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Battered Man Syndrome Tips

Klinefelter Syndrome

Dr. Sharath Kumar C 87% (1355 ratings)
Ph.D (Male Infertility), M.S (Infertility), D.G.L.S, D.R.C.O.G, C.Sc., D.M.R.D, M.B.B.S
Sexologist, Bangalore
Klinefelter Syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome, also known as the xxy condition, is a term used to describe males who have an extra x chromosome in most of their cells.

Klinefelter syndrome is named after Dr. Henry klinefelter, who first described a group of symptoms found in some men with the extra x chromosome. About one of every 500 males has an extra x chromosome, but many don't have any symptoms.

Symptoms:

  • Symptoms depend on how many xxy cells a man has, how much testosterone is in his body, and his age when the condition is diagnosed.
  • As xxy males enter puberty, they may have a taller, less muscular body, less facial and body hair, and broader hips than other boys. As teens, xxy males may have larger breasts, weaker bones, and a lower energy level than other boys.
  • Xxy adult males look similar to males without the condition, although they are often taller and may have autoimmune disorders, breast cancer, vein diseases, osteoporosis, and tooth decay.

Fertility:
Xxy males can have normal or subnormal sex lives, but they usually make little or no sperm and are infertile. Some times, they are impotent also.

Treatment:

  • The xxy chromosome pattern cannot be changed. Treatments involve physical, speech, occupational, behavioral, mental health, and family therapists, and testosterone replacement therapy.
  •  Even though all men with klinefelter syndrome have the extra x chromosome, not every xxy male has all of those symptoms. 
  • Because not every male with an xxy pattern has all the symptoms of klinefelter syndrome, it is common to use the term xxy male to describe these men, or xxy condition to describe the symptoms. 
     
2 people found this helpful

What Happens In Men With Klinefelter Syndrome?

Dr. Vinod Raina 89% (5866 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
What Happens In Men With Klinefelter Syndrome?

Sex Problems: What Happens in Men With Klinefelter Syndrome

Some people suffer from sex problems; that's an unfortunate fact of life. One reason guys may pay extra attention to their penis health is to avoid the development of issues that might impact their success with a potential partner. But sometimes there can be problems that are a bit beyond their control. For example, if a man is born with the condition known as Klinefelter syndrome, he is likely to experience some degree of difficulty, although the extent can vary.

Learning about Klinefelter syndrome

Harry Fitch Klinefelter was an endocrinologist who in the 1940s discovered the condition that is named after him. To understand Klinefelter syndrome, it's necessary to know that women are born with two "X" chromosomes (XX) and men are born with one "X" and one "Y" (XY). (A chromosome is a DNA molecule carrying genetic material.)But in some rare instances, a man may be born with both two "X" chromosome and oneY" chromosome (XXY) - or even more rarely with more than 2 "X" chromosomes. When either of these situations occur, the man is said to have Klinefelter syndrome.Some people assume that because the man has XXY chromosomes, that he is a hermaphrodite - someone with both a penis and a vagina. This is not the case.

Signs and symptoms

As mentioned, there can be some variation in how Klinefelter presents, but in general, these are typical signs and symptoms associated with the condition:

- They are often taller than other males.

- Often they will have either a skinny, lanky body type or a more rounded body type. In the latter case, gynecomastia (increased breast tissue) is often present.

- Muscle control and coordination are often affected.

- Their bones may be weaker than other males of their age, and they may sport less body hair.

- Often, they are either infertile or have reduced fertility.

- Typically, their testicles are significantly smaller than those of other men.

The fertility issue and the smaller size of the testicles is primarily related to the fact that men with Klinefelter syndrome typically produce much less testosterone. This is what can cause the sex problems alluded to earlier.

Sex problems

Clearly, fertility concerns count as a sex problem, especially if a man wishes to have children or is in a relationship with a partner who wishes to bear children. In addition, many men with small testicles feel self-conscious about this fact and this can create self-esteem issues that can also impede sexual performance in some men.But lower testosterone also generally means that one's libido is not as active as it would otherwise be. Not only can this lead to less of a desire for sex; it can also in some cases create erectile dysfunction issues.

