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Developmental Delay Tips

Motor Developmental Delay!

Dr. Arpan Kumar 90% (13 ratings)
Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT), Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi

Reflexology and Developmental Disabilities

Dr. Meena Sharma 85% (30 ratings)
M.Phil - Psychology, Ph. D - Psychology
Psychologist, Delhi
Reflexology and Developmental Disabilities

Developmental disabilities include autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, mental retardation, learning difficulties and other developmenatl delays. Children with these disabilities indicate difficulties in the form of writing, reading, speaking, playing, understanding instructions, hitting, kicking, screaming, swearing, repetitive, rocking, and others. These challenging behaviors requires appropriate psychological assessment and management. With assessment requires numerous behavioral, intelligence and developmental tools. Following assessment appropriate techniques utilized to manage challenging behavior using psychological techniques. Recently new technique came into effect ie., Reflexology which work in other form and with limited sessions. It is one of the alternative therapy which is simple, safe and efective also. Therapist works with reflex area on the feets, hands and head. This techniques proves to be effective in reducing stress, emotional, agressive and behavioral problems of children effectively.

2 people found this helpful

Developmental milestones!

Dr. Arpan Kumar 90% (13 ratings)
Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT), Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi
Developmental milestones!

Developmental milestones!

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

Dr. Gaurav Khera 91% (30 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), DNB - Orthopedics, Mch
Orthopedist, Delhi
Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2739 people found this helpful

How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

Dr. Ravi C V 90% (15 ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4334 people found this helpful

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

Dr. Ravi C V 90% (15 ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3471 people found this helpful

Causes and symptoms of Delayed Speech

Dr. Abhishek Goel 90% (39 ratings)
Senior Residency, MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Causes and symptoms of Delayed Speech

It might happen that you may not find your child, at twelve months to two years of age, at the same level as their peers in verbal communication. You think it's just a developmental problem they are facing and put off seeking professional advice; an intrinsically wrong step to take, because your child might be suffering from Speech Delay.
Delayed speech, or alalia, can be roughly defined as a delay in the development and use of the biological mechanisms that produce speech.
The symptoms of speech delay are roughly categorized into age related groups, generally beginning at the age of 12 months and continuing through the early adolescence, and they are:
1. Age-12 months
a. It is indeed a symptom if your child cannot point at objects or cannot manage gestures, such as waving good-bye.
b. Another symptom is that if your child does not prefer to communicate verbally as much as his/her peers.
2. Age-15-18 months
a. If your child is unable to pronounce familiar syllables or simply cannot call you even by this time, it's a worrying symptom.
b. You find your child unable to, or simply not reciprocating to 'no', 'hello', 'hi', 'bye'.
c. If your child is unable to extend his/her vocabulary up to 15 words by fifteen months, then it's a symptom.

3. Age-2-4 years
a. You find your child unable to spontaneously produce speech and words.
b. Another worrying symptom is if your child is lacking consonant sounds at the beginning and end of words while speaking.
c. If you still find your child unable to form simple sentences and words, then it is indeed a troubling symptom, confirming the disorder.
The causes for the speech delay disorder are:
1. A primary cause can be physical disruption in parts of the mouth such lips or palate, which may be deformed.
2. Another serious cause can be an oral-motor dysfunction which is the disruption in the creation of the specific area of the brain which deals with speech and communication.
3. The disorder can also be attributed to impairment in the development of the child's intellectual, receptive and expressive abilities.
4. There can also be psychological causes involving school environment and peer relationships which might lead to disruption of speech patterns and reluctance in speech expression and development. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor and ask a free question.

2458 people found this helpful

Delayed Speech - Causes And Symptoms!

Dr. Rabi Kumar 89% (24 ratings)
MD - Paediatrics, DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Rourkela
Delayed Speech - Causes And Symptoms!

It might happen that you may not find your child, at twelve months to two years of age, at the same level as their peers in verbal communication. You think it's just a developmental problem they are facing and put off seeking professional advice; an intrinsically wrong step to take, because your child might be suffering from Speech Delay.

Delayed speech, or alalia, can be roughly defined as a delay in the development and use of the biological mechanisms that produce speech. Delayed speech is sometimes caused from hearing defect also. A deaf child is always dumb. Before we jump into conclusion of delayed speech, hearing assessment is mandatory.

