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Tooth Extraction Health Feed

Can we have dental treatment in case of pregnancy ? Treatment like extraction of tooth root, filling, etc.

Dr. Indrakamal Majumdar 90% (68 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Kolkata
Can we have dental treatment in case of pregnancy ? Treatment like extraction of tooth root, filling, etc.
Root canal treatment can be done. Certain antibiotics cannot bbe prescribed in the 1st and 3rd trimesters but we can attempt extraction in the 2nd trimester.
1 person found this helpful
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I am taking medicines for tooth extraction. But I no longer want to extract my tooth. What disease am I risking from the medicines if I don't extract my tooth?

BDS, MDS - Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Advanced course in maxillofacial sugery
Dentist, Lucknow
I am taking medicines for tooth extraction. But I no longer want to extract my tooth. What disease am I risking from ...
You went through the ordeal of antibiotics for nothing as pain returns you will again need them these r double edged weapons.
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I had my molar removed so I placed a cotton ball in my mouth which I swallowed accidentally, is it dangerous? What immediate actions are required?

Dr. Sandeep Kumar Lochab 88% (22 ratings)
BDS, MDS - Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopaedics
Dentist, Moradabad
I had my molar removed so I placed a cotton ball in my mouth which I swallowed accidentally, is it dangerous? What im...
Dear lybrate-user, please relax. First of all the cotton pack used must have been a sterilized one so there are very less chances of some kind of infection. Secondly please pay attention while passing stools. It may come out that way. If not then you need to see a gastero-enterologist. Chances of the later option are rare. Cheers.
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When is tooth extraction necessary? If the tooth is extracted is it necessary to fill the gap?

Dr. Amaninder Randhawa 89% (76 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Fatehgarh Churian
When is tooth extraction necessary? If the tooth is extracted is it necessary to fill the gap?
Well it depends on the case. If posterior are going to be extracted then its very important to fill the gap ,coz supra erruption of the disbalanced tooth will occur.
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Dentist has told to extract my sister wisdom tooth on Friday surgical procedure sunday there is function after extraction will swelling be there. Should my sister extract wisdom tooth on other day.

Dr. Vipin Gupta 89% (148 ratings)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Dentist has told to extract my sister wisdom tooth on Friday surgical procedure sunday there is function after extrac...
Hello prior before wisdom tooth extraction you must take three days medicine as per treatment approach. You inform your doctor that your sister Taking Madison till Sunday letter Monday she will extract the tooth.
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I want to do wisdom tooth extraction after two days. I don't want to take alopathic antibiotics & painkillers. So please tell prescribe me homeopathic medicines for wisdom tooth extraction.

Dr. Anshumali Srivastava 89% (1138 ratings)
BDS, MDS
Dentist, Gorakhpur
I want to do wisdom tooth extraction after two days. I don't want to take alopathic antibiotics & painkillers. So ple...
Your extraction will be done by a dentist and you do not have choice. Take allopathic medicines for the time till socket heals else asked some homeopathic doctor to remove the tooth and prescribe medicines.
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I have undergone surgical extraction of my last tooth yesterday (22/01/2017) but half of my tung tongue is still partial numb. What could be the reason. I guess the effect of LA should be gone by now as it is more than 27 hours. Kindly advise.

Dr. Isha Malhotra 93% (4756 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
I have undergone surgical extraction of my last tooth yesterday (22/01/2017) but half of my tung tongue is still part...
Yes it should have gone as you have undergone surgery. My advise would be to wait for a period of 7 days till stitches are removed only after that one can give advise accordingly.
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Osteoporosis - How It Impact Your Oral Health?

Dr. Premendra Goyal 92% (767 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
Osteoporosis - How It Impact Your Oral Health?

Osteoporosis is an age related condition characterized by low bone density and fragile bones. Lack of calcium and vitamin D are the most common triggers of this condition. These are vital elements for healthy teeth as well. Osteoporosis has a direct relationship with oral health and can trigger a number of issues such as loss of teeth and gum and periodontal disease. The effects of osteoporosis on oral health are seen more in women than in men. 

This risk increases when talking about menopausal women. 

The jawbone is one of the areas which bear the brunt of osteoporosis. The loss of bone density in this area can make teeth loose and cause tooth loss. It can also affect the gum ridges that hold dentures in their place. This can result in ill fitting dentures that need to be frequently changed. 

Medication for osteoporosis is also linked to dental health. In rare cases, antiresorptive medicines that are prescribed to strengthen the bones can lead to a condition known as osteonecrosis. This refers to the death of a bone due to poor blood supply. Antiresorptive medication can be administered orally or intravenously with the latter having a higher risk of triggering osteonecrosis. Though it affects the hips and shoulder bones in most cases, it can also affect the jaw bone. It is marked by pain, swelling, infection and exposed bone. Loose teeth, gum infections and numbness or heaviness of the jaw are also symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw bone. 