Treatment

There's not a "cure" for Klinefelter, but some treatments are available. Typically, testosterone therapy can be useful, especially when begun during adolescence. There also have been numerous success cases of pregnancy by in vitro fertilization, using sperm taken from men with Klinefelter. Men in whom the extra breast tissue is extreme may want to consider surgical procedures if it causes them distress.Working closely with an experienced doctor can make a big difference for many men with this condition.

Whether one has Klinefelter syndrome and sex problems or is considered typical, it still pays to spend time maintaining one's precious penis health. One way to do this is to daily apply a top notch penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). For best results, select a crème that includes a wide range of vitamins, such as A, B5, C, D and E, all of which can benefit the penis. It also helps to find a crème with L-arginine, an amino acid which helps boost nitric oxide production and thereby keep penile blood vessels healthier.

5 people found this helpful

Penis Pain From Reiter's Syndrome

Dr. Vinod Raina 89% (5866 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Penis Pain From Reiter's Syndrome

Penis Pain From Reiter's Syndrome

Proper penis care can be tricky sometimes, especially when the penis can be affected by seemingly unrelated problems. For example, if a man has penis pain, it's not unreasonable to expect the cause to be something obvious, like a kick to the penis or a sexually-transmitted infection. But sometimes discovering the penis pain cause can be circuitous. A case in point is when that penis pain is linked to a condition known as Reiter's syndrome.

Explaining Reiter's syndrome

Named after a German physician who described it during World War I, Reiter's syndrome is also known by numerous other names, including reactive arthritis, arthritis urethritica and polyarteritis enterica. It's a form of arthritis which manifests in seemingly unconnected areas of the body.

When a person has Reiter's syndrome, they experience the following:

- Arthritis (a stiffness or pain in the joints, especially knees, ankles, feet and wrists);

- Conjunctivitis (itchy, red inflammation of the eyes); and

- Inflammation of the urinary and/or gastrointestinal system. (In men, this typically presents as penis pain.)

Reiter's syndrome is generally thought to occur as a reaction to an infection somewhere in the body. For example, in one medically famous case, a salmonella outbreak among police officers caused Reiter's syndrome to show up in some of them several months later. Several bacteria are strongly associated with Reiter's, and salmonella is one of them. So, for that matter, are the bacteria associated with chlamydia, a sexually-transmitted infection.

While bacteria are a major factor, there also seems to be a genetic factor. The current working theory is that some people are more genetically disposed to develop Reiter's syndrome than others. When these people are exposed to the right kind of bacteria, it can trigger the development of Reiter's.

The condition itself is therefore not contagious; however, the bacteria that trigger it can be passed from one person to another.

Penis symptoms

Penis pain is not the only discomfort that can be associated with Reiter's. It often causes men to need to urinate much more frequently and with greater urgency. And when urinating, there is often a burning sensation, as well as some form of discharge. In some cases, a man may develop some painful feelings in the prostate as well. If the prostate pains develop into prostatitis, they will usually be accompanied by fever and chills.

In some cases, a man may also develop lesions or sores on the penis, typically on the tip. Although usually painless, they can be off-putting visually. Occasionally, other rashes may develop.

Treatment

Proper diagnosis is important to begin treatment. Reiter's syndrome cannot be cured, so the emphasis is on managing the symptoms. There are several lifestyle corrections, including getting plenty of rest and initiating exercises aimed at strengthening joints, which may be employed. Among the medications typically utilized in treating the disease are corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and immunosuppressive drugs. Treatment is effective in most people, although some may have recurrences.