The symptoms of speech delay are roughly categorized into age related groups, generally beginning at the age of 12 months and continuing through the early adolescence, and they are:

1. Age-12 months
a. It is indeed a symptom if your child cannot point at objects or cannot manage gestures, such as waving good-bye.
b. Another symptom is that if your child does not prefer to communicate verbally as much as his/her peers.

2. Age-15-18 months
a. If your child is unable to pronounce familiar syllables or simply cannot call you even by this time, it's a worrying symptom.
b. You find your child unable to, or simply not reciprocating to 'no', 'hello', 'hi', 'bye'.
c. If your child is unable to extend his/her vocabulary up to 15 words by fifteen months, then it's a symptom.

3. Age-2-4 years
a. You find your child unable to spontaneously produce speech and words.
b. Another worrying symptom is if your child is lacking consonant sounds at the beginning and end of words while speaking.
c. If you still find your child unable to form simple sentences and words, then it is indeed a troubling symptom, confirming the disorder.

The causes for the speech delay disorder are:
1. A primary cause can be physical disruption in parts of the mouth such lips or palate, which may be deformed.
2. Another serious cause can be an oral-motor dysfunction which is the disruption in the creation of the specific area of the brain which deals with speech and communication.
3. The disorder can also be attributed to impairment in the development of the child's intellectual, receptive and expressive abilities.
4. There can also be psychological causes involving school environment and peer relationships which might lead to disruption of speech patterns and reluctance in speech expression and development. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a pediatrician.

1749 people found this helpful

Delayed Speech And Language

Dr. Murli Singh 92% (221 ratings)
D.H.L.S, B.A.S.L.P, M.A, B.Ed .SE . ( H.I )
Speech Therapist, Delhi
Delayed Speech And Language

As with other skills and milestones, the age at which kids learn language and start talking can very. Many babies happily babble" mama" and" dada" well before their first birthday, and most toddlers can say about 20 words by the time they're 18 months old. But what if a 2-year-old isn't really talking yet or only puts two words together? 

Knowing what's" normal" and what's not in speech and language development can help parents figure out if there's cause for concern or if their child is right on schedule.

How are speech and language different?

Speech is the verbal expression of language and includes articulation (the way sounds and words are formed).

Language is the entire system of giving and getting information in a meaningful way. It's understanding and being understood through communication — verbal, nonverbal, and written.

What are speech or language delays?

Speech and language problems differ, but often overlap. For example:

A child with a language delay might pronounce words well but only be able to put two words together.

A child with a speech delay might use words and phrases to express ideas but be difficult to understand.

When do kids develop speech and language skills?

The stages of speech and language development are the same for all kids, but the age at which kids develop them can vary a lot.

During routine speech therapist/ doctors look to see if kids have reached developmental milestones at these ages:

Before 12 months

By the first birthday, babies should be using their voices to relate to their environment. Cooing and babbling are early stages of speech development. At around 9 months, babies begin to string sounds together, use different tones of speech, and say words like" mama" and" dada" (without really understanding what those words mean).

Before 12 months of age, babies also should be paying attention to sound and starting to recognize names of common objects (bottle, binky, etc.). Babies who watch intently but don't react to sound could be showing signs of hearing loss

By 12 to 15 months

Kids this age should have a wide range of speech sounds in their babbling (like p, b, m, d, or n), begin to imitate sounds and words they hear, and often say one or more words (not including" mama" and" dada"). Nouns usually come first, like" baby" and" ball" they also should be able to understand and follow simple one-step directions (" please give me the toy" etc.).

From 18 to 24 months

Most (but not all) toddlers can say about 20 words by 18 months and 50 or more words by the time they turn 2. By age 2, kids are starting to combine two words to make simple sentences, such as" baby crying" or" daddy big" a 2-year-old should be able to identify common objects (in person and in pictures); point to eyes, ears, or nose when asked; and follow two-step commands (" please pick up the toy and give it to me" for example).

From 2 to 3 years

Parents often see huge gains in their child's speech. A toddler's vocabulary should increase (to too many words to count) and he or she should routinely combine three or more words into sentences.

Comprehension also should increase — by age 3, a child should begin to understand what it means to" put it on the table" or" put it under the bed" kids also should begin to identify colors and understand descriptive concepts (big versus little, for example).

