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Testicular Cancer Tips

All About Testicular Cancer!

All About Testicular Cancer!

Testicular cancer is mostly witnessed among young adults in the age range of 24–35. It results from the growth of abnormal cells in the testes. It is not the most common type of cancer found in the body, but can pose a serious threat to an individual if not treated early. The cure rate is one of the highest among all kinds of cancer found in the body. This being said, the rate of cure is totally dependent on the stage of detection.

Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer
The historical trend of testicular cancer suggests that white men are prone to this type of cancer than their African, Asian and Latino counterparts. A person with a family history of testicular cancer of HIV is at higher risk of getting this disease. Some other risk factors include Klinefelter’s syndrome and cryptorchidism.

Protection from Testicular Cancer
There is no hard and fast rule of protection. It is suggested that the testicles get evaluated while routine medical check-up. A person with a family history of testicular cancer should opt for a periodic checkup after every three months. In case a patient has already recovered from testicular cancer, routine medical tests are a must to ensure non-recurrence.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer
The common symptom is a swelling in the testicle. It feels like a thickening of the testicle and is mostly painless. Minor discomfort in the swelling region is often reported. Some other symptoms include back pain, ache in the scrotum and groin, change in the size of the testicle, bloating of the lower abdomen and heavy sensation of the scrotum. There is a rare form of this cancer, which produces a female hormone called estrogen in a man’s body. This disease results in a lack of sexual desire, lump in the affected area, etc. Even less serious testicular cancer might show these symptoms. An oncologist should be immediately consulted if one or more of these symptoms surfaces.

What are the treatment options?
Testicular cancer is mostly cured with the help of a surgery. A follow-up radiation and chemotherapy is suggested by doctors to destroy the surrounding cells. It is done to ensure that the cancer cells do not spread easily and the chance of recurrence is minimal. The rate of cure depends on early detection.

Does testicular cancer affect sexuality?
In most of the cases, testicular cancer is detected in one testicle. If this is the case, the other testicle produces all the hormones needed for sexual drive. It also does not affect sex drive, beard and muscularity. There is also a large section of patients who reported of a difficult sexual life after the surgery. There can be some discomfort in the scrotum as well.

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease - How To Handle It?

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease - How To Handle It?

Gestational trophoblastic disease is a rare condition. It only happens when trophoblast cells abnormally grow inside the uterus. Also, this only happens after conception. These cells surround the egg which has been fertilized in the uterus. It is also worth note that the trophoblast cells usually connect the fertilized eggs to the uterus' walls and also form a part of the placenta. It is only when there is a tumor that this disease is diagnosed. There are many forms of gestational trophoblastic disease. Here they are:

Types

1.        Complete hydatidiform moles
2.        Partial hydatidiform moles
3.        Invasive moles
4.        Choriocarcinomas
5.        Placental-site trophoblastic tumors (PSTT)
6.        Epithelioid trophoblastic tumors (ETT)

It is worth note that most of these diseases have different stages. The stage of how far the cancer has developed can be found out using the following techniques.

Testing for cancer

1.        Chest X-ray
This is simply an X-ray of the chest.

2.        MRI 
An MRI is an abbreviation of magnetic resonance imaging. It makes use of a form of magnet which transfers radio waves to a computer to find out what is going on within your body.

3.        CT scan
This is similar to an X-ray except that more detailed and larger pictures inside the body can be taken and the scan has a slightly different procedure.
There are several ways to treat it depending on how far the cancer has spread into the body. Here they are:

Treatment

1.        Surgery
Surgery is usually done while the mole is still non-cancerous. The chances of the mole becoming cancerous are increased by pregnancy. Therefore, it is crucial that you do not become pregnant until the surgery is complete.

2.        Chemotherapy
This is a less-ideal option but has to be taken if the mole has become cancerous. 
 

4974 people found this helpful

Testicular Cancer - Can It Affect Sexuality?

Testicular Cancer - Can It Affect Sexuality?

Testicular cancer is mostly witnessed among young adults in the age range of 24–35. It results from the growth of abnormal cells in the testes. It is not the most common type of cancer found in the body, but can pose a serious threat to an individual if not treated early. The cure rate is one of the highest among all kinds of cancer found in the body. This being said, the rate of cure is totally dependent on the stage of detection.

Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer

The historical trend of testicular cancer suggests that white men are prone to this type of cancer than their African, Asian and Latino counterparts. A person with a family history of testicular cancer of HIV is at higher risk of getting this disease. Some other risk factors include Klinefelter’s syndrome and cryptorchidism.

Protection from Testicular Cancer
There is no hard and fast rule of protection. It is suggested that the testicles get evaluated while routine medical check-up. A person with a family history of testicular cancer should opt for a periodic checkup after every three months. In case a patient has already recovered from testicular cancer, routine medical tests are a must to ensure non-recurrence.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

The common symptom is a swelling in the testicle. It feels like a thickening of the testicle and is mostly painless. Minor discomfort in the swelling region is often reported. Some other symptoms include back pain, ache in the scrotum and groin, change in the size of the testicle, bloating of the lower abdomen and heavy sensation of the scrotum. There is a rare form of this cancer, which produces a female hormone called estrogen in a man’s body. This disease results in a lack of sexual desire, lump in the affected area, etc. Even less serious testicular cancer might show these symptoms. An oncologist should be immediately consulted if one or more of these symptoms surfaces.

What are the treatment options?

Testicular cancer is mostly cured with the help of a surgery. A follow-up radiation and chemotherapy is suggested by doctors to destroy the surrounding cells. It is done to ensure that the cancer cells do not spread easily and the chance of recurrence is minimal. The rate of cure depends on early detection.

Does testicular cancer affect sexuality?

In most of the cases, testicular cancer is detected in one testicle. If this is the case, the other testicle produces all the hormones needed for sexual drive. It also does not affect sex drive, beard and muscularity. There is also a large section of patients who reported of a difficult sexual life after the surgery. There can be some discomfort in the scrotum as well.

3062 people found this helpful

Genitourinary Cancers - Know Forms Of It!

Genitourinary Cancers - Know Forms Of It!

Genitourinary cancer is found in the urinary tract and reproductive system of males. Genitourinary cancer consists of kidney cancer, urinary bladder cancer, testicular, and penis cancer.

The urinary system is responsible for getting rid of the urine and waste fluid out of the human body. It keeps in check the level of potassium and sodium in the body and helps the body to get rid of excess fluid waste. The urinary system consists of kidney, urinary bladder, and urethra. Cancer in any part of the urinary system comes under the classification of Genitourinary Cancers.

The male reproductive system is responsible for maintaining potent sperms and healthy reproduction. It manages the sex hormones in the system and hence connected to the fertility in men. It consists of the prostate, testicles, and penis. Genitourinary cancers in men are generally connected with the cancer cell growth in the reproductive system.

Cancer is the abnormal mass in the organ of the human body where the cells are growing abnormally and cannot be controlled.

Types of Genitourinary Cancer:

Following are some of the types of Genitourinary Cancer are:

Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer is very dangerous and generally found in the adult. The cell grows rapidly in kidney cancer and leading to the death of the patient if not treated in time. The symptoms include bloody urine, pain in the back, and loss of appetite. There are no specific causes of kidney cancer. However, patients who are persistently facing symptoms should consult expert oncologist and get yourself treated. The prevention you can take is quit smoking, maintain a healthy weight, and control high blood pressure.

Urinary Bladder Cancer

Urinary Bladder cancer also comes under the study of Genitourinary cancer where cancer is grown primarily in the urinary bladder of the patient. The early symptoms of urinary bladder cancer are bloody urination, irritation while urinating, pain in urination, and change in urinary bladder habits. These symptoms are often mixed with UTI, and sometimes the patient does not know if these are the symptoms of cancer.

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer refers to cancer in the testicles which are in the scrotum of the male reproductive system. The main symptoms of testicular cancer are feeling of a lump in the scrotum, feeling heaviness in the testicles, back pain, and pain in the penis. It is advisable to see an oncologist when you feel swelling or pain in the scrotum area. The cause for this type of Genitourinary cancer is unknown and but they are treatable even when cancer has advanced.

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer found in men. However, this type of Genitourinary cancer is not harmful and may even not need any treatment. Cancer grows very slowly and does not need advanced medicines. The prostate cancer may die with time. Some of the common symptoms of prostate cancer are blood in semen, trouble urinating, bone pain, and erectile dysfunction.

Cancer patients with Genitourinary cancers need special care and medication. The cancer is difficult to determine, but should be treated within time else can be life-threatening. Visit genitourinary cancer specialists for better assessment and correct treatment procedure.

