourself for the progress you make. If needed, build rewards into your plan so you have an extra goal to work towards for each step. Should you need any further assistance. Please feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed