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Splinting Tips

Shin Splints - Know Treatment For It!

Dr. Chirag Dalal 89% (27 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Mumbai
Shin Splints - Know Treatment For It!

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes

When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.


Some other causes of shin splints are 

1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
3. Not using proper form during training
4. Lack of flexibility
5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints


Symptoms

The symptoms of shin splints are: 

1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
3. Tenderness around the shin area
4. Numbness around the shin area
5. Inflammation in the shin area
6. You may experience severe pain while walking


Treatment

The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition.

Shin Splints - How To Treat It?

Dr. Atul Mishra 86% (16 ratings)
Fellowship In Joint Replacement, MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Shin Splints - How To Treat It?

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3874 people found this helpful

How To Treat Shin Splints?

Dr. Sagar Kelkar 82% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Nashik
How To Treat Shin Splints?

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition.

2205 people found this helpful

Shin Splints

Dr. Sujitkumar Vakati R 92% (68 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, M Ch. Ortho
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
Shin Splints

Shin splints, the catch-all term for lower leg pain that occurs below the knee either on the front outside part of the leg (anterior shin splints) or the inside of the leg (medial shin splints), are the bane of many athletes, runners, tennis players, even dancers. They often plague beginning runners who do not build their mileage gradually enough or seasoned runners who abruptly change their workout regimen, suddenly adding too much mileage, for example, or switching from running on flat surfaces to hills.
 
The nature of shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome (mtss), most often can be captured in four words: too much, too soon.
 
Treating shin pain from shin splints with ice pack
 
Identifying symptoms of shin splints

  • Shin pain doesn’t always mean you have shin splints. It might be a sign of some other problem. The following are two conditions that are sometimes mistakenly diagnosed as shin splints.
  • Pain on the anterior (outside) part of the lower leg may be compartment syndrome—a swelling of muscles within a closed compartment—which creates pressure. To diagnose this condition, special techniques are used to measure the amount of pressure. Sometimes surgical “decompression” is required. The symptoms of compartment syndrome include leg pain, unusual nerve sensations, and eventually muscle weakness.
  • Pain in the lower leg could also be a stress fracture (an incomplete crack in the bone), which is a far more serious injury than shin splints. A bone scan is the definitive tool for diagnosing a stress fracture. However, there are clues you can look for that will signal whether or not you should get a bone scan.
  • The pain of shin splints is also more generalized than that of a stress fracture. Press your fingertips along your shin, and if you can find a definite spot of sharp pain, it’s a sign of a stress fracture. Additionally, stress fractures often feel better in the morning because the bone has rested all night; they often feel worse in the morning because the soft tissue tightens overnight. Shin splints are also at their most painful when you forcibly try to lift your foot up at the ankle and flex your foot. 

Common causes of shin splints

  • There can be a number of factors at work, such as overpronation (a frequent cause of medial shin splints), inadequate stretching, worn shoes, or excessive stress placed on one leg or one hip from running on cambered roads or always running in the same direction on a track. Typically, one leg is involved and it is almost always the runner’s dominant one. If you’re right-handed, you’re usually right-footed as well, and that’s the leg that’s going to hurt. 
  • The most common site for shin splints is the medial area (the inside of the shin). Anterior shin splints (toward the outside of the leg) usually result from an imbalance between the calf muscles and the muscles in the front of your leg, and often afflict beginners who either have not yet adjusted to the stresses of running or are not stretching enough. 
  • But what exactly is a shin splint? there’s no end-all consensus among sports scientists, and theories have included small tears in the muscle that’s pulled off the bone, an inflammation of the periosteum [a thin sheath of tissue that wraps around the tibia, or shin bone], an inflammation of the muscle, or some combination of these. Fortunately, medical experts agree on how to treat them.