2923 people found this helpful

Testicular Cancer - Know Its Risks!

Testicular Cancer - Know Its Risks!

Here are a few things you should know about Testicular Cancer (TC): 

  1. Age: The commonest affected age group is 20-45 years with germ cell tumours. Half of all cases occur in men less than 35 years. Non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) are more common at ages 20-35, while seminoma is more common at age 35-45 years. Rarely, infants and boys below 10 years develop yolk sac tumours and 50% men above 60 years with TC have lymphoma.
  2. Race: White Caucasian people living in Europe and the US have the highest risk. Whites are three times more likely to develop TC than blacks in the US. With the exception of the New Zealand Maoris, TC is rare in non-Caucasian races.
  3. Previous TC: Confers a 12-fold increased risk of metachronous TC. Bilateral TC occurs in 1-2% of cases.
  4. Cryptorchidism: 5-10% of TC patients have a history of cryptorchidism. Ultrastructural changes are present in these testes by age 3 years, although earlier orchidopexy does not completely eliminate the risk of developing TC. According to a large Swedish study, cryptorchidism is associated with a two-fold increased risk of TC in men who underwent orchiopexy less than 13 year, but risk is increased 5-fold in men who underwent orchiopexy aged above13 years. A meta-analysis showed risk of contralateral TC almost doubles while ipsilateral TC risk is increased 6-fold in men with unilateral cryptorchidism.
  5. Intratubular germ cell neoplasia (testicular intraepithelial neoplasia, TIN): Synonymous with carcinoma in situ, although the disease arises from malignant change in spermatogonia; 50% of cases develop invasive germ cell TC within 5 years. The population incidence is 0.8%. Risk factors include cryptorchidism, extragonadal germ cell tumour, atrophic contralateral testis, 45XO karyotype, Klinefelter's syndrome, previous or contralateral TC (5%), and infertility.
  6. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): Patients develop seminoma 35% more frequently than expected. Genetic factors: appear to play a role, given that first-degree relatives are at higher risk by 4-9-fold, but a defined familial inheritance pattern is not apparent.
  7. Maternal oestrogen exposure: At higher than usual levels during pregnancy appears to increase risk of cryptorchidism, urethral anomalies, and TC in male offspring.

Trauma and viral-induced atrophy have not been convincingly implicated as risk factors for TC.

2081 people found this helpful

Cancer - 9 Common Misconceptions About It!

Cancer - 9 Common Misconceptions About It!

Cancer, or the big C, is always in the news. Use any keyword related to cancer, and there is definitely information overload. Also, with more people surviving cancer, there are too many tales to tell. All this leads to misconceptions and myths, leaving people, who are looking for genuine information, completely confused.

The following are some common misconceptions:

  1. Cancer is a new-age disease: There is reference to cancer in ancient Egyptian and Greek stories, so cancer is definitely not new. However, it is true that the incidence has increased tremendously with the modern lifestyle habits.
  2. Food items prevent cancer: There are claims that food items like kale, blueberries, green tea, broccoli, etc., can prevent cancer. It is not true. They do have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but are not helpful in preventing cancer.
  3. Acidic diet causes cancer: The body’s pH is not determined by the food products that we consume. Neither acidic nor alkaline environment is healthy, and further, the body has its own mechanism to regulate pH; so go ahead and eat what you like.
  4. Sugars cause cancer: Sugar, believed to be the main energy source, is required for growth. Since cancer is linked to uncontrolled growth, it is believed that more sugar leads to more cancer. This again is a false notion, as there is no connection between the two.
  5. Screening is only for breast cancer: Agreed, breast cancer is easy to screen for, but any person with predisposition can go for periodic screening to help in early identification and intervention.
  6. Cancer medicines kill more than they cure: Whether it is chemotherapy or radiation, they do not pick only the cancer cells. When directed at a body part, the radiation affects the entire area. Chemotherapy targets and controls growth of a lot of normal processes, thereby affecting normal life.
  7. There is no cure for cancer: It is not a simple process. Curing cancer involves multiple facets – some of which may not be known or unearthed. While there are some stories, which talk about how they conquered cancer completely, there are a greater number of failures. Do not conclude on either side. Each person and each type of cancer is treated differently.
  8. Tight undergarments are not connected to cancer: As popularly advertised, tight underwear and underwired bras do not cause testicular or breast cancer.
  9. Biopsies spread cancer: This is a misconception. Most people are scared to get a biopsy as they perceive that it may spread the cancerous cells to normal areas.

