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Post Exposure Prophylaxis for Hiv Health Feed

How Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Can Help With HIV?

Dr.Vikram Jeet Singh 83% (34ratings)
MD - Physician, PG Diploma Diabetes, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
General Physician, Delhi
How Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Can Help With HIV?

When you are potentially exposed to HIV, and if there is a way to prevent from getting infected, you will seek to perform it. One such procedure is Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) which must be initiated within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV.

What is PEP meant for?
The Human immune deficiency virus causes HIV infection that affects the immune system and is considered to be one of the deadly forms of infections. This virus spreads through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids and breast milk. There are chances of encountering the infection under the circumstances such as having sexual intercourse or sharing needles with an infected person by accident. In such a case, PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis) can come to your aid in preventing the infection.

The medical term PEP refers to the intake of ARV or antiretroviral medicines after being exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus. To be more specific, PEP is a short-term antiretroviral treatment that works towards reducing the symptoms and likelihood of the HIV infection after being exposed to it.

Who should opt for PEP treatment?
PEP can be ideal for everyone who comes in contact with the HIV and is an HIV negative. Whether one is exposed to HIV through a needle stick injury during his/her work as a health care professional, or whether it’s unprotected sex that has exposed one to HIV, or the sharing of used needles or through sexual assault, opting for the PEP can be the next best step as it is particularly meant for emergency situations.

When and how long PEP can be taken?

As per the research, PEP should be taken within 3 days or 72 hours from the possible time of being exposed to HIV. If taken after 72 hours, the PEP most likely cannot help in preventing the HIV infection, hence the sooner, the better in this case. The course of PEP involves 3 ARV or more per day for almost 28 days. Along with taking the ARV medications, one must visit his/her health care professional at certain intervals for HIV testing and other related tests.

Are there any side-effects of taking PEP?
When opting for PEP treatment, some people may experience a few side effects due to it, which varies from person to person, such as vomiting, nausea, headaches, diarrhea, fatigue, etc. However, none of the side effects are life-threatening and can be easily treated. Often, it is due to the reaction of the PEP medications with other drugs that one is taking at the same time that the side-effects start showing. Moreover, as PEP can potentially prevent HIV infection, this benefit certainly outweighs the inconvenience caused as side effects.

PEP is considered to be one of the most effective and promising treatments available for preventing HIV infection if taken correctly and within the certain time duration. In case one thinks he or she has been exposed to HIV somehow, talking to a health care professional regarding PEP becomes crucial.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2978 people found this helpful

Post Exposure Prophylaxis - To Avoid HIV!

Dr.Ketan Ranpariya 97% (5486ratings)
MBBS, PG Diploma (HIV Medicines)
HIV Specialist, Surat
Post Exposure Prophylaxis - To Avoid HIV!

#PEP Post Exposure Prophylaxis

कंडोम के बिना सेक्स के 72 घंटे के अंदर  पीईपी दवा एचआईवी संक्रमण को रोकने में सहायक है

Withing 72 hours of condomless sex, PEP medicine helpful to prevent HIV infection

કોન્ડોમ વગરના શારિરીક સંબંધના 72 કલાકમાં પી.ઈ.પી દવા લેવાથી એચ.આઈ.વી થતો અટકાવી શકાય છે.

2 people found this helpful

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) - How It Can Help With HIV?

Dr.R.Pavan Kumar 89% (40ratings)
MBBS, PGDHS,PGDHIVM
General Physician, Nalgonda
Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) - How It Can Help With HIV?

When you are potentially exposed to HIV, and if there is a way to prevent from getting infected, you will seek to perform it. One such procedure is Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) which must be initiated within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV.

What is PEP meant for?
The Human immune deficiency virus causes HIV infection that affects the immune system and is considered to be one of the deadly forms of infections. This virus spreads through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids and breast milk. There are chances of encountering the infection under the circumstances such as having sexual intercourse or sharing needles with an infected person by accident. In such a case, PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis) can come to your aid in preventing the infection.

The medical term PEP refers to the intake of ARV or antiretroviral medicines after being exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus. To be more specific, PEP is a short-term antiretroviral treatment that works towards reducing the symptoms and likelihood of the HIV infection after being exposed to it.

Who should opt for PEP treatment?
PEP can be ideal for everyone who comes in contact with the HIV and is an HIV negative. Whether one is exposed to HIV through a needle stick injury during his/her work as a health care professional, or whether it’s unprotected sex that has exposed one to HIV, or the sharing of used needles or through sexual assault, opting for the PEP can be the next best step as it is particularly meant for emergency situations.

