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Developmental Delay Tips

Motor Developmental Delay!

Dr. Arpan Kumar 90% (14 ratings)
Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT), Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi

Reflexology and Developmental Disabilities

Dr. Meena Sharma 85% (30 ratings)
M.Phil - Psychology, Ph. D - Psychology
Psychologist, Delhi
Reflexology and Developmental Disabilities

Developmental disabilities include autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, mental retardation, learning difficulties and other developmenatl delays. Children with these disabilities indicate difficulties in the form of writing, reading, speaking, playing, understanding instructions, hitting, kicking, screaming, swearing, repetitive, rocking, and others. These challenging behaviors requires appropriate psychological assessment and management. With assessment requires numerous behavioral, intelligence and developmental tools. Following assessment appropriate techniques utilized to manage challenging behavior using psychological techniques. Recently new technique came into effect ie., Reflexology which work in other form and with limited sessions. It is one of the alternative therapy which is simple, safe and efective also. Therapist works with reflex area on the feets, hands and head. This techniques proves to be effective in reducing stress, emotional, agressive and behavioral problems of children effectively.

2 people found this helpful

Developmental milestones!

Dr. Arpan Kumar 90% (14 ratings)
Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT), Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi
Developmental milestones!

Developmental milestones!

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

Dr. Gaurav Khera 90% (30 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), DNB - Orthopedics, Mch
Orthopedist, Delhi
Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2739 people found this helpful

Developmental Disabilities - Learn More About Them

Dr. R K Lohiya 88% (10 ratings)
Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT), Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Occupational Therapist, Gurgaon
Developmental Disabilities - Learn More About Them

Why Choose Occupational Therapy for Developmental Disabilities?

In this article we will be talking more about Occupational therapy and how it can effectively help those who are suffering from developmental disabilities. Do you know what occupational therapy is? Well, we have discussed it in detail in this article,  so have a look.

What is Occupational Therapy?

Occupational Therapy is the form of therapy in which a patient is treated so that they can participate in all the everyday activities in life and not let their disabilities hinder their ability from engaging in everyday activities. People from all age groups can be treated with occupational therapy. This kind of therapy helps not only to receive a rejuvenating effect but also improve the life standards of the people who are suffering from different health and mental problems.

Why patients with developmental disabilities should choose occupational therapy?

Patients with developmental disabilities should choose occupational therapy because by undergoing these therapy sessions they will be able to perform their daily tasks and engage in everyday activities. Their disabilities will not anymore be a hindrance for them. Nowadays doctors and therapists use these techniques because they provide a much more calming and gentle treatment to the overall problem which has the ability to solve a mental or health issue naturally.

How are the patients treated?

Occupational therapy helps children with developmental disabilities to participate not only in school but also in all other social activities. The therapy must be spread among everyone so that they can be aware of it and the necessary individuals receive the right treatment.

Adults are also treated so that they can again perform their daily tasks normally. People who suffer from developmental disorders or are recovering from injuries can regain their skills with the help of this therapy.

Before the treatment is started a thorough evaluation is done by the therapist in order to determine what are the goals that the person has to achieve and the treatment is designed accordingly. Custom designed interventions are done so that the person can develop the ability to perform daily tasks and activities on their own. An evaluation is done of the outcome of the therapy in order to determine if the set goals are being reached or not and if necessary what changes should be made to it.

Specialised assessments of the adult clients are done so that it can be determined that what are the specific skill sets that the client has to develop in order to be able to do a job. A lot of different tests are also done beforehand to make sure there are no complications.

Conclusion

People suffering from developmental disabilities should undergo occupational therapy so that they can improve their conditions and live a normal life like everybody else. People from all age groups suffering from developmental disabilities should undergo occupational therapy as it will not only help children to attend schools like regular kids but adults also will be able to live a normal life by doing jobs and engaging in all forms of social activities.
 

4482 people found this helpful

How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

Dr. Ravi C V 90% (15 ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4334 people found this helpful

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

Dr. Ravi C V 90% (15 ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3471 people found this helpful

Causes and symptoms of Delayed Speech

Dr. Abhishek Goel 90% (39 ratings)
Senior Residency, MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Causes and symptoms of Delayed Speech

It might happen that you may not find your child, at twelve months to two years of age, at the same level as their peers in verbal communication. You think it's just a developmental problem they are facing and put off seeking professional advice; an intrinsically wrong step to take, because your child might be suffering from Speech Delay.
Delayed speech, or alalia, can be roughly defined as a delay in the development and use of the biological mechanisms that produce speech.
The symptoms of speech delay are roughly categorized into age related groups, generally beginning at the age of 12 months and continuing through the early adolescence, and they are:
1. Age-12 months
a. It is indeed a symptom if your child cannot point at objects or cannot manage gestures, such as waving good-bye.
b. Another symptom is that if your child does not prefer to communicate verbally as much as his/her peers.
2. Age-15-18 months
a. If your child is unable to pronounce familiar syllables or simply cannot call you even by this time, it's a worrying symptom.
b. You find your child unable to, or simply not reciprocating to 'no', 'hello', 'hi', 'bye'.
c. If your child is unable to extend his/her vocabulary up to 15 words by fifteen months, then it's a symptom.

