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Osteopenia Tips

Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Know More About It!

Dr. Rakesh Kumar 92% (130 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Know More About It!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
2538 people found this helpful

How Low Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Can Cause Osteopenia?

Dr. Hanume Gowda S N 85% (10 ratings)
DNB - Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Fellowship In Joint Replacement
Orthopedist, Bangalore
How Low Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Can Cause  Osteopenia?

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
3592 people found this helpful

Understanding The Risk Factors Of Osteopenia & Osteoporosis!

Dr. Mukesh Kumar Agarwal 88% (20 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, DNB (Orthopedics)
Orthopedist, Guwahati
Understanding The Risk Factors Of Osteopenia & Osteoporosis!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4495 people found this helpful

Risk Factor for Osteopenia or Osteoporosis!

Dr. Shobhit Tandon 89% (822 ratings)
MBBS, PG-Diploma In Clinical Pathology
General Physician, Sri Ganganagar
Risk Factor for Osteopenia or Osteoporosis!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
3209 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Tips To Prevent Bone Loss!

Dr. Shekhar Srivastav 83% (12 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Tips To Prevent Bone Loss!

Did you know that osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures worldwide every year? What is frightening is many  of these fractures are now taking place among the youth due to deficit  diet and poor lifestyle coupled with genetic predisposition. Both osteoporosis and osteopenia are two forms of bone loss conditions, with the latter being a precursor to the former. To distinguish between the two a bone mineral density test is usually performed.

What is difference between Osteoporosis and Osteopenia?

A BMD (bone mineral density) T-score between -1 SD and -2.5 SD indicates osteopenia with a high chance of osteoporosis. On the other hand, a T-score of -2.5 SD and below stands for osteoporosis. A higher bone density (above -1SD) is usually indicative of stronger bones. Fragility index is more accurate way to assess risk of fractures.

In osteoporosis the bone loss or weakening of bones take place over a long period of time, and results in unexpected fractures and severe bone problems. Disfigurement, fractures in the spine, loss of mobility and independence are usual characteristics of this bone disease once it progresses further.

Prevention is better than cure, ALWAYS!

To keep bones strong and healthy, calcium and phosphate is continuously absorbed by the body. But after 30, the body’s ability to absorb calcium slows down and there’s a decrease in the production of new bones. In contrast, bone desorption (the process of transferring calcium from the bone to the blood) continues unabated.

When the body starts absorbing the store of calcium in the bones to meets its needs, it leads to calcium depletion and is one of the causes of weakening of the bone.

At present, the age limit (50-60 years) for osteoporosis has seen a drop with many younger people increasingly suffering from the ailment. Factors like unhealthy lifestyle, late-night shifts, smoking and alcohol consumption have been found to be the culprits behind the rise in osteoporosis cases among the young.  Recent studies have identified vitamin D deficiency as a major factor for poor bone health and bone mass density in the young.

How to keep your bones strong and healthy? And manage Osteo - penia/porosis complications:

Bone loss can be prevented by adopting these very simple but effective ways:

- Exercising can help in building strong bones and muscles, while preventing bone loss.

- Maintaining a calcium intake of 1000 mg for pre-menopausal women and 1200 mg for women post menopause.

- Staying out in the sun for 20 minutes to produce requisite amount of Vitamin D for calcium absorption and using supplements of vitamin D.

- There are many safe medicines available to prevent and treat osteoporosis like alendronates, calcitonin, Parathyroid , teriparatide preparation etc.

- In osteoporosis induced /associated fractures we have to to modify implants to negate weak purchase of implants in bone and improve mobility.

We have been using these modifications in established osteopenia/porosis case in fractures treatment/joint replacement/ arthroscopic fixations and MIS spine fracture management.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3997 people found this helpful

Osteopenia - 6 Signs You Are Suffering From It!

Dr. Rakesh G. Nair Nair 90% (17 ratings)
DNB (Orthopedics), Diploma in Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Mumbai
Osteopenia - 6 Signs You Are Suffering From It!

We may be lost in progression and may have a lot to achieve in life, there may be things that we just cannot let go off, such as success and in such a rush for advancement and success we may be overlooking health in the bargain. Though we may not realize it, but as age progresses, the health takes a toll and the disease fighting and sustenance abilities of the body also start to decline. One of the most common problems that a lot of people go through is the weakening of the bones.

There may be instances, particularly in women, where they may feel fatigued and tired and this is something that most women may ignore so that they may be able to concentrate on the other aspects of life. However, more than often, the problems that the women face are known to be symptoms of health issues such as Osteopenia. Osteopenia is a problem of the bones where they gradually lose their natural ability to make sufficient amount of calcium necessary for the health and safety of the bone structure and when the problem takes a sever turn it may lead to osteoporosis.

Knowing the symptoms:
The problem of osteopenia may not have obvious symptoms in the beginning but people who suffer from the problem may complain of the following issues:

  1. A lot of people may experience lower back pain when they are suffering from osteopenia.
  2. The back pain may also arise from the hunching of the back which is another symptom of the health issue.
  3. There have been instances of patients suffering from lowering of the height when they are suffering from the bone related issue.
  4. The fracturing of bones becomes more likely for people who suffer from the problem.
  5. Lots of people may also end up losing teeth due to the issue.
  6. One of the biggest symptoms is that the patients of osteopenia usually also develop osteoporosis in the advanced stages of the issue.