When and how long PEP can be taken?

As per the research, PEP should be taken within 3 days or 72 hours from the possible time of being exposed to HIV. If taken after 72 hours, the PEP most likely cannot help in preventing the HIV infection, hence the sooner, the better in this case. The course of PEP involves 3 ARV or more per day for almost 28 days. Along with taking the ARV medications, one must visit his/her health care professional at certain intervals for HIV testing and other related tests.

Are there any side-effects of taking PEP?
When opting for PEP treatment, some people may experience a few side effects due to it, which varies from person to person, such as vomiting, nausea, headaches, diarrhea, fatigue, etc. However, none of the side effects are life-threatening and can be easily treated. Often, it is due to the reaction of the PEP medications with other drugs that one is taking at the same time that the side-effects start showing. Moreover, as PEP can potentially prevent HIV infection, this benefit certainly outweighs the inconvenience caused as side effects.

PEP is considered to be one of the most effective and promising treatments available for preventing HIV infection if taken correctly and within the certain time duration. In case one thinks he or she has been exposed to HIV somehow, talking to a health care professional regarding PEP becomes crucial. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a General Physician.

3085 people found this helpful

PreP - Pre Exposure Prophylaxis Know More About It!

Dr.Ketan Ranpariya 97% (5486ratings)
MBBS, PG Diploma (HIV Medicines)
HIV Specialist, Surat
PreP - Pre Exposure Prophylaxis Know More About It!

#PreP Pre Exposure Prophylaxis

नियमित रूप से PrEP दवा से HIV को रोका जा सकता है

By regular PrEP medicine, HIV can be prevented

નિયમિત પ્રેપ દવા લેવાથી એચ.આઈ.વીનો ચેપ થતો અટકાવી શકાય છે

1 person found this helpful

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) - Who Should Go For This Treatment In HIV?

MBBS, MD - Dermatology
HIV Specialist, Mumbai
Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) - Who Should Go For This Treatment In HIV?

When you are potentially exposed to HIV, and if there is a way to prevent from getting infected, you will seek to perform it. One such procedure is Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) which must be initiated within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV.

What is PEP meant for?
The Human immune deficiency virus causes HIV infection that affects the immune system and is considered to be one of the deadly forms of infections. This virus spreads through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids and breast milk. There are chances of encountering the infection under the circumstances such as having sexual intercourse or sharing needles with an infected person by accident. In such a case, PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis) can come to your aid in preventing the infection.

The medical term PEP refers to the intake of ARV or antiretroviral medicines after being exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus. To be more specific, PEP is a short-term antiretroviral treatment that works towards reducing the symptoms and likelihood of the HIV infection after being exposed to it.

Who should opt for PEP treatment?
PEP can be ideal for everyone who comes in contact with the HIV and is an HIV negative. Whether one is exposed to HIV through a needle stick injury during his/her work as a health care professional, or whether it’s unprotected sex that has exposed one to HIV, or the sharing of used needles or through sexual assault, opting for the PEP can be the next best step as it is particularly meant for emergency situations.

When and how long PEP can be taken?
As per the research, PEP should be taken within 3 days or 72 hours from the possible time of being exposed to HIV. If taken after 72 hours, the PEP most likely cannot help in preventing the HIV infection, hence the sooner, the better in this case. The course of PEP involves 3 ARV or more per day for almost 28 days. Along with taking the ARV medications, one must visit his/her health care professional at certain intervals for HIV testing and other related tests.

Are there any side-effects of taking PEP?
When opting for PEP treatment, some people may experience a few side effects due to it, which varies from person to person, such as vomiting, nausea, headaches, diarrhea, fatigue, etc. However, none of the side effects are life-threatening and can be easily treated. Often, it is due to the reaction of the PEP medications with other drugs that one is taking at the same time that the side-effects start showing. Moreover, as PEP can potentially prevent HIV infection, this benefit certainly outweighs the inconvenience caused as side effects.

PEP is considered to be one of the most effective and promising treatments available for preventing HIV infection if taken correctly and within the certain time duration. In case one thinks he or she has been exposed to HIV somehow, talking to a health care professional regarding PEP becomes crucial.

2967 people found this helpful

Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) And Use Of Condom!

Dr.Ketan Ranpariya 97% (5486ratings)
MBBS, PG Diploma (HIV Medicines)
HIV Specialist, Surat
Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) And Use Of Condom!