Reiter's syndrome is one of the less common sources of penis pain. In general, of course, the better health of the penis, the more resilient it is to common forms of penis pain - so regular application of a top notch penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) is strongly advised. The best crèmes are those which contain L-carnitine. Often, a penis will lose sensation over time, especially if it is handled too roughly (even if such handling is pleasurable at the time). The amino acid L-carnitine has neuroprotective properties which can help to prevent diminishment of penis sensitivity in the often-handled penis. The finest crème should also include alpha lipoic acid. This is a potent antioxidant and as such is well-positioned to fight excess free radicals and thereby prevent damage from oxidative stress.

2 people found this helpful

Dhat Syndrome - An Overview

Dr. Vijay Abbot 92% (731 ratings)
Graduate in Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery ( GAMS )
Sexologist, Delhi
Dhat Syndrome - An Overview

Cultures all across the world have their typical ways of dealing with sexuality and while all cultures bring something good, they also have their bad quirks as well. While India gave the world Kama Sutra, it also perpetuates sexual conditions such as the Dhat syndrome due to certain long held beliefs. These cause many problems among men and women and in the context of modern medicine, should be treated as a psychological problem.

What is Dhat Syndrome?
Dhat syndrome is the fear that a man is losing his semen without any control over it. Men afflicted by Dhat syndrome often complain that they are losing semen involuntarily, and thus feeling fatigued all the time. Some of the other complaints and symptoms associated with Dhat syndrome can be categorized as follows:

  1. Suffering from premature ejaculation
  2. Impotence or erectile dysfunction bought on by a psychological fear of losing semen
  3. Fear that the person is losing semen through urine
  4. Person feels guilty or embarrassed about masturbation or sex
  5. Has anxiety disorders which can affect daily functioning

The causes for Dhat Syndrome:

This is a psychological issue caused primarily by social taboos and deeply ingrained beliefs which stem from religious doctrine or social stigma. For example, semen is considered to be a vital fluid and an integral part of life force. The belief is formed from an old Hindu spiritual belief that semen is very hard for the body to produce. This is ingrained into some boys who then feel guilty at accidental discharges such as nightfall or ejaculation through masturbation.

Diagnosis by Doctors:
Most doctors classify this as a psychological disorder as there are many other forms with slight variations of this present in many other cultures. Some examples of these are:

  1. Jiryan primarily in South East Asia
  2. Shen-k'uei in China
  3. Prameha in Srilanka

This is also commonly known as semen loss anxiety and is seen in certain western cultures too. The notion that holding onto semen is valuable for a man's vitality is not only a wrong notion but it stops the men from having a normal sex life. Even masturbation can make them feel guilty.

Treatment:
The only treatment options that are effective against this condition are cognitive behavioral therapies which use psychological intervention along with social exercises. This and being informed about your body from proper medical sources will help you release the inhibitions and lead a normal sex life.
 

4928 people found this helpful

Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

Dr. Ashok Rughani 92% (2327 ratings)
PhD SEXUAL MEDICINE, DGO, MBBS
Sexologist, Ahmedabad
Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome

Testosterone is a hormone, which grows the most effective at the time of your puberty. This is the main substance, which helps you to grow your chest hair, then helps to deepen your voice, boosts the growth of your penis and helps to build up your muscle.

After a certain point of age, most of the men start experiencing a decline in testosterone. If you are not being sexually aroused then the lack of testosterone can be one reason. A large number of men erroneously believe that their lack of sex drive is accompanied by their old age.

Some possible causes for testosterone deficiency may include:

  • Infection, injury or problems in the testicles.

  • Chemotherapy or radiation to cure cancer.

  • Genetic abnormalities.

  • Dysfunction in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  • Inflammatory disease in the lungs or heart.

  • Certain effects of medication.

  • Alcoholism.

  • Abnormal obesity.

The testosterone deficiency can lead a man to a plethora of different sexual problems. The production of hormone is connected to your brain and inadequate testosterone can cause many problems, which may include:

  1. Loss of sex drive.

  2. Feeling ill and low on confidence.

  3. Difficulty concentrating.

  4. Muscle mass decrease.

  5. Decreased haemoglobin and anaemia.

  6. Fragile bones.

  7. Loss of body hair.

The proper way to detect testosterone deficiency problem is to measure the level of testosterone in your blood.