3. Age-2-4 years
a. You find your child unable to spontaneously produce speech and words.
b. Another worrying symptom is if your child is lacking consonant sounds at the beginning and end of words while speaking.
c. If you still find your child unable to form simple sentences and words, then it is indeed a troubling symptom, confirming the disorder.
The causes for the speech delay disorder are:
1. A primary cause can be physical disruption in parts of the mouth such lips or palate, which may be deformed.
2. Another serious cause can be an oral-motor dysfunction which is the disruption in the creation of the specific area of the brain which deals with speech and communication.
3. The disorder can also be attributed to impairment in the development of the child's intellectual, receptive and expressive abilities.
4. There can also be psychological causes involving school environment and peer relationships which might lead to disruption of speech patterns and reluctance in speech expression and development. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor and ask a free question.

2458 people found this helpful

Delayed Speech - Causes And Symptoms!

Dr. Rabi Kumar 87% (24 ratings)
MD - Paediatrics, DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Rourkela
Delayed Speech - Causes And Symptoms!

It might happen that you may not find your child, at twelve months to two years of age, at the same level as their peers in verbal communication. You think it's just a developmental problem they are facing and put off seeking professional advice; an intrinsically wrong step to take, because your child might be suffering from Speech Delay.

Delayed speech, or alalia, can be roughly defined as a delay in the development and use of the biological mechanisms that produce speech. Delayed speech is sometimes caused from hearing defect also. A deaf child is always dumb. Before we jump into conclusion of delayed speech, hearing assessment is mandatory.

The symptoms of speech delay are roughly categorized into age related groups, generally beginning at the age of 12 months and continuing through the early adolescence, and they are:

1. Age-12 months
a. It is indeed a symptom if your child cannot point at objects or cannot manage gestures, such as waving good-bye.
b. Another symptom is that if your child does not prefer to communicate verbally as much as his/her peers.

2. Age-15-18 months
a. If your child is unable to pronounce familiar syllables or simply cannot call you even by this time, it's a worrying symptom.
b. You find your child unable to, or simply not reciprocating to 'no', 'hello', 'hi', 'bye'.
c. If your child is unable to extend his/her vocabulary up to 15 words by fifteen months, then it's a symptom.

3. Age-2-4 years
a. You find your child unable to spontaneously produce speech and words.
b. Another worrying symptom is if your child is lacking consonant sounds at the beginning and end of words while speaking.
c. If you still find your child unable to form simple sentences and words, then it is indeed a troubling symptom, confirming the disorder.

The causes for the speech delay disorder are:
1. A primary cause can be physical disruption in parts of the mouth such lips or palate, which may be deformed.
2. Another serious cause can be an oral-motor dysfunction which is the disruption in the creation of the specific area of the brain which deals with speech and communication.
3. The disorder can also be attributed to impairment in the development of the child's intellectual, receptive and expressive abilities.
4. There can also be psychological causes involving school environment and peer relationships which might lead to disruption of speech patterns and reluctance in speech expression and development. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a pediatrician.

1749 people found this helpful

Delayed Speech Disorder: Causes You Need To Know

Rk Singh 88% (60 ratings)
DNB
Pediatrician, Varanasi
Delayed Speech Disorder: Causes You Need To Know

It might happen that you may not find your child, at twelve months to two years of age, at the same level as their peers in verbal communication. You think it's just a developmental problem they are facing and put off seeking professional advice; an intrinsically wrong step to take, because your child might be suffering from Speech Delay.

Delayed speech, or alalia, can be roughly defined as a delay in the development and use of the biological mechanisms that produce speech.

The symptoms of speech delay are roughly categorized into age related groups, generally beginning at the age of 12 months and continuing through the early adolescence, and they are:

  1. Age: 12 months
    • It is indeed a symptom if your child cannot point at objects or cannot manage gestures, such as waving good-bye.
    • Another symptom is that if your child does not prefer to communicate verbally as much as his/her peers.
  2. Age: 15-18 months
    • If your child is unable to pronounce familiar syllables or simply cannot call you even by this time, it's a worrying symptom.
    • You find your child unable to, or simply not reciprocating to 'no', 'hello', 'hi', 'bye'.
    • If your child is unable to extend his/her vocabulary up to 15 words by fifteen months, then it's a symptom.
  3. Age: 2-4 years
    • You find your child unable to spontaneously produce speech and words.
    • Another worrying symptom is if your child is lacking consonant sounds at the beginning and end of words while speaking.
    • If you still find your child unable to form simple sentences and words, then it is indeed a troubling symptom, confirming the disorder.

The causes for the speech delay disorder are:

  1. A primary cause can be physical disruption in parts of the mouth such lips or palate, which may be deformed.
  2. Another serious cause can be an oral-motor dysfunction which is the disruption in the creation of the specific area of the brain which deals with speech and communication.
  3. The disorder can also be attributed to impairment in the development of the child's intellectual, receptive and expressive abilities.
  4. There can also be psychological causes involving school environment and peer relationships which might lead to disruption of speech patterns and reluctance in speech expression and development.
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