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Shin Splints Tips

Shin Splints - Know Treatment For It!

Dr. Chirag Dalal 92% (27 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Mumbai
Shin Splints - Know Treatment For It!

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes

When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.


Some other causes of shin splints are 

1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
3. Not using proper form during training
4. Lack of flexibility
5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints


Symptoms

The symptoms of shin splints are: 

1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
3. Tenderness around the shin area
4. Numbness around the shin area
5. Inflammation in the shin area
6. You may experience severe pain while walking


Treatment

The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition.

Shin Splints - How To Treat It?

Dr. Atul Mishra 86% (16 ratings)
Fellowship In Joint Replacement, MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Shin Splints - How To Treat It?

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3874 people found this helpful

How To Treat Shin Splints?

Dr. Sagar Kelkar 84% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Nashik
How To Treat Shin Splints?

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition.

2205 people found this helpful

Shin Splints

Dr. Sujitkumar Vakati R 92% (68 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, M Ch. Ortho
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
Shin Splints

Shin splints, the catch-all term for lower leg pain that occurs below the knee either on the front outside part of the leg (anterior shin splints) or the inside of the leg (medial shin splints), are the bane of many athletes, runners, tennis players, even dancers. They often plague beginning runners who do not build their mileage gradually enough or seasoned runners who abruptly change their workout regimen, suddenly adding too much mileage, for example, or switching from running on flat surfaces to hills.
 
The nature of shin splints, also known as medial tibial stress syndrome (mtss), most often can be captured in four words: too much, too soon.
 
Treating shin pain from shin splints with ice pack
 
Identifying symptoms of shin splints

  • Shin pain doesn’t always mean you have shin splints. It might be a sign of some other problem. The following are two conditions that are sometimes mistakenly diagnosed as shin splints.
  • Pain on the anterior (outside) part of the lower leg may be compartment syndrome—a swelling of muscles within a closed compartment—which creates pressure. To diagnose this condition, special techniques are used to measure the amount of pressure. Sometimes surgical “decompression” is required. The symptoms of compartment syndrome include leg pain, unusual nerve sensations, and eventually muscle weakness.
  • Pain in the lower leg could also be a stress fracture (an incomplete crack in the bone), which is a far more serious injury than shin splints. A bone scan is the definitive tool for diagnosing a stress fracture. However, there are clues you can look for that will signal whether or not you should get a bone scan.
  • The pain of shin splints is also more generalized than that of a stress fracture. Press your fingertips along your shin, and if you can find a definite spot of sharp pain, it’s a sign of a stress fracture. Additionally, stress fractures often feel better in the morning because the bone has rested all night; they often feel worse in the morning because the soft tissue tightens overnight. Shin splints are also at their most painful when you forcibly try to lift your foot up at the ankle and flex your foot. 

Common causes of shin splints

  • There can be a number of factors at work, such as overpronation (a frequent cause of medial shin splints), inadequate stretching, worn shoes, or excessive stress placed on one leg or one hip from running on cambered roads or always running in the same direction on a track. Typically, one leg is involved and it is almost always the runner’s dominant one. If you’re right-handed, you’re usually right-footed as well, and that’s the leg that’s going to hurt. 
  • The most common site for shin splints is the medial area (the inside of the shin). Anterior shin splints (toward the outside of the leg) usually result from an imbalance between the calf muscles and the muscles in the front of your leg, and often afflict beginners who either have not yet adjusted to the stresses of running or are not stretching enough. 
  • But what exactly is a shin splint? there’s no end-all consensus among sports scientists, and theories have included small tears in the muscle that’s pulled off the bone, an inflammation of the periosteum [a thin sheath of tissue that wraps around the tibia, or shin bone], an inflammation of the muscle, or some combination of these. Fortunately, medical experts agree on how to treat them.