Some treatments of testosterone deficiency may include:

  1. Injecting intramuscular medicine can help you achieve higher levels of testosterone. This can be given anywhere on your muscle with a gap of two to 10 weeks.

  2. Application of testosterone gel especially inside your nose can lower the problem.

  3. Application of muco-adhesive material on your gum two times a day.

  4. Applying subcutaneous pellet.

  5. Application of testosterone stick, you should apply it on your underarms like a deodorant.

The treatments for testosterone deficiency come with many disadvantages too. As such, consult a doctor before indulging yourself into any kind of treatment.

3502 people found this helpful

Dhat Syndrome - Passage of Semen

Dr. Ramesh Maheshwari 88% (6368 ratings)
MD-Dermatology, MBBS
Sexologist, Pune
Dhat Syndrome - Passage of Semen
Explanation to the patient -

This is not actually semen but a secretion from the prostatic and urethral glands. When a man squats in the Indian style toilet and strains a little, the pressure is transmitted from the rectum to the prostate and urethra, and this in turn results in a few drops of a sticky substance to come out of the urethra.
278 people found this helpful

What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

Dr. Amarjit Singh Jassi 88% (216 ratings)
INSTITUTE OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINES
Ayurveda, Delhi
What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

What is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's:

  • Menstrual cycle
  • Ability to have children
  • Hormones
  • Heart
  • Blood vessels
  • Appearance

With PCOS, women typically have:

  • High levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, though females also make them.
  • Missed or irregular periods (monthly bleeding)
  • Many small cysts (sists) (fluid-filled sacs) in their ovaries

How many women have PCOS?

Between 1 in 10 and 1 in 20 women of childbearing age has PCOS. As many as 5 million women in the United States may be affected. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old.

What causes PCOS?

The cause of PCOS is unknown. But most experts think that several factors, including genetics, could play a role. Women with PCOS are more likely to have a mother or sister with PCOS.

A main underlying problem with PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries make more androgens than normal. Androgens are male hormones that females also make. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation.

Researchers also think insulin may be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. Many women with PCOS have too much insulin in their bodies because they have problems using it. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. High androgen levels can lead to:

  • Acne
  • Excessive hair growth
  • Weight gain
  • Problems with ovulation

What are the symptoms of PCOS?

The symptoms of PCOS can vary from woman to woman. Some of the symptoms of PCOS include:

  • Infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating. In fact, PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility.
  • Infrequent, absent, and/or irregular menstrual periods
  • Hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um) — increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes
  • Cysts on the ovaries
  • Acne, oily skin, or dandruff
  • Weight gain or obesity, usually with extra weight around the waist
  • Male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
  • Patches of skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs that are thick and dark brown or black
  • Skin tags — excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
  • Pelvic pain
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Sleep apnea — when breathing stops for short periods of time while asleep

Why do women with PCOS have trouble with their menstrual cycle and fertility?

The ovaries, where a woman's eggs are produced, have tiny fluid-filled sacs called follicles or cysts. As the egg grows, the follicle builds up fluid. When the egg matures, the follicle breaks open, the egg is released, and the egg travels through the fallopian tube to the uterus (womb) for fertilization. This is called ovulation.

In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for an egg to fully mature. The follicles may start to grow and build up fluid but ovulation does not occur. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. For these reasons, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the ovaries make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation.
 

Does PCOS change at menopause?

Yes and no. PCOS affects many systems in the body. So, many symptoms may persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male-pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications (health problems) from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke, and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.

How do I know if I have PCOS?

There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take the following steps to find out if you have PCOS or if something else is causing your symptoms.

Medical history. Your doctor will ask about your menstrual periods, weight changes, and other symptoms.

Physical exam. Your doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check the areas of increased hair growth. You should try to allow the natural hair to grow for a few days before the visit.

Pelvic exam. Your doctor might want to check to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts.