नियमित रूप से PrEP दवा से HIV को रोका जा सकता है

By regular PrEP medicine, HIV can be prevented

નિયમિત પ્રેપ દવા લેવાથી એચ.આઈ.વીનો ચેપ થતો અટકાવી શકાય છે

I did sex with hiv positive person on dtd 30.07.2017. How long after a possible exposure should I be tested for HIV. Can I cooked Post Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV and how to get this medication.

Dr.Ishwar Gilada 94% (3762ratings)
MBBS, DDV, FCPS, APEX, Diplomat American Board of Sexology
HIV Specialist, Mumbai
I did sex with hiv positive person on dtd 30.07.2017. How long after a possible exposure should I be tested for HIV. ...
Post Exposure Prophylaxis PEP, should be started within 8 to 24 hours and latest before 48 hours after sexual exposure. It will not work now and do not waste money on it. 2) Do HIV PCR after 2 weeks, but it is expensive. 3) If not do HIV test after 3 months. You will need personal consultation and some tests.
9 people found this helpful
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What Is Post-exposure Prophylaxis?

Dr.Vinod Raina 91% (6481ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
What Is Post-exposure Prophylaxis?

What is post-exposure prophylaxis?

With PEP, an HIV-negative person who may have been exposed to HIV takes anti-HIV drugs prescribed by a doctor to prevent infection. These are the same drugs that people living with HIV take. PEP involves taking two or three of these drugs for a period of one month. To effectively reduce a person’s risk of becoming HIV-positive, PEP must be taken within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV but ideally as early as possible.  

In the world of PEP, exposure to HIV is often divided into two categories: occupational exposure and non-occupational exposure. “Occupational” exposure refers to exposure to HIV at work, in a healthcare setting. For example, a healthcare provider could be exposed to HIV through a needlestick injury at work. “Non-occupational” exposure refers to exposure to HIV through sex or drug use, for example, when a person shares a needle or has sex without a condom.

What is the rationale for PEP?

In the first one to three days following exposure to HIV, there is a ‘window of opportunity’ when taking PEP might prevent an HIV infection from occurring.1 During this ‘window of opportunity,’ the virus is busy infecting cells at the site of exposure (such as in the anus, penis or vagina). Once the virus is inside a cell, it starts replicating to produce more HIV (also known as virions). After a few days, these new HIV virions start to spread throughout the body; once this happens, infection is permanent. The theory is that if PEP is given to a person early enough, it can stop the virus from replicating at the initial site of exposure, preventing virions from spreading throughout the body – stopping the infection from becoming permanent. The cells that initially became infected would eventually die out and the virus would not be able to replicate.   

What is the evidence on PEP?

There is some evidence that suggests that providing PEP after a potential exposure to HIV can help reduce a person’s risk of HIV infection. However, we also know that PEP is not 100% effective, meaning that it will not prevent all HIV infections.

Learn more about the evidence on PEP

What does someone need to know to access PEP?

People at risk need to know that PEP exists. If people are unaware of PEP, they won’t know that PEP is an option in the event of a high-risk behaviour that could result in being exposed to HIV. Very little research has been done to determine how many people are aware of PEP; however, based on the research that has been done, it seems that only a small proportion of gay and heterosexual men and women, even in cities with well-established PEP programs, are aware of PEP.9,10,11,12

People at risk need to know that time is of the essence. The later someone starts PEP, the less likely it is to prevent HIV infection. The best time to start PEP is immediately after exposure. However, PEP has some ability to prevent HIV infection up to 72 hours after infection.

People at risk need to know where to go. PEP must be prescribed by a doctor. Since time is of the essence, people need to be able to access services that are always open, such as emergency rooms. As a service provider, it may be important for you to know if there is a physician or healthcare facility in your area willing to prescribe PEP. If there isn’t, perhaps your organization can inform local clinicians of PEP and push for access to PEP for your clients.

Anyone accessing PEP will be tested for HIV. PEP is used to prevent HIV, not to treat it. People who go to a healthcare facility for PEP will be tested for HIV. They will still be prescribed PEP while the test results are pending; however, if the result is positive, PEP may either be discontinued or the anti-HIV drugs may be changed to HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) to treat the person’s HIV infection.

PEP can be costly and it may have to be paid for out of pocket. The cost of a full course of PEP is approximately $1100 to $1500. PEP may be covered by some private insurance plans and some public health insurance plans, depending on the province and the nature of the exposure. However, many at-risk individuals may not have access to any drug coverage and may not be able to afford it. There may be a need for advocacy in your area or province to fight for universal access to PEP.  