This is just a short list, and there are far too many false notions. Check with your doctor to validate the information before using it to take any decision.

 

3575 people found this helpful

Testicular Cancer - Does It Affect Sexuality?

Testicular Cancer -  Does It Affect Sexuality?

Testicular cancer is mostly witnessed among young adults in the age range of 24–35. It results from the growth of abnormal cells in the testes. It is not the most common type of cancer found in the body, but can pose a serious threat to an individual if not treated early. The cure rate is one of the highest among all kinds of cancer found in the body. This being said, the rate of cure is totally dependent on the stage of detection.

Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer

The historical trend of testicular cancer suggests that white men are prone to this type of cancer than their African, Asian and Latino counterparts. A person with a family history of testicular cancer of HIV is at higher risk of getting this disease. Some other risk factors include Klinefelter’s syndrome and cryptorchidism.

Protection from Testicular Cancer

There is no hard and fast rule of protection. It is suggested that the testicles get evaluated while routine medical check-up. A person with a family history of testicular cancer should opt for a periodic checkup after every three months. In case a patient has already recovered from testicular cancer, routine medical tests are a must to ensure non-recurrence.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

The common symptom is a swelling in the testicle. It feels like a thickening of the testicle and is mostly painless. Minor discomfort in the swelling region is often reported. Some other symptoms include back pain, ache in the scrotum and groin, change in the size of the testicle, bloating of the lower abdomen and heavy sensation of the scrotum. There is a rare form of this cancer, which produces a female hormone called estrogen in a man’s body. This disease results in a lack of sexual desire, lump in the affected area, etc. Even less serious testicular cancer might show these symptoms. An oncologist should be immediately consulted if one or more of these symptoms surfaces.

What are the treatment options?

Testicular cancer is mostly cured with the help of a surgery. A follow-up radiation and chemotherapy is suggested by doctors to destroy the surrounding cells. It is done to ensure that the cancer cells do not spread easily and the chance of recurrence is minimal. The rate of cure depends on early detection.

Does testicular cancer affect sexuality?

In most of the cases, testicular cancer is detected in one testicle. If this is the case, the other testicle produces all the hormones needed for sexual drive. It also does not affect sex drive, beard and muscularity. There is also a large section of patients who reported of a difficult sexual life after the surgery. There can be some discomfort in the scrotum as well.

3192 people found this helpful

All You Need To Know About Testicular Cancer!

All You Need To Know About Testicular Cancer!

Testicular cancer is mostly witnessed among young adults in the age range of 24–35. It results from the growth of abnormal cells in the testes. It is not the most common type of cancer found in the body but can pose a serious threat to an individual if not treated early. The cure rate is one of the highest among all kinds of cancer found in the body. This being said, the rate of cure is totally dependent on the stage of detection.

Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer:

The historical trend of testicular cancer suggests that white men are prone to this type of cancer than their African, Asian and Latino counterparts. A person with a family history of testicular cancer of HIV is at higher risk of getting this disease. Some other risk factors include Klinefelter’s syndrome and cryptorchidism.

Protection from Testicular Cancer:

There is no hard and fast rule of protection. It is suggested that the testicles get evaluated while routine medical check-up. A person with a family history of testicular cancer should opt for a periodic checkup after every three months. In case a patient has already recovered from testicular cancer, routine medical tests are a must to catch early in the event of recurrence.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer:

The common symptom is a swelling in the testicle. It feels like a thickening of the testicle and is mostly painless. Minor discomfort in the swelling region is often reported. Some other symptoms include back pain, ache in the scrotum and groin, change in the size of the testicle, bloating of the lower abdomen and heavy sensation of the scrotum. There is a rare form of this cancer, which produces a female hormone called estrogen in a man’s body. This disease results in a lack of sexual desire, lump in the affected area, etc. Even less serious testicular cancer might show these symptoms. An oncologist should be immediately consulted if one or more of these symptoms surfaces.

What are the treatment options?

Testicular cancer is mostly cured with the help of surgery. Following which radiation and chemotherapy are suggested by doctors to destroy the surrounding cells. It is done to ensure that the cancer cells do not spread easily and the chance of recurrence is minimal. The rate of cure depends on stage and type of cancer cells.

Does testicular cancer affect sexuality?