Blood tests. Your doctor may check the androgen hormone and glucose (sugar) levels in your blood.

Vaginal ultrasound (sonogram). Your doctor may perform a test that uses sound waves to take pictures of the pelvic area. It might be used to examine your ovaries for cysts and check the endometrium (en-do-MEE-tree-uhm) (lining of the womb). This lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular.

How is PCOS treated?

Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals. Some treatments for PCOS include:

Lifestyle modification. Many women with PCOS are overweight or obese, which can cause health problems. You can help manage your PCOS by eating healthy and exercising to keep your weight at a healthy level. Healthy eating tips include:

  • Limiting processed foods and foods with added sugars
  • Adding more whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats to your diet

This helps to lower blood glucose (sugar) levels, improve the body's use of insulin, and normalize hormone levels in your body. Even a 10 percent loss in body weight can restore a normal period and make your cycle more regular.

Birth control pills. For women who don't want to get pregnant, birth control pills can:

  • Control menstrual cycles
  • Reduce male hormone levels
  • Help to clear acne

Keep in mind that the menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone (proh-JES-tuh-rohn), like Provera, to control the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of endometrial cancer (See Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?). But, progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth.

Diabetes medications. The medicine metformin (Glucophage) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It has also been found to help with PCOS symptoms, though it isn't approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this use. Metformin affects the way insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) and lowers testosterone production. It slows the growth of abnormal hair and, after a few months of use, may help ovulation to return. Recent research has shown metformin to have other positive effects, such as decreased body mass and improved cholesterol levels. Metformin will not cause a person to become diabetic.

Fertility medications. Lack of ovulation is usually the reason for fertility problems in women with PCOS. Several medications that stimulate ovulation can help women with PCOS become pregnant. Even so, other reasons for infertility in both the woman and man should be ruled out before fertility medications are used. Also, some fertility medications increase the risk for multiple births (twins, triplets). Treatment options include:

  • Clomiphene (KLOHM-uh-feen) (Clomid, Serophene) — the first choice therapy to stimulate ovulation for most patients.
  • Metformin taken with clomiphene — may be tried if clomiphene alone fails. The combination may help women with PCOS ovulate on lower doses of medication.
  • Gonadotropins (goe-NAD-oh-troe-pins) — given as shots, but are more expensive and raise the risk of multiple births compared to clomiphene.

Another option is in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF offers the best chance of becoming pregnant in any given cycle. It also gives doctors better control over the chance of multiple births. But, IVF is very costly.

Surgery. "Ovarian drilling" is a surgery that may increase the chance of ovulation. It's sometimes used when a woman does not respond to fertility medicines. The doctor makes a very small cut above or below the navel (belly button) and inserts a small tool that acts like a telescope into the abdomen (stomach). This is called laparoscopy (lap-uh-RAHS-kuh-pee). The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But, these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with loss of scalp hair or increased hair growth on other parts of the body.

Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. Medicines called anti-androgens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (speer-on-oh-LAK-tone) (Aldactone), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce the impact of male hormones on hair growth in women. Finasteride (fin-AST-uhr-yd) (Propecia), a medicine taken by men for hair loss, has the same effect. Anti-androgens are often combined with birth control pills.  These medications should not be taken if you are trying to become pregnant.

Before taking Aldactone, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed while taking this medicine. Women who may become pregnant should not handle Propecia.

Other options include:

  • Vaniqa (van-ik-uh) cream to reduce facial hair
  • Laser hair removal or electrolysis to remove hair
  • Hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing

Other treatments. Some research has shown that bariatric (weight loss) surgery may be effective in resolving PCOS in morbidly obese women. Morbid obesity means having a BMI of more than 40, or a BMI of 35 to 40 with an obesity-related disease. The drug troglitazone (troh-GLIT-uh-zohn) was shown to help women with PCOS. But, it was taken off the market because it caused liver problems. Similar drugs without the same side effect are being tested in small trials.