 
Treatment of shin splints

  • Experts agree that when shin splints strike you should stop running completely or decrease your training depending on the extent and duration of pain. Then, as a first step, ice your shin to reduce inflammation. Here are some other treatments you can try:
  • Gently stretch your achilles if you have medial shin splints, and your calves if you have anterior shin splints. Also, try this stretch for your shins: kneel on a carpeted floor, legs and feet together and toes pointed directly back. Then slowly sit back onto your calves and heels, pushing your ankles into the floor until you feel tension in the muscles of your shin. Hold for 10 to 12 seconds, relax and repeat.
  • In a sitting position, trace the alphabet on the floor with your toes. Do this with each leg. Or alternate walking on your heels for 30 seconds with 30 seconds of regular walking. Repeat four times. These exercises are good for both recovery and prevention. Try to do them three times a day.
  • If you continue running, wrap your leg before you go out. Use either tape or an ace bandage, starting just above the ankle and continuing to just below the knee. Keep wrapping your leg until the pain goes away, which usually takes three to six weeks. “what you’re doing is binding the tendons up against the shaft of the shin to prevent stress,” laps says.
  • Consider cross-training for a while to let your shin heal. Swim, run in the pool or ride a bike.
  • When you return to running, increase your mileage slowly, no more than 10 percent weekly.
  • Make sure you wear the correct running shoes for your foot type specifically, overpronators should wear motion-control shoes. Severe overpronators may need orthotics.
  • Have two pairs of shoes and alternate wearing them to vary the stresses on your legs.
  • Avoid hills and excessively hard surfaces until shin pain goes away completely, then re-introduce them gradually to prevent a recurrence.
  • If you frequently run on roads with an obvious camber, run out and back on the same side of the road. Likewise, when running on a track, switch directions.
  • If you are prone to developing shin splints, stretch your calves and achilles regularly as a preventive measure.

Shin Splints - Causes And Symptoms!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Chennai
Shin Splints - Causes And Symptoms!

Shin splints is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

4464 people found this helpful

6 Symptoms Of Shin Splints!

Dr. Kedar Phadke 92% (84 ratings)
Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), DNB (Orthopedics), Diploma SICOT, Fellowship in Spine Surgery, Fellowship in Endoscopic Spine Surgery
Orthopedist, Vadodara
6 Symptoms Of Shin Splints!

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:

The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

2692 people found this helpful

Nasal Reconstruction Surgery - Types And Symptoms

Dr. Sasikumar 88% (65 ratings)
MCh - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, MS - General Surgery, MBBS
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Chennai
Nasal Reconstruction Surgery - Types And Symptoms

A Nasal reconstruction surgery is required to correct deformities in the nasal area formed as a result of birth defects, injuries, trauma etc. It is also used to correct missing parts of the nasal anatomy if required. Recent developments in techniques such as microsurgery, expansion of the tissue and so on, have helped surgeons improve the methods of nasal reconstruction surgery to a great extent. At this point, a patient has a great number of reconstruction methods to choose from, depending on his/her particular case.

Types of Nasal Reconstruction Surgery:

  1. Local flaps
  2. Regional flaps
  3. Secondary Intention Healing
  4. Simple Suture closure
  5. Skin grafts
  6. One stage nasolabial flap
  7. Two stage nasolabial flap
  8. Forehead flap
  9. Bone and Cartilage frame work reconstruction

Indicators of the need for Nasal Reconstruction surgery

  1. One indicator of the need for this type of surgery is fractures in the nose that have changed the shape of the organ. Patients opt for this kind of surgery in order to improve their overall appearance.
  2. Another indicator is fractures or other deformities that lead to breathing problems. Living with such problems is difficult; hence it is important to get nasal reconstruction surgery.
  3. The presence of the Deviated Nasal Septum prevents proper breathing and increases vulnerability to ENT infections. Nasal reconstruction surgery can be used to fix this problem.
  4. Deformities formed as a result of treatment of skin cancer can be fixed with the help of nasal reconstruction surgery.