What are the signs of a speech or language delay?

A baby who doesn't respond to sound or who isn't vocalizing should be seen by a doctor right away. But often, it's hard for parents to know if their child is just taking a little longer to reach a speech or language milestone, or if there's a problem that needs medical attention.

Here are some things to watch for. Call your doctor if your child:

By 12 months: isn't using gestures, such as pointing or waving bye-bye

By 18 months: prefers gestures over vocalizations to communicate

By 18 months: has trouble imitating sounds

Has trouble understanding simple verbal requests

By 2 years: can only imitate speech or actions and doesn't produce words or phrases spontaneously

By 2 years: says only certain sounds or words repeatedly and can't use oral language to communicate more than his or her immediate needs

By 2 years: can't follow simple directions

By 2 years: has an unusual tone of voice (such as raspy or nasal sounding)

Is more difficult to understand than expected for his or her age:

Parents and regular caregivers should understand about half of a child's speech at 2 years and about three quarters at 3 years.

By 4 years old, a child should be mostly understood, even by people who don't know the child.

What causes speech or language delays?

A speech delay in an otherwise normally developing child might be due to an oral impairment, like problems with the tongue or palate (the roof of the mouth). And a short frenulum (the fold beneath the tongue) can limit tongue movement for speech production.

Many kids with speech delays have oral-motor problems. These happen when there's a problem in the areas of the brain responsible for speech, making it hard to coordinate the lips, tongue, and jaw to produce speech sounds. These kids also might have other oral-motor problems, such as feeding difficulties.

Hearing problems are also commonly related to delayed speech. That's why an audiologistshould test a child's hearing whenever there's a speech concern. Kids who have trouble hearing may have trouble articulating as well as understanding, imitating, and using language.
Ear infection especially, chronic infection, can affect hearing. Simple ear infections that have been treated, though, should not affect speech. And, as long as there is normal hearing in at least one ear, speech and language will develop normally.

How are speech or language delays diagnosed?

If you or your doctor think that your child might have a problem, it's important to get an early evaluation by a speech_ language therapistyou can find a speech-language pathologist on your own, or ask your health care provider to refer you to one.

The speech-language pathologist will evaluate your child's speech and language skills within the context of total development. The pathologist will do standardized tests and look for milestones in speech and language development.

The speech-language pathologist will also assess:

What your child understands (called receptive language)

What your child can say (called expressive language)

If your child is attempting to communicate in other ways, such as pointing, head shaking, gesturing, etc.

Sound development and clarity of speech

Your child's oral-motor status (how the mouth, tongue, palate, etc, work together for speech as well as eating and swallowing)

Based on the test results, the speech-language pathologist might recommend speech therapy for your child.

How does speech therapy help?

The speech therapist will work with your child to improve speech and language skills, and show you what to do at home to help your child.

What can parents do?

Parental involvement is an important part of helping kids who have a speech or language problem.

Here are a few ways to encourage speech development at home:

Spend a lot of time communicating with your child. Even during infancy — talk, sing, and encourage imitation of sounds and gestures.

Read to your child. Start reading when your child is a baby. Look for age-appropriate soft or board books or picture books that encourage kids to look while you name the pictures. Try starting with a classic book (such as pat the bunny, in which your child imitates the patting motion) or books with textures that kids can touch. Later, let your child point to recognizable pictures and try to name them. Then move on to nursery rhymes, which have rhythmic appeal. Progress to predictable books (such as brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?) that let kids anticipate what happens. Your little one may even start to memorize favorite stories.

Use everyday situations. To reinforce your child's speech and language, talk your way through the day. For example, name foods at the grocery store, explain what you're doing as you cook a meal or clean a room, point out objects around the house, and as you drive, point out sounds you hear. Ask questions and acknowledge your child's responses (even when they're hard to understand). Keep things simple, but avoid" baby talk"

Recognizing and treating speech and language delays early on is the best approach. With proper therapy and time, your child will be better able to communicate with you and the rest of the world.