Researchers continue to search for new ways to treat PCOS. To learn more about current PCOS treatment studies, visit ClinicalTrials.gov. Talk to your doctor about whether taking part in a clinical trial might be right for you.

How does PCOS affect a woman while pregnant?

Women with PCOS appear to have higher rates of:

Babies born to women with PCOS have a higher risk of spending time in a neonatal intensive care unit or of dying before, during, or shortly after birth. Most of the time, these problems occur in multiple-birth babies (twins, triplets).

Researchers are studying whether the diabetes medicine metformin can prevent or reduce the chances of having problems while pregnant. Metformin also lowers male hormone levels and limits weight gain in women who are obese when they get pregnant.

Metformin is an FDA pregnancy category B drug. It does not appear to cause major birth defects or other problems in pregnant women. But, there have only been a few studies of metformin use in pregnant women to confirm its safety. Talk to your doctor about taking metformin if you are pregnant or are trying to become pregnant. Also, metformin is passed through breastmilk. Talk with your doctor about metformin use if you are a nursing mother.

Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?

Women with PCOS have greater chances of developing several serious health conditions, including life-threatening diseases. Recent studies found that:

  • More than 50 percent of women with PCOS will have diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) before the age of 40.
  • The risk of heart attack is 4 to 7 times higher in women with PCOS than women of the same age without PCOS.
  • Women with PCOS are at greater risk of having high blood pressure.
  • Women with PCOS have high levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol.
  • Women with PCOS can develop sleep apnea. This is when breathing stops for short periods of time during sleep.

Women with PCOS may also develop anxiety and depression. It is important to talk to your doctor about treatment for these mental health conditions.

Women with PCOS are also at risk for endometrial cancer. Irregular menstrual periods and the lack of ovulation cause women to produce the hormone estrogen, but not the hormone progesterone. Progesterone causes the endometrium (lining of the womb) to shed each month as a menstrual period. Without progesterone, the endometrium becomes thick, which can cause heavy or irregular bleeding. Over time, this can lead to endometrial hyperplasia, when the lining grows too much, and cancer.

I have PCOS. What can I do to prevent complications?

If you have PCOS, get your symptoms under control at an earlier age to help reduce your chances of having complications like diabetes and heart disease. Talk to your doctor about treating all your symptoms, rather than focusing on just one aspect of your PCOS, such as problems getting pregnant. Also, talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes regularly. Other steps you can take to lower your chances of health problems include:

  • Eating right
  • Exercising
  • Not smoking

How can I cope with the emotional effects of PCOS?

Having PCOS can be difficult. You may feel:

  • Embarrassed by your appearance
  • Worried about being able to get pregnant
  • Depressed

Getting treatment for PCOS can help with these concerns and help boost your self-esteem. You may also want to look for support groups in your area or online to help you deal with the emotional effects of PCOS. You are not alone and there are resources available for women with PCOS.

 

 

 

10 people found this helpful

Tingling and Sore Penis - Look Into Restless Genital Syndrome!

Dr. Vinod Raina 89% (5866 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Tingling and Sore Penis - Look Into Restless Genital Syndrome!

Tingling and Sore Penis? Look Into Restless Genital Syndrome

Most of the time, an aroused penis is a welcome situation for a man. Sure, sometimes that erection comes at a somewhat embarrassing moment, like when making a presentation, but most of the time guys are happy to see their little friend perking up. It's usually a sign of good penis health, if nothing else. But for a small minority of men, that erection is a pain. It's a result of something known as restless genital syndrome, and it can make for a sore penis situation for some men.

Not a regular erection

Often just called RGS and sometimes known as PGAD (persistent genital arousal disorder), restless genital syndrome is something which maybe doesn't sound so bad at first. Basically, when a guy has this condition, his penis feels intensely aroused, even without sexual stimulus or fantasies.

How is that different than just popping an occasional boner for no reason at all, as happens commonly? Well, RGS occurs much more frequently - and the arousal can last for hours at a time, unless a man relieves himself by masturbating or having partner sex. And in some cases, even that doesn't diminish the state of excitement that his penis feels. And when a guy is aroused for too long, it often leads to a sore penis.