People on PEP may experience side effects. Depending on the anti-HIV drugs prescribed, people may experience side effects from PEP, such as fatigue, nausea or diarrhea. This can cause people to stop taking their PEP drugs as prescribed, which can decrease the ability of the medications to prevent HIV infection and increase the likelihood of being infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV.

People on PEP have to be monitored by a doctor. Testing for toxicity will be required to make sure the drugs are not causing harm to the body. The type of tests may differ depending on the anti-HIV drugs that are prescribed but would likely include liver and kidney tests.

PEP can fail to prevent HIV infection if someone doesn’t take the anti-HIV drugs as prescribed. Taking the anti-HIV drugs exactly as prescribed (also known as adherence) is central to the success of PEP. If someone doesn’t take their PEP as prescribed, then HIV infection could occur. There are two issues with adherence:

Some people might start PEP but stop using it early (before the four weeks are over). In research studies 24% to 78% of people who started PEP stopped taking it early.13
Some people may not take their PEP exactly as prescribed. For example, some people may occasionally forget doses, or take only every second dose.  
Drug resistance can develop if a person doesn’t take the anti-HIV drugs as prescribed. If a person becomes HIV-positive due to non-adherence, they may develop drug resistance. When someone does not take PEP as prescribed, the amount of anti-HIV drugs in the blood can be too low to suppress the HIV, which can allow the virus to evolve and develop resistance. It is important to understand that infection with a drug-resistant strain of HIV limits a person’s future treatment options. If a person with a drug-resistant strain of HIV subsequently infects someone else with HIV, drug resistance spreads within the community.

Community agencies can provide adherence support for people on PEP by providing ongoing consultation and encouragement to help people take PEP exactly as prescribed and to complete their treatment.

PEP may fail to prevent HIV infection due to drug resistance. If a person is exposed to a drug-resistant strain of HIV and the person is prescribed the drug they are resistant to, as part of their PEP regime, then PEP may fail to prevent HIV infection. Unfortunately, there is no way to know within the first one to three days if someone has been exposed to drug-resistant HIV.
 

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis - How It Can Help You?

Dr.R.Pavan Kumar 89% (40ratings)
MBBS, PGDHS,PGDHIVM
General Physician, Nalgonda
Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis - How It Can Help You?

Pre-exposure prophylaxis is a treatment method for people who do not have the HIV infection but who might be facing a considerable risk of contacting the disease. It is done by taking one pill daily. The pill comprises of two medicines i.e. tenofovir and emtricitabine. These two are combined with other drugs in order to treat HIV. When a person is exposed to HIV, be it through sexual intercourse or shared needles, these drugs help in stopping the infection from reaching an advanced stage.

Dosage and use
When the drug is consumed on a regular basis, pre-exposure prophylaxis has been observed to decrease the risk of HIV infection in individuals with increased risk by up to 92%. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is not as effective when not taken on a consistent basis.

Advantages

  1. It can actually help patients: While many still consider it to be a farce, pre-exposure prophylaxis has been proven to reduce the risk of HIV infection transmitted from unprotected sex. Recording a success rate of over 90% in that field, Pre-exposure prophylaxis has been proven to show a success rate of 70% in people who inject drugs in their body. These results could be a reflection of individuals on being consistent in this treatment method. For people who are forced to limited possibilities to protect themselves from the HIV virus, pre-exposure prophylaxis permits them to control their risk of contacting HIV.
  2. Affordable: The PrEP drug costs are lesser than HIV treatment when analyzed at both per-dose and duration of use levels. Furthermore, PrEP is prescribed on a consistent basis, only when an individual is facing a heightened risk of HIV. But if an individual contracts HIV, they will be required to be a part of the Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) process for the rest of their lives in order to stay in good physical shape. A PrEP program is projected to cost less than 5% of an average HIV program’s entire budget.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

 

3370 people found this helpful

I had unsafe sex insertive with unknown hiv status, and started post exposure prophylaxis after 68 hr of exposure. Kindly guide me further.

Dr.Prakhar Singh 95% (7873ratings)
MBBS, Basic Life Support (B.L.S), Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE)
General Physician, Delhi
I had unsafe sex insertive with unknown hiv status, and started post exposure prophylaxis after 68 hr of exposure. Ki...
Now a days hiv tests are more accurate and should be conclusive especially after 80 days of exposure. If it is negative it means you are hiv negative. Let's have a detailed discussion for better advice and healthy lifestyle.
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