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Ulcerative Colitis Health Feed

Ulcerative Colitis - Tips To Tackle It!

Ulcerative Colitis - Tips To Tackle It!

Living with ulcerative colitis can be very challenging. Patients of this disease will have to deal with pain in the abdomen and several digestion related issues in their daily lives. It is known to adversely impact the digestive tract. There can be extreme discomfort at the time of flare-ups. A patient can find life extremely difficult while dealing with symptoms like abdominal pain, fever, weight loss, and chronic diarrhea.

What is Ulcerative colitis (UC)?
It is a serious inflammatory disease. It is caused due to inflammatory bowel movements in the digestive tract. It can affect your daily life adversely. The worst part about this disease is that it relapses in the individual. It is characterized by flare-ups. You need to know fist what is an UC flare-up. Well, it is a term to refer to an exaggerated condition in the disease. It refers to a state when things turn worse. These flare-ups can be caused due to a number of factors. Some of these include:

  1. Side-effect of certain medicines
  2. Hormonal imbalance, especially during pregnancy
  3. Sudden withdrawal from medication
  4. Any infection or other medical condition

How to deal with the UC flare-ups?

  1. Doctors often prescribe corticosteroids to deal with the flare-ups. Some of the most common drugs are Prednisone and budesonide.
  2. Doctors prescribe the intake of steroids, 5-Aminosalicylates, antibiotics, and biologics.
  3. Lifestyle changes are helpful in treating this disease. You can work towards detoxification and de-stressing yourself to get rid of the flare-ups. Take up some exercises, meditation and Yoga for best results.
  4. You can also control chronic diarrhea by keeping a check on what you eat. You should avoid eating fibrous diet. Fibres are tough to digest for patients with UC. You must maintain proper hygiene as well to stay away from diarrhea.

Surgical Management of Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory disease of the colon and rectum limited to the mucosa, and may vary in severity from a mild intermittent disease to an acute fulminant and potentially fatal disease requiring urgent surgery. Management of ulcerative colitis depends on severity, extent, and duration of the disease, response and tolerance to medication, patient age and comorbidity as well as patient preference.

Surgery plays an important role in the management of UC both because of the premalignant nature of the disease, and because of the periodic failure of medical management. The underlying rationale for surgical treatment of the disease is that the disease is confined to the colon and rectum, and therefore proctocolectomy is curative. The goal of surgical therapy for ulcerative colitis is to remove the disease with as little alteration of normal physiological functions and lifestyle as possible.

Four surgical options exist for patients with ulcerative colitis and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The surgical choices are:

  1. Proctocolectomy and Brooke ileostomy.
  2. Abdominal colectomy and ilcorectal anastomosis.
  3. Proctocolectomy and Kock pouch.
  4. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA).

The choice of operation requires consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of each option and must be tailored to an individual patient's needs and circumstances. Important factors to be considered in the choice of operation include the indication for surgery, age, associated medical conditions, body habitues, and quality of the anal sphincter. Extensive preoperative education is required which should include discussion with a specialized Gastroenterologist.

Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Know Types Of it!

Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Know Types Of it!

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition whereby tiny abscesses and ulcers are formed on the inner lining of the large intestine, or on the colon or rectum. These ulcers may burst frequently resulting in diarrhea and bloody stools. This disease may also be responsible for causing anemia as well as harsh abdominal pain.

Ulcerative colitis normally alternates periodically from flaring up to receding quickly. These periods of remission can either last for weeks or maybe, even for years at a stretch. They are however, not permanent and although the disease may seem to have disappeared completely, it can soon show up again in no time. Usually beginning in the rectum, it can, by and by, spread rapidly to other parts of the colon. If it is, however, limited only to the rectum, then it is more commonly referred to as ulcerative proctitis.

Surgery is generally obligatory and mandatory when it comes to treating ulcerative colitis. If surgery is not performed, you may suffer long-lasting side effects, including cancer and colon rupture. Here are the different types of surgery that you may undergo:

1. Colectomy: This is done when the entire colon needs to be removed and is usually performed to eliminate the perils of acquiring colon cancer.
2. Proctocolectomy: This concerns the total removal of both colon and rectum, and is usually the standard procedure when dealing with ulcerative colitis.
3. Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis: If the treatment does not require a permanent stoma, and if you can still manage to let out stool from your anus, then this surgery, also called restorative proctolectomy, would be most appropriate. Here, both colon and rectum are removed but at the same time, the small intestine is utilized to form an internal reservoir, called a J-pouch, which is linked to the anus and can hereafter serve as your new rectum.
 

1463 people found this helpful

Ulcerative Colitis - How To Manage It?

Ulcerative Colitis - How To Manage It?