Not priapism

This is different from priapism, in which a physical situation results in the penis being painfully erect for an extended period of time. With RGS, the erection may wax and wane several times - but even when it goes soft, the tingling and soreness remains.

In some cases, the sensation can be so extreme that a guy simply can't concentrate on anything else. He may be working on an important project with a fast-approaching deadline, but his tingling, sore penis keeps him from making progress. And when guys afflicted with RGS take matters into their own hands and masturbate for relief, they often feel that they're being controlled by their penis. In some instances, not masturbating can be even more problematic; if a guy gets RGS while walking, for example, in some cases the feeling of his penis rubbing against trouser fabric can cause him to unwillingly ejaculate in his pants.

Why?

So, what happens to cause RGS? Because it is a rare condition and has only recently started being explored, doctors don't really know. It appears that it's a neurological problem in which the nerves in the penis become hyper-sensitive - but exactly why they take on this high degree of sensitivity is not clear.

Some doctors think this is similar to restless leg syndrome, and so they prescribe medications used to treat that condition, such as selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or dopamine agonists. Since the condition is considered so rare, clinical trials have not been conducted yet to determine the effectiveness of these treatments, but some men report that they help.

If a man thinks he has RGS, he should definitely consult with a doctor, especially a urologist or neurologist with experience working with unusual conditions.

Simply living with RGS can make for a sore penis, as can frequently masturbating to provide some much-needed relief. One way to help soothe that sore penis is to regularly apply a top drawer penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Proper moisturization is one way to help ease a sore penis, so select a crème with both a high end emollient (such as shea butter) and a favored hydrator (such as vitamin E) Be sure the crème also contains pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5. Pantothenic acid is a vital nutrient that helps maintain and strengthen healthy penile tissue.

Sore Male Organ Syndrome - Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

Dr. Vinod Raina 89% (5866 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Sore Male Organ Syndrome - Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

Sore Male Organ Syndrome: Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

A man can get a sore male organ(MO) from any number of reasons, including using his equipment too much or not keeping his manhood well lubricated during extended sensual encounters. There can also be some male organ health concerns, such as a social disease, that might cause a sore MO as well. But sometimes that soreness comes from a medical issue that goes beyond the MO - and such can be the case when a guy has Behcet's disease.

What it is?

Also called Behcet's syndrome, Behcet's disease is named after a Turkish doctor who is credited with discovering it in the 1930s. It is both an autoimmune and an autoinflammatory disease.

Autoimmune means that the body, for some reason usually unknown, starts to sense a normal body part or function as abnormal and therefore initiates a defense against it; in other words, the body starts fighting itself. Autoinflammatory diseases come about when a genetic mutation is the reason that the immune system starts fighting against a normal body part of function.

With Behcet's, this brings about serious inflammation in blood vessels. When this happens, it may manifest in several different ways: as skin rashes, as sores in the mouth, as red eyes, as arthritis pain in joints - or as MO sores. And those MO sores can make for a sore MO.

There are an estimated 16,000-20,000 people with Behcet's disease in the United States, and it is more likely to occur in men than in women.

Sometimes it can be severe and cause pain and inconvenience; in other people, it may be very mild and hardly noticed. While the sore MO can be a problem, there are other potential complications, including vision loss or stroke, that are of greater concern.

Many men find that when a Behcet's disease flare-up occurs and results in MO sores that their sensual lives are affected. The sores can give the impression that the member may have a social disease when, in fact, Behcet's is not contagious. But even if a partner is willing, many men find that the sore MO impacts the pleasure that they would otherwise feel from engaging in sensual activity.

Treatment

Scientists still do not understand the cause of Behcet's, despite knowing there is a genetic component associated with it. Diagnosing it can sometimes take a while, especially if one has only minor symptoms.