 
Treatment of shin splints

  • Experts agree that when shin splints strike you should stop running completely or decrease your training depending on the extent and duration of pain. Then, as a first step, ice your shin to reduce inflammation. Here are some other treatments you can try:
  • Gently stretch your achilles if you have medial shin splints, and your calves if you have anterior shin splints. Also, try this stretch for your shins: kneel on a carpeted floor, legs and feet together and toes pointed directly back. Then slowly sit back onto your calves and heels, pushing your ankles into the floor until you feel tension in the muscles of your shin. Hold for 10 to 12 seconds, relax and repeat.
  • In a sitting position, trace the alphabet on the floor with your toes. Do this with each leg. Or alternate walking on your heels for 30 seconds with 30 seconds of regular walking. Repeat four times. These exercises are good for both recovery and prevention. Try to do them three times a day.
  • If you continue running, wrap your leg before you go out. Use either tape or an ace bandage, starting just above the ankle and continuing to just below the knee. Keep wrapping your leg until the pain goes away, which usually takes three to six weeks. “what you’re doing is binding the tendons up against the shaft of the shin to prevent stress,” laps says.
  • Consider cross-training for a while to let your shin heal. Swim, run in the pool or ride a bike.
  • When you return to running, increase your mileage slowly, no more than 10 percent weekly.
  • Make sure you wear the correct running shoes for your foot type specifically, overpronators should wear motion-control shoes. Severe overpronators may need orthotics.
  • Have two pairs of shoes and alternate wearing them to vary the stresses on your legs.
  • Avoid hills and excessively hard surfaces until shin pain goes away completely, then re-introduce them gradually to prevent a recurrence.
  • If you frequently run on roads with an obvious camber, run out and back on the same side of the road. Likewise, when running on a track, switch directions.
  • If you are prone to developing shin splints, stretch your calves and achilles regularly as a preventive measure.

Shin Splints - Causes And Symptoms!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Chennai
Shin Splints - Causes And Symptoms!

Shin splints is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:
The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

4464 people found this helpful

6 Symptoms Of Shin Splints!

Dr. Kedar Phadke 92% (84 ratings)
Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), DNB (Orthopedics), Diploma SICOT, Fellowship in Spine Surgery, Fellowship in Endoscopic Spine Surgery
Orthopedist, Vadodara
6 Symptoms Of Shin Splints!

Shin splints' is a condition, which is characterized by pain in the shin bone, the bone that is present in front of the leg. Shin splints tend to occur quite frequently in runners and dancers as their activities tend to stress the shin bone.

Causes: When excess force is applied to the shinbone, it may result in swelling of the muscles, causing pain and inflammation. It may also occur from stress reactions to fractures in the bone. Cracks tend to develop due to constant application of force in the bones. If the area is not well rested then these cracks will not heal and ultimately lead to a complete fracture.

Some other causes of shin splints are:

  1. Muscle imbalance in the glutes or the thighs
  2. Anatomical deformity such as flat foot
  3. Not using proper form during training
  4. Lack of flexibility
  5. If you wear improper shoes during workouts, then it may lead to shin problems
  6. Running downhill may lead to excessive stress on the shin leading to shin splints

Symptoms:

The symptoms of shin splints are: 

  1. You may experience swelling in the lower leg
  2. A dull pain in the front portion of the leg
  3. Tenderness around the shin area
  4. Numbness around the shin area
  5. Inflammation in the shin area
  6. You may experience severe pain while walking

Treatment: The basic treatment for shin splints is the RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation) protocol. It means allowing the leg to rest, applying ice packs and wearing compression bandages. It is recommended to take rest and not exert the leg beyond a certain point to limit the damage. The complications that may result from shin splints are compartment syndrome, where there is buildup of pressure in the muscle. In some cases, where the muscle tears off from the bone, a surgery may be required to treat this condition. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