Top Hospitals in Delhi

Dr. Sanjeev Kumar Singh 87% (192 ratings)
Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Lakhimpur Kheri
Top Hospitals in Delhi

Delhi is not only the national capital of India, but it also has the best healthcare facilities in the country. Delhi-NCR houses some of the best hospitals. They are known to provide world-class services and facilities in healthcare and so people from all parts of the country visit here. Here is a list of few top hospitals in Delhi:

1. Medanta Hospital - Multispeciality, Defence Colony, New Delhi

Medanta - The Medicity is one of India's largest hospital with over 9 institutions and 20 specialty divisions.  They have the most prestigious doctors across India on their panel. It is equipped with the latest technologies and provides various facilities like dialysis service, emergency service, chemo care etc.

Consultation fees: ₹1000

2. B L Kapoor Hospital- Karol Bagh, Delhi

BLK is the oldest private hospital which is running for more than sixty years old. It is Delhi’s premier multispecialty institute which offers a wide variety of services like general surgery, ophthalmology, ENT, dentistry, pulmonology, intensive care, orthopedics and mother & child care. It is a 650 bedded hospitals with the highest number of operation theaters- 17 and critical care unit with 125 beds. The use of latest and advanced technologies also make them stand out as compared to the other hospitals.

Consultation fees: ₹1500

3. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Hospital - Niti Bagh, New Delhi

RGCI & RC is amongst the best cancer hospital across Asia. It offers the cutting edge technology for the treatment of cancer and renowned super specialists like Dr. Sajjan Rajpurohit. The institute offers super specialized services in medical, surgical and radiation oncology. The hospital has won a number of awards as the best oncology hospital of India.

Consultation fees: ₹700

4. Max hospital, Saket Delhi

Max is one of India’s leading network of the hospital with more than 14 centers and 2300 doctors on board. They provide comprehensive, holistic and integrated healthcare services in 29 specialties. The hospitals are NABH and ISO accredited and offer best in class services by using the latest equipment and technologies.

Consultation fees: ₹1000

5. Bharti Eye Hospital, Delhi

Bharti Eye Hospital, Delhi, is more than 20 year old institute. It is headed by Dr. S. Bharti, who is one of the most famous and renowned doctors of this field. They have a wide range of treatments available to eye problems like cataract surgery, LASIK, cornea transplant, diabetic retinopathy and others.

Consultation fees: ₹800

6. Aarogya Hospital - IVF Specialist, Nirman Vihar,  Delhi

Aarogya hospital provides a spectrum of services at an affordable price using the latest available technology & equipment. They also have some of the best doctors on the panel. Medical facilities like ICU, NICU, Labour room & 3 OTs help in providing the best treatment to the patients. They have also introduced a specially advanced life support ambulance fully equipped with all modern resuscitation equipment with trained medical staff.

Consultation fees: ₹500

7. IBS Hospital - Neurosurgeon, Lajpat Nagar,  Delhi

Established in the year 2011, IBS Hospitals is known for its advanced medical care in the field of neurosciences. They also provide specialist service in other fields like joint replacement surgeries, bariatric, eye and dental surgeries. They have a special rehabilitation department for speedy and healthy recovery post surgery.

Consultation fees: ₹ 1000

8. SCI International Hospital - General Surgeon, Greater Kailash,  Delhi

SCI (Surgical Centre of India) is a 80 bedded multispeciality Hospital, with OPD services in various fields like urology, IVF, obstetrics & gynae, general surgery, paediatrics, orthopaedics etc. All the modern day diagnostic machines are available for better diagnose and treatment. Three well-equipped modular operation theatres reduce the chances of infection and allows the surgeons to perform the surgery easily.

Consultation fees: ₹ 500

9. Jeewan Mala Hospital - Gynaecologist, Karol Bagh, Delhi

It is one of the oldest private hospital running in India, and is known for its legacy and the best in class medical services provided here. The hospital is known for its dedicated, affordable, compassionate and comprehensive healthcare. They have the latest technologies in all the fields. Dr. Malvika Sabharwal who heads the gynecology department is a recipient of padmashree award.

Consultation fees: ₹500

10. Apollo Spectra Hospitals- Kailash Colony, Delhi

Apollo Spectra is a multispeciality hospital with more than 12 centres across 9 cities. It has world-class infrastructure and more than 700 leading doctors from various fields that gives you all the benefits of a large hospital but in a more economical and friendly manner.

Consultation fees: ₹ 1000

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