Things to know about recovering from Nasal Reconstruction Surgery

  1. Medication taken orally can help to counter the discomfort experienced right after a nasal reconstruction surgery.
  2. Usually, splints are used inside the nose during the surgery. These are generally removed within a week.
  3. Patients are able to get up and walk about within a few days. Normal daily activities may be resumed upon the doctor's instructions.
  4. At times, a swelling may be observed in the nasal area, but this goes away within a few weeks. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a cosmetic surgeon.
3168 people found this helpful

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome - How Physiotherapy Can Help You?

Dr. Nikita Paprunia 92% (252 ratings)
Physiotherapist, Latur
Cubital Tunnel Syndrome  - How Physiotherapy Can Help You?

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is also known as Ulnar Neuropathy, a nerve compression syndrome where the Ulnar nerve, also known as the funny bone nerve, gets compressed due to heightened pressure or stretching. It can lead to numbness or a tingling sensation in little and ring fingers, sometimes pain in forearm and an overall weakness in the hand. Ulnar nerve is one of the three main nerves in the arm. It runs in a groove on the inner side of the elbow. Since it travels through a narrow space and has very little protective tissue, the nerve is quite vulnerable to compression.

Symptoms
The symptoms of this condition may range from mild to severe. Some of the mild symptoms include:

  1. Numbness in little and ring finger as the fingers fall asleep
  2. A tingling sensation, usually like the pinch of pins and needles in ring and little finger
  3. Pain in forearm
  4. Weakness in the hand
  5. Some of the severe symptoms include:
  6. Reduction in overall hand grip
  7. A claw like deformity in hand
  8. Wasting of muscles of the hand

Bending elbow over a long period of time like while using cell phone or during sleep can cause ulnar nerve compression. Resting the elbow for a long period over a hard surface can also cause an irritation of the nerve, leading to such symptoms. In some cases, the nerve snaps back and forth over a bony bump, resulting in an irritated nerve. People who undertake intense physical activity, especially using their arms, are more likely to develop this problem. Eg. baseball pitchers. Apart from this, people who have suffered from a dislocated elbow or have arthritis are also at risk.


Generally, doctors diagnose this condition through the symptoms. However, nerve tests are also conducted to check the level of nerve compression. Electromyography is a procedure in which electrodes are placed on the skin and muscles to measure muscle health. Determining muscle health and level of compression helps decide the mode of treatment. Generally, the symptoms of cubital tunnel syndrome are managed through a conservative treatment. However, in cases of severe compression, surgery can be considered as an option to relieve pressure, moving nerve to the front of the elbow or removing a part of the bone.

For mild cases, a towel or a protective cover for elbow is recommended. The towel should be wrapped around the elbow loosely. An elbow splint can be worn at night to protect the elbow from being bent for long time.

How can a physical therapist help?
A physiotherapist has an essential role to play in treatment of this syndrome. A therapist can help the patient to learn ways of avoiding pressure to the nerve. After surgery, with restrictions of movement, a therapist can help achieve smooth recovery and movement of the elbow. Your physical therapist will determine the activities that bring on your symptoms. The recommendations at this point will be to avoid those activities for a time. Remember, the nerve is irritated and at times swollen. If the irritation and swelling are reduced, the symptoms should resolve. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a physiotherapist.

2934 people found this helpful

All about rhinoplasty

Dr. Anubhav Gupta 88% (41 ratings)
DNB, MCh - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, MS - Plastic Surgery, MBBS
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Delhi
All about rhinoplasty

Rhinoplasty, more commonly known as nose surgery, is a cosmetic form of operation designed to change the shape and size of the nose. 


A rhinoplasty can effectively change the size and width of the nose to complement the facial balance. It also helps improve nasal symmetry efficiently enhancing your facial features.
How is the surgery performed?
You can opt for either general anesthesia or local anesthesia for the surgery. The surgery is generally an outpatient procedure, but occasionally patients are asked to stay in the hospital overnight post the surgery.