2692 people found this helpful

Shin Splint Pain - Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Dr. Ritesh Kharnal 87% (601 ratings)
MSPT (Master of Physical Therapy)
Physiotherapist, Indore
Shin splints refer to pain felt anywhere along the shinbone from knee to ankle.It is a common overuse injury that most runners will deal with and dread. It is an inflammatory condition of the front part of the tibia. Pain felt on the inner side of the shinbone is called ‘medial shin splints’, while the term ‘anterior shin splints’ refers to pain felt on the outer side. While medial shin splints are more common, pain may be felt on both sides of the shinbone in severe cases.
The common term ‘shinbone’ suggests there is only one bone in the lower leg. Actually, there are two: the fibula and the tibia. The muscles of the fibula attach to the ankle and help to move the foot. The muscles on the outer side of the tibia extend over the top of the foot and help to lift the foot & uncurl the toes.
Causes of Shin Splints
Shin splits commonly occur due to overuse or over-activity. It usually occurs when a person has started running after a long period. Running on hard surfaces or wearing of inadequate and poorly shoes is also one of the major causes of shin splints. Other then this being overweight, lack of calcium or any previous injury can also be reasons of pain in lower leg.
Signs & Symptoms of Shin Splints
The patient has a dull, aching pain in the front part of the lower leg. For some, the pain and discomfort emerge only during exercise, while for others it comes after the physical activity is over. Pain can also be there all the time. The pain can be on either side of the shinbone, or in the muscle itself - this depends on the cause. Signs and symptoms related to shin splints may include:
Moderate swelling in lower leg
Tenderness or soreness along the inner part of the lower leg
Feet may feel numb and weak, because swollen muscles irritate the nerves
Pain triggers when the toes and foot are bent downwards
In severe cases,pain can also be felt while climbing stairs
Stress fractures of one of the two bones in the leg below the knee can also cause shin splint-type pain. A stress fracture is a type of incomplete fracture in a bone. Stress fractures tend to occur as a result of overuse and are known as overuse injuries.
Diagnosis of Shin Splits
Shin splints are usually fairly easy to diagnose. The doctor carries out a physical exam, checks the patient's medical history, and may ask relevant questions regarding lifestyle and physical activities.Sometimes, the doctor may order some diagnostic tests in order to rule out other possible causes, such as a stress fracture. The tests you may have are listed below
MRI scan- This uses magnets and radiowaves to produce images of your shin bone and surrounding soft tissues. Because MRI scans are the most accurate and don’t expose you to radiation, this is usually the test of choice.
X-ray- This is a test that uses radiation to produce an image of the inside of your body.
CT scan - This uses X-rays to make a three-dimensional image of your shin bone. You’re exposed to more radiation than a simple X-ray when you have this test.
Bone scan - This looks for abnormalities or changes in your bones.
Treatment of Shin Splints
Self-help
Following are things you can do yourself to treat shin splints
Avoid doing activities that causes pain,swelling or discomfort. It is better to do low-impact exercises like bicycling, swimming instead of completely avoiding it. But if you have stress fracture it is recommended to take rest for few weeks and heal properly.
Try cold ice packs to help relieve any pain. Wrap your ice pack in a towel – don’t apply it directly onto your skin. Hold it in place for 10 to 20 minutes at a time. You can repeat this several times a day if you need to.
You can take over-the-counter painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen to reduce pain.
Check your sport shoes to make sure they are giving your feet enough support and cushioning. Orthotic insoles for your shoes may also help to improve the way you run.
When you start exercising again, start slowly. If you get shin splints again, stop the activity and rest for a few days before starting the exercise at a lower level of intensity.
Run on soft surfaces like grass
Non-surgical treatment
Your physiotherapist can develop a training programme for you to gradually increase your level of activity and help you return to your usual sports. They may use a range of different treatments to help your recovery, including massage and stretching exercises.
Surgery
Most of the time, surgery isn’t required for shin splints. However, if your shin splints are caused by compartment syndrome and your pain is severe, your doctor may suggest an operation called a fasciotomy. This releases the pressure on the muscles in your lower leg.
Prevention of Shin Splints
Risk of developing shin splints can be reduce by doing the following
Wear shoes with good support and padding
Wear cushioned insoles to absorb some of the impact while doing any sport activity
Warm up before working out
Stretch the muscles in your legs after workouts
Work to maintain and improve strength in muscles
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