Living with ulcerative colitis can be very challenging. Patients of this disease will have to deal with pain in the abdomen and several digestive related issues in their daily lives. It is known to adversely impact the digestive tract. There can be extreme discomfort at the time of flare-ups. A patient can find life extremely difficult while dealing with symptoms like abdominal pain, fever, weight loss, and chronic diarrhea.

What is Ulcerative colitis (UC)?
It is a serious inflammatory disease. It is caused due to inflammatory bowel movements in the digestive tract. It can affect your daily life adversely. The worst part about this disease is that it relapses in the individual. It is characterized by flare-ups. You need to know fist what is an UC flare-up. Well, it is a term to refer to an exaggerated condition in the disease. It refers to a state when things turn worse. These flare-ups can be caused due to a number of factors. Some of these include:

  1. Side-effect of certain medicines
  2. Hormonal imbalance, especially during pregnancy
  3. Sudden withdrawal from medication
  4. Any infection or other medical condition

How to deal with the UC flare-ups?

  1. Doctors often prescribe corticosteroids to deal with the flare-ups. Some of the most common drugs are Prednisone and budesonide.
  2. Doctors prescribe the intake of steroids, 5-Aminosalicylates, antibiotics, and biologics.
  3. Lifestyle changes are helpful in treating this disease. You can work towards detoxification and de-stressing yourself to get rid of the flare-ups. Take up some exercises, meditation and Yoga for best results.
  4. You can also control chronic diarrhea by keeping a check on what you eat. You should avoid eating fibrous diet. Fibres are tough to digest for patients with UC. You must maintain proper hygiene as well to stay away from diarrhea.

Surgical Management of Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory disease of the colon and rectum limited to the mucosa and may vary in severity from a mild intermittent disease to an acute fulminant and potentially fatal disease requiring urgent surgery. Management of ulcerative colitis depends on severity, extent, and duration of the disease, response and tolerance to medication, patient age and comorbidity as well as patient preference.

Surgery plays an important role in the management of UC both because of the premalignant nature of the disease, and because of the periodic failure of medical management. The underlying rationale for surgical treatment of the disease is that the disease is confined to the colon and rectum, and therefore proctocolectomy is curative. The goal of surgical therapy for ulcerative colitis is to remove the disease with as little alteration of normal physiological functions and lifestyle as possible.

Four surgical options exist for patients with ulcerative colitis and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.

The surgical choices are:

  1. Proctocolectomy and Brooke ileostomy.
  2. Abdominal colectomy and ilcorectal anastomosis.
  3. Proctocolectomy and Kock pouch.
  4. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA).

The choice of operation requires consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of each option and must be tailored to an individual patient's needs and circumstances. Important factors to be considered in the choice of operation include the indication for surgery, age, associated medical conditions, body habitus, and quality of the anal sphincter. Extensive preoperative education is required which should include a discussion with a specialized Gastroenterologist.

3 people found this helpful

Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Know Forms Of It!

Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Know Forms Of It!

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition whereby tiny abscesses and ulcers are formed on the inner lining of the large intestine, or on the colon or rectum. These ulcers may burst frequently resulting in diarrhea and bloody stools. This disease may also be responsible for causing anemia as well as harsh abdominal pain.
Ulcerative colitis normally alternates periodically from flaring up to receding quickly. These periods of remission can either last for weeks or maybe, even for years at a stretch. They are, however, not permanent and although the disease may seem to have disappeared completely, it can soon show up again in no time. Usually beginning in the rectum, it can by and by, spread rapidly to other parts of the colon. If it is, however, limited only to the rectum, then it is more commonly referred to as ulcerative proctitis.

Surgery is generally obligatory and mandatory when it comes to treating ulcerative colitis. If surgery is not performed, you may suffer long-lasting side effects, including cancer and colon rupture.

Here are the different types of surgery that you may undergo:

1. Colectomy: This is done when the entire colon needs to be removed and is usually performed to eliminate the perils of acquiring colon cancer.
2. Proctocolectomy: This concerns the total removal of both colon and rectum, and is usually the standard procedure when dealing with ulcerative colitis.
3. Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis: If the treatment does not require a permanent stoma, and if you can still manage to let out stool from your anus, then this surgery, also called restorative proctolectomy, would be most appropriate. Here, both colon and rectum are removed but at the same time, the small intestine is utilized to form an internal reservoir, called a J-pouch, which is linked to the anus and can hereafter serve as your new rectum.
 

951 people found this helpful

Hi Sir, I have ulcerative colitis from 2 years and taking dxn product from one year but I am not felling well I have the following problem too much gastric problem sometimes it stools felling come and only just like mucus, blood clotting come.

With the age of 24 this much gastritis is not good it has some perfect reasons for having it its the perfect problem of gi tract deformity so consult good ayurvedic physician it will cured for lifetime with out any side effects.
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Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Types Of It!