In terms of the sore male organ, treatment typically involves topical corticosteroid medications. This help reduces the swelling and the pain. If a flare-up is mild, the sores may resolve on their own without intervention.

However, especially with more severe cases, it often is necessary to maintain continuing treatment in order to reduce the number or severity of flare-ups. This usually involves continued use of corticosteroids, but with other medications added to help suppress the overact immune response.

During flare-ups, it's also important that a person gets sufficient rest. This can help the body "re-group" and aid it in resolving the flare-up more quickly.

Even when sores from Behcet's disease go away, a guy may still experience a sore male organ. Once sores are gone, it may be helpful to regularly apply a first rate male organ health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Soreness is often a sign of damaged male organ skin, so try finding a crème that contains helpful moisturizing agents, such as a high end emollient (look for shea butter) and a natural hydrator (such as vitamin E). Try to locate a crème which also lists vitamin D among its ingredients. Vitamin D has proven benefits in fighting diseases and supporting healthy cellular function and can provide important health benefits.

 

Sore Male Organ Syndrome - Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

Dr. Vinod Raina 89% (5866 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Sore Male Organ Syndrome - Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

Sore Male Organ Syndrome: Could It Be Behcet's Disease?

A man can get a sore male organ(MO) from any number of reasons, including using his equipment too much or not keeping his manhood well lubricated during extended sensual encounters. There can also be some male organ health concerns, such as a social disease, that might cause a sore MO as well. But sometimes that soreness comes from a medical issue that goes beyond the MO - and such can be the case when a guy has Behcet's disease.

What it is

Also called Behcet's syndrome, Behcet's disease is named after a Turkish doctor who is credited with discovering it in the 1930s. It is both an autoimmune and an autoinflammatory disease.Autoimmune means that the body, for some reason usually unknown, starts to sense a normal body part or function as abnormal and therefore initiates a defense against it; in other words, the body starts fighting itself. Autoinflammatory diseases come about when a genetic mutation is the reason that the immune system starts fighting against a normal body part of function.With Behcet's, this brings about serious inflammation in blood vessels. When this happens, it may manifest in several different ways: as skin rashes, as sores in the mouth, as red eyes, as arthritis pain in joints - or as MO sores. And those MO sores can make for a sore MO.There are an estimated 16,000-20,000 people with Behcet's disease in the United States, and it is more likely to occur in men than in women.

Sometimes it can be severe and cause pain and inconvenience; in other people, it may be very mild and hardly noticed. While the sore MO can be a problem, there are other potential complications, including vision loss or stroke, that are of greater concern.Many men find that when a Behcet's disease flare-up occurs and results in MO sores that their sensual lives are affected. The sores can give the impression that the member may have a social disease when, in fact, Behcet's is not contagious. But even if a partner is willing, many men find that the sore MO impacts the pleasure that they would otherwise feel from engaging in sensual activity.

Treatment

Scientists still do not understand the cause of Behcet's, despite knowing there is a genetic component associated with it. Diagnosing it can sometimes take a while, especially if one has only minor symptoms.In terms of the sore male organ, treatment typically involves topical corticosteroid medications. This help reduces the swelling and the pain. If a flare-up is mild, the sores may resolve on their own without intervention.However, especially with more severe cases, it often is necessary to maintain continuing treatment in order to reduce the number or severity of flare-ups. This usually involves continued use of corticosteroids, but with other medications added to help suppress the overact immune response.

During flare-ups, it's also important that a person gets sufficient rest. This can help the body "re-group" and aid it in resolving the flare-up more quickly.Even when sores from Behcet's disease go away, a guy may still experience a sore male organ. Once sores are gone, it may be helpful to regularly apply a first rate male organ health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Soreness is often a sign of damaged male organ skin, so try finding a crème that contains helpful moisturizing agents, such as a high end emollient (look for shea butter) and a natural hydrator (such as vitamin E). Try to locate a crème which also lists vitamin D among its ingredients. Vitamin D has proven benefits in fighting diseases and supporting healthy cellular function and can provide important health benefits.

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