In most of the cases, testicular cancer is detected in one testicle. If this is the case, the other testicle produces all the hormones needed for sexual drive. It also does not affect sex drive, beard and muscularity. There is also a large section of patients who reported a difficult sexual life after the surgery. There can be some discomfort in the scrotum as well.

1 person found this helpful

Testicular Cancer - How To Track It?

Testicular Cancer - How To Track It?

Testicular cancer is mostly witnessed among young adults in the age range of 24–35. It results from the growth of abnormal cells in the testes. It is not the most common type of cancer found in the body, but can pose a serious threat to an individual if not treated early. The cure rate is one of the highest among all kinds of cancer found in the body. This being said, the rate of cure is totally dependent on the stage of detection.

Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer
The historical trend of testicular cancer suggests that white men are prone to this type of cancer than their African, Asian and Latino counterparts. A person with a family history of testicular cancer of HIV is at higher risk of getting this disease. Some other risk factors include Klinefelter’s syndrome and cryptorchidism.

Protection from Testicular Cancer
There is no hard and fast rule of protection. It is suggested that the testicles get evaluated while routine medical check-up. A person with a family history of testicular cancer should opt for a periodic checkup after every three months. In case a patient has already recovered from testicular cancer, routine medical tests are a must to ensure non-recurrence.

Symptoms of Testicular Cancer
The common symptom is a swelling in the testicle. It feels like a thickening of the testicle and is mostly painless. Minor discomfort in the swelling region is often reported. Some other symptoms include back pain, ache in the scrotum and groin, change in the size of the testicle, bloating of the lower abdomen and heavy sensation of the scrotum. There is a rare form of this cancer, which produces a female hormone called estrogen in a man’s body. This disease results in a lack of sexual desire, lump in the affected area, etc. Even less serious testicular cancer might show these symptoms. An oncologist should be immediately consulted if one or more of these symptoms surfaces.

What are the treatment options?
Testicular cancer is mostly cured with the help of a surgery. A follow-up radiation and chemotherapy is suggested by doctors to destroy the surrounding cells. It is done to ensure that the cancer cells do not spread easily and the chance of recurrence is minimal. The rate of cure depends on early detection.

Does testicular cancer affect sexuality?
In most of the cases, testicular cancer is detected in one testicle. If this is the case, the other testicle produces all the hormones needed for sexual drive. It also does not affect sex drive, beard and muscularity. There is also a large section of patients who reported of a difficult sexual life after the surgery. There can be some discomfort in the scrotum as well.

2924 people found this helpful

Testicular Trauma - Diagnosis And Treatment!

Testicular Trauma - Diagnosis And Treatment!

It may sound queer, but it is true, testicular trauma is a condition wherein one or both the testicles experience an injury. Any kind of accident can lead to testicular injuries. Although some common ones include:

  1. Bicycle or motorbike injuries
  2. Being hit by a football or a cricket ball
  3. Being kicked

Other few and severe causes of injury include bullet wounds, animal bites, injuries or accidents because of the wrong usage of tools or machinery. Not surprisingly, it can happen during sexual intercourse too.

The types of testicular injuries
Testicular trauma can be of various types. Some typical ones include:

  1. Rupture: Also known as testicular rupture, such injuries involve tearing of the coarse, protective layer around the testicles.
  2. Fracture: In such cases, the testicular tissue breaks down, causing excruciating pain.
  3. Contusion: When an accident causes an injury to the blood vessels, it can lead to contusion.
  4. Infection: Insect bites to the scrotum can cause infections.

Symptoms of testicular injuries
As you might recall from prior experience, a testicular injury causes crunching pain within the scrotum. Pain in the abdomen might also accompany the above mentioned symptom. Some further symptoms include:

  1. Feeling nauseated
  2. Sustaining bruises or swelling of the scrotum
  3. Experiencing difficulty while urinating (although this is not common)
  4. Fever (this is uncommon as well)

Some serious injuries can also cause sexual problems and even fertility issues.

Diagnosis and treatment
Most minor injuries get healed within minutes or hours. But for any serious injury sustained, you have to visit a doctor. The doctor would ask you questions regarding how and when it occurred after which you could be advised to go through imaging and ultrasound tests. After diagnosing the extent of the condition, the doctor may prescribe antibiotics or other medications. Although home remedies such as applying ice packs on the affected area also helps.

3242 people found this helpful
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