Ulcerative Colitis Surgery - Types Of It!

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition whereby tiny abscesses and ulcers are formed on the inner lining of the large intestine, or on the colon or rectum. These ulcers may burst frequently resulting in diarrhea and bloody stools. This disease may also be responsible for causing anemia as well as harsh abdominal pain.

Ulcerative colitis normally alternates periodically from flaring up to receding quickly. These periods of remission can either last for weeks or maybe, even for years at a stretch. They are however, not permanent and although the disease may seem to have disappeared completely, it can soon show up again in no time. Usually beginning in the rectum, it can, by and by, spread rapidly to other parts of the colon. If it is, however, limited only to the rectum, then it is more commonly referred to as ulcerative proctitis.

Surgery is generally obligatory and mandatory when it comes to treating ulcerative colitis. If surgery is not performed, you may suffer long-lasting side effects, including cancer and colon rupture. Here are the different types of surgery that you may undergo:

1. Colectomy: This is done when the entire colon needs to be removed and is usually performed to eliminate the perils of acquiring colon cancer.
2. Proctocolectomy: This concerns the total removal of both colon and rectum, and is usually the standard procedure when dealing with ulcerative colitis.
3. Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis: If the treatment does not require a permanent stoma, and if you can still manage to let out stool from your anus, then this surgery, also called restorative proctolectomy, would be most appropriate. Here, both colon and rectum are removed but at the same time, the small intestine is utilized to form an internal reservoir, called a J-pouch, which is linked to the anus and can hereafter serve as your new rectum.
 

3113 people found this helpful

Ulcerative Colitis - How To Avert It?

Ulcerative Colitis - How To Avert It?

Ulcerative Colitis is one of the severe and chronic forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) that can throw life in jeopardy. The condition that mainly affects the rectum and the large intestine can cause severe inflammation, ulceration, and abscess formation. The ulceration or the inflammation of the colon and the rectum left unattended for too long can give rise to deleterious consequences including damage and perforation of the colon, osteoporosis. Various studies also suggest that ulcerative colitis can increase the risk of a person suffering from colon cancer.

Like most of the IBD, there is no definite cure for ulcerative colitis. The illness is a chronic condition and can flare up or recur at any point in time. Though medications may help to control the damage and the complications triggered by ulcerative colitis, surgery may be essential in case of

  • Severe damage to the colon.
  • The nonsurgical treatments could do little to improve the conditions.
  • There is an increased risk of colon cancer.
  • Ulcerative colitis has resulted in Toxic megacolon (a life-threatening condition where the large intestinal muscles have dilated with some swelling).
  • There are extreme discomfort and bleeding.

Surgeries to deal with Ulcerative Colitis

  • In the case of Ulcerative Colitis, the nature of the surgery depends on the extent to which the colon or the rectum or both have been affected and damaged.
  • In the case of extensive damage with a high risk of colon cancer, the surgeon may perform Proctocolectomy or colectomy
  • Colectomy may involve
    • Removal of all of the colon- Total Colectomy
    • Removal of the diseased part of the colon- Partial Colectomy.
  • Following the excision, the surgeon may carry out necessary rearrangements to reconnect the remaining portion of the colon to the abdomen through an opening known as stroma (the procedure is known as colostomy).
  • In the case of Total Colectomy, the small intestine will be connected to the abdomen by a process known as Ileostomy.
  • Proctocolectomy involves the removal of both the rectum and colon to avoid further aggravation.
  • Following the proctocolectomy, the surgeon may carry out Ileoanal Anastomosis (Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis). In this procedure, a pouch is created using a small part of the small intestine. This pouch is then connected to the anus to help in the elimination of the wastes.

General precautionary measures to control Ulcerative Colitis
Making healthy lifestyle and dietary modifications can go a long way to control ulcerative colitis and the associated symptoms.

  • Spicy foods can worsen the incidence of ulcerative colitis. Enrich your diet with lots of fruits, vegetables (squash, avocados, fish (especially salmon and tuna), meat, dairy products, olive oil, walnuts, flaxseed oil, almonds.
  • Make sure the diet is a low-fiber diet.
  • Avoid alcoholic and caffeinated drinks and beverages, foods high in sulfur content, refined sugar.
  • Research suggests stress and lack of physical activities can aggravate the ulcerative colitis. Mediation and daily exercise can produce fruitful results.
  • Make sure your sleep is not compromised (6-8 hours daily).
3157 people found this helpful

Hi sir, my brother age is 42 suffering ulceration colitis for last 11/2 year. He is taking medicine budez cr capsule 3 times before food, mesacol od 1200 mg 3 tab after food, probiotic capsules 2 tablet, dozep50 also for sleeplessness. Still he is feeling pain in stomach and going bathroom min. 10 times falling blood every time, always feeling fever. We are very upset kindly suggest or refer doctors/hospital/diet please Thanks in advance

Please consult medical gastroenterologist in your area. If there is not much response to above stated treatment, immunosuppression and monoclonal antibodies is the next possible option. Some individuals who do not respond to this as well are candidates for surgery i.e. Colectomy, where affected portion of colon is removed.
3 people found this helpful
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Ulcerative Colitis - How To Tackle It?