 The risk of suffering from osteonecrosis cannot be determined beforehand. Hence it is a good idea to see your dentist before or just after starting antiresorptive treatment for osteoporosis and to schedule regular checkups for the duration of your treatment. Dental problems if any should be treated before starting medication for osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw bone is most commonly seen after undergoing a dental procedure that affects the jawbone and associated tissues such as a tooth extraction. Ideally, invasive dental procedures should be avoided if you are taking antiresoptive medicines. However, it can also occur spontaneously. 

Biophosphonates are also commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis. This type of medication slows down the breakdown of bone tissue. However, this can lead to the development of new bones. This is not a troublesome issue when it comes to bones like the hip, leg or arm bones but can be very disruptive if it affects the jawbone. This is because the jaw bone is constantly reforming and reshaping itself.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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Oral And Dental Health

Dr. (Major) Varun Nischal 90% (317 ratings)
BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Oral And Dental Health

One of the most common complications of having a tooth taken out is developing a dry socket. A dry socket is when the blood clot that is supposed to be in the extraction site either doesn’t form or is displaced. This exposes the bone in the area causing a severe toothache type pain. Many of my patients have told me that the dry socket pain is worse than the toothache that caused the tooth to need to be extracted! This pain can last anywhere from a week up to 5 weeks. Most dry sockets resolve in the shorter end of that range and will always resolve on their own whether you seek treatment or not. Some types of treatment will actually extend the healing time so keep that in mind.

So how do you know if you have a dry socket? Most dry sockets follow a relatively predictable pattern.

  • Tooth pain from an extraction generally peaks and starts to quickly decrease within 24-48 hours after the extraction. A dry socket on the other hand usually starts 3-5 days after having a tooth taken out.
  • Dry sockets have a much higher incidence after removal of impacted wisdom teeth (especially bottom wisdom teeth) as well as after difficult extractions.
  • Risk factors include smoking, using straws, spitting, taking birth control medication, and the intake of hot liquids and foods in the first day or two after the extraction.
  • Oftentimes you’ll see a hollow area where the tooth came out and sometimes you can see or feel the exposed bone.
  • If you notice pus coming out of the area, it may be infected rather than a dry socket. This is much less likely than a dry socket but can cause similar pain and in a similar time frame. See your dentist for sure if you are concerned it may be infected.

It is important to realize that while a dry socket can be miserably painful, there are no health consequences associated with it. All treatment seeks to manage the symptoms until the area is able to heal on it’s own. Studies have been pretty inconclusive as to what treatment, if any, is best for managing dry sockets. Let’s take a look at some of the things you can do at home.

  • Practice prevention. Avoid smoking for as long as you can manage after the extraction. 3 days minimum and longer is better. Don’t use straws or spit. Avoid hot foods for the first day or two after the extraction.
  • Take 600-800 mg of Ibuprofen every 6 hours on the dot. If you only take it when it hurts you’ll get into a bad pain cycle that is hard to get out of. Staying ahead of the pain is important.
  • Rinse any debris out of the socket. Food tends to get trapped down in there and can cause problems. The easiest way to do this is with a curved monoject syringe. Your dentist usually has these or you can sometimes get them at a pharmacy. An alternative would be a standard oral medication syringe (like you’d use to give medications to kids). As long as you reach the tip into the socket, it’ll work fine. Put some water in it and gently rinse the socket out. Don’t be forceful as this can also displace blood clots.
  • DIY Dry Socket Medications – Most medication materials that dentist’s use for dry sockets have some combination of eugenol (oil of cloves) and an anesthetic such as benzocaine as well as some other minor ingredients. Oil of cloves and benzocaine are both medications you can purchase over the counter. The best thing to do is make a 50/50 mixture of these two things and dip a piece of cotton in it.  Take a pair of tweezers or something similar that can hold the cotton and push the cotton into the socket. Make sure your cotton piece is big enough that when you push it into the socket you have enough sticking out the top to remove it. Leave it in for a couple of minutes and then remove. You don’t want to leave this in the socket long term as it will slow/stop healing. This combination of medications will help relieve some of the pain and you can do this several times a day.
  • If all else fails, remember that the DENTIST is just a stone throw distance away!
1 person found this helpful

Peri Coronitis

Dr. A. K. Verma 90% (807 ratings)
Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Allahabad
Peri Coronitis
  • Pericoronitis is a type of impaction. This condition is most commonly found in mandibular 3rd molar tooth. It is a painful condition.
  • Treatment:- pericoronitis can be treated by either flap removal or extractions of the affected tooth.
2 people found this helpful
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