The operation involves an incision which is made for easy access to the cartilage and bones of the nose. These incisions are generally placed inside the nose, so that they do not appear as scar marks after the surgery is done. Removal or replacement of the bone or cartilage depends on the demands of the restructuring of the nose. Once the reshaping of the nose is done, the nose tissue is put back into place and a splint is temporarily placed to support the new structure of the nose. The splint is removed once the nose heals. 


Precautions to take after a nose surgery


After a nose surgery, the area around your nose will stay swollen and bruised for a considerable period of time. Thus you have to ensure that-


1.  You get ample amount of rest 
2.  Use cold compresses over the swollen nose area, this will reduce the swelling and ease the pain
3.  Do not indulge in relatively vigorous physical activity for sometime 
4.  Take you medicines regularly


Risks of nose surgery


Every surgery or medical procedure involves certain risks, and so does rhinoplasty. Along with some puffiness and bruising around the eye and nose region, you may also experience-


1.  Some amount of bleeding 
2.  Injury to the septum area
3.  Irritation of the skin and skin problems 
4.  Infections 
5.  Nasal blockage due to swelling in the inner nasal area 
6.  Complications resulting from anesthesia 
Although there are certain risks to rhinoplasty, the surgery is considerably safe and the results are quite permanent. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a cosmetic-plastic-surgeon.

3633 people found this helpful

Dislocated Kneecap Symptoms and Treatment

Dr. Sanjay Kapoor 87% (219 ratings)
M. Ch. (Orthopedic), MS - Orthopaedics, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), MBBS
Orthopedist, Gurgaon
Dislocated Kneecap   Symptoms and Treatment

Whether you are an athlete or a ballet dancer, you will appreciate the importance of having a stable kneecap. Medically known as the patella, the kneecap is a triangular bone that connects the upper thigh to the lower half of the leg. It sits in a groove in the bottom of the femur (thigh bone). When the leg is bent, it stays within the groove. When the leg is extended, it provides support to the quadriceps muscles.

That being the case, a dislocation of the kneecap is a very common injury. Subluxation is a state where there is partial movement of the kneecap out of its position, thereby making the patient’s kneecap unstable. When it completely moves out of its place, it is known as dislocation. Whether you fall on your knees during a sport or have a fall from a bike or get injured during dance or aerobics, it is common to have a dislocated kneecap. Some people are prone to repeated dislocations.

Symptoms:

The initial injury is very painful and there might also be damage to the surrounding structures. Other symptoms include:

  1. Buckling of the knee, where your legs cannot support your body weight

  2. Sliding of the kneecap to a side

  3. Catching of the knee in the groove when trying to move it

  4. Pain in the front of the kneecap with any activity

  5. Painful while sitting

  6. Swelling and/or stiffness of the knee joint

  7. Crackling/creaking sound when trying to move the knee joint

  8. Inability to straighten the leg

Treatment:

Though these sound scary, the good news is that in 90% of the cases, the knee returns to its position spontaneously. However, putting it back into its place is a simple and safe procedure and can be done by almost any seasoned medical practitioner. The first step is to confirm that the kneecap is indeed dislocated. This can be done by a combination of physical exercise and x-ray. If required, MRI can be used, but it is not required in most cases. Initial treatment would include the following steps in sequence:

  1. Immobilizing the knee with splint by keeping the leg in a straightened position.

  2. Calling for medical assistance immediately. They can replace the knee back in its position carefully (reduction). An injured kneecap can cause what is known as foot drop by putting pressure on the peroneal nerve. The toes drag on the ground, making it difficult for you to walk.

  3. Use ice in the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes, and repeat after three to four hours throughout the day to reduce pain and swelling.

  4. Surgical correction may not be required, if there is a damage to the ligament.

  5. Flat femur and/or tissue laxity can cause repeated dislocations, where physiotherapy and strengthening exercises are useful. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a physiotherapist.
2725 people found this helpful
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