Ulcerative Colitis  - How To Tackle It?

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition whereby tiny abscesses and ulcers are formed on the inner lining of the large intestine, or on the colon or rectum. These ulcers may burst frequently resulting in diarrhea and bloody stools. This disease may also be responsible for causing anemia as well as harsh abdominal pain.
Ulcerative colitis normally alternates periodically from flaring up to receding quickly. These periods of remission can either last for weeks or maybe, even for years at a stretch. They are, however, not permanent and although the disease may seem to have disappeared completely, it can soon show up again in no time. Usually beginning in the rectum, it can, by and by, spread rapidly to other parts of the colon. If it is, however, limited only to the rectum, then it is more commonly referred to as ulcerative proctitis.

Surgery is generally obligatory and mandatory when it comes to treating ulcerative colitis. If surgery is not performed, you may suffer long-lasting side effects, including cancer and colon rupture.

Here are the different types of surgery that you may undergo:

1. Colectomy: This is done when the entire colon needs to be removed and is usually performed to eliminate the perils of acquiring colon cancer.
2. Proctocolectomy: This concerns the total removal of both colon and rectum, and is usually the standard procedure when dealing with ulcerative colitis.
3. Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis: If the treatment does not require a permanent stoma, and if you can still manage to let out stool from your anus, then this surgery, also called restorative proctolectomy, would be most appropriate. Here, both colon and rectum are removed but at the same time, the small intestine is utilized to form an internal reservoir, called a J-pouch, which is linked to the anus and can hereafter serve as your new rectum.
 

3030 people found this helpful

Ulcerative Surgery - When Is It Required?

Ulcerative Surgery - When Is It Required?

What Is Ulcerative Colitis?
Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, inflammatory condition of the colon and the rectum. It affects the mucosal lining of the large intestine (colon) and the rectum. The rectum is present just above the anus.
In this condition, patients have ulcers and abscesses in their colon and rectum.

Symptoms are seen periodically. The symptoms are severe pain in the abdomen, blood in stools and diarrhea. Anemia is seen due to decreased healthy red blood cells as a consequence of bleeding in stools.

When is surgery required?

  • The colon has ruptured
  • There is extensive bleeding
  • The treatment results in severe side effects affecting the patient's health
  • Drug therapy fails to provide results
  • When it progresses to colon cancer
  • Surgery for Ulcerative colitis

There are 2 types of surgeries:

  1. Colectomy: Surgery performed to remove the entire colon
  2. Proctocolectomy: Surgery is conducted to remove both the colon and rectum. It is considered as the standard treatment for ulcerative colitis.

Procedures for the surgery

  1. Ileostomy: The entire colon and rectum are removed and the surgeon creates an opening or stoma in the abdominal wall particularly below the waist. Stoma allows waste from the intestines to exit the body. The tip of the lower small intestine is brought through the stoma. An external bag, or pouch, is attached to the stoma. This is called a permanent ileostomy. Stools pass through this opening and collect in the pouch. The pouch must be worn at all times. Before an ileostomy, the surgeon will perform a proctocolectomy. They will perform the ileostomy in the hospital, and the patient receives general anesthesia.
  2. Ileal Pouch Anal Anastomosis (IPAA): This is also called a J-pouch. This is a procedure that does not require a permanent stoma. The patient is still able to eliminate stool through the anus. A pouch is constructed at the end of the ileum and attached to the anus. This is called a J- pouch. As with the ileostomy, the patient will need a proctocolectomy before an IPAA. An IPAA is done in a hospital, and the patient will receive general anesthesia.

Side-effects
Some people experience incontinence after the surgery. Medications may help control the function of the pouch.
Some women may become infertile after the procedure.

Recovery after Surgery
Both sets of the procedure will require a four-to-six-week recovery period.

  1. Keep your diet healthy: A healthy diet is essential because good nutrition can help the body heal faster and help avoid post-operation health issues. Absorption of nutrients can be an issue after these surgeries, so eating well will help in maintaining the proper level of nutrients.
  2. Keep yourself hydrated: Hydration is important for overall health, especially for digestive health. Drinking six to eight glasses of water per day is recommended.
  3. Manage your stress: Anxiety or emotional stress can cause stomach issues, which can aggravate the complaint.
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