Treating Osteopenia:
Though there is no confirmed cure for the issue, it is possible to be able to control the problem and limit its ill-effects or symptoms. With a revision of dietary habits to include foods that help in the increase of calcium you may be able to control the problem to a great extent. It may also be possible to keep the issue under check by following healthy lifestyle habits such as quitting smoking or following regular exercise routines or taking the right treatment or medications as suggested by a specialist. Sometimes a disease can be a result of an underlying illness that you are unaware of, which is why self-diagnosis or treatment may not be advised and it is always wiser to take help from your physician. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Orthopedist.

4430 people found this helpful

Common Injuries Faced By Athletes

Dr. Nithin Kumar Bejjanki 91% (122 ratings)
Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS), Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS), MBBS, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE)
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
Common Injuries Faced By Athletes

When athletes begin training for sports and events and put themselves under the pre-requisite training for such an event, they might experience pain as a result of bone mass increase in areas of maximum stress. If however, the training and exertion is too rapid, the bone might begin to fail and the stress reaction might cause the bone to pain and eventually it can cause fracture in extreme cases.

The athlete will experience unbearable pain at night before such a stress fracture happens. An X-ray is needed to determine, if such a stress fracture has developed and the extent of the fracture. Prior to the fracture, the areas affected will develop black or blue bruising.

Hip bone is often the site of injury and many different factors may cause trauma to it. Stress fractures are caused by prolonged and repetitive injury and are common in long distance running athletes. Hip impingement might result from abnormally shaped hip bones wherein the bones grind against each other and deteriorate the connecting joint. The iliac crest (present in the greater pelvic part) of the hip bone impacting the muscle overhead, can lead to hip pointer injuries.

  1. Osgood Schlatter Disease is a condition affecting children, mostly boys who participate in athletics, due to overuse of muscles. The patellar tendon and surrounding tissues get inflamed and with proper rest, ice compression, and elevation of the knee, it can be treated.
  2. Premature osteoporosis is a condition that affects female athletes in particular due to low calcium levels and menstrual dysfunction which hamper the body’s bone building process.
  3. Over training in male athletes may lead to osteoporosis due to reduced testosterone levels.
  4. Osteopenia or the loss of bone in athletes may result due to over training and psychological stress. The calcium is mainly reabsorbed from the ‘cancellous bone’ (bone tissue that has a structure similar to a mesh, containing many pores) in the femur.
  5. Most athletes suffer from low bone density and in extreme cases, this might lead to osteopenia. Cyclists are found to have the highest loss of bone density amongst athletes. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Orthopedist.
4672 people found this helpful

Risk Factors Of Osteopenia!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Spine and Pain Specialist, Delhi
Risk Factors Of Osteopenia!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Orthopaedist.
3368 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Know The Difference!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Chennai
Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Know The Difference!

Did you know that osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures worldwide every year? What is frightening is many  of these fractures are now taking place among the youth due to deficit  diet and poor lifestyle coupled with genetic predisposition. Both osteoporosis and osteopenia are two forms of bone loss conditions, with the latter being a precursor to the former. To distinguish between the two a bone mineral density test is usually performed.

What is difference between Osteoporosis and Osteopenia?

A BMD (bone mineral density) T-score between -1 SD and -2.5 SD indicates osteopenia with a high chance of osteoporosis. On the other hand, a T-score of -2.5 SD and below stands for osteoporosis. A higher bone density (above -1SD) is usually indicative of stronger bones. Fragility index is more accurate way to assess risk of fractures.

In osteoporosis the bone loss or weakening of bones take place over a long period of time, and results in unexpected fractures and severe bone problems. Disfigurement, fractures in the spine, loss of mobility and independence are usual characteristics of this bone disease once it progresses further.

Prevention is better than cure, ALWAYS!

To keep bones strong and healthy, calcium and phosphate is continuously absorbed by the body. But after 30, the body’s ability to absorb calcium slows down and there’s a decrease in the production of new bones. In contrast, bone desorption (the process of transferring calcium from the bone to the blood) continues unabated.

When the body starts absorbing the store of calcium in the bones to meets its needs, it leads to calcium depletion and is one of the causes of weakening of the bone.

At present, the age limit (50-60 years) for osteoporosis has seen a drop with many younger people increasingly suffering from the ailment. Factors like unhealthy lifestyle, late-night shifts, smoking and alcohol consumption have been found to be the culprits behind the rise in osteoporosis cases among the young.  Recent studies have identified vitamin D deficiency as a major factor for poor bone health and bone mass density in the young.

How to keep your bones strong and healthy? And manage Osteo - penia/porosis complications:

Bone loss can be prevented by adopting these very simple but effective ways:

- Exercising can help in building strong bones and muscles, while preventing bone loss.

- Maintaining a calcium intake of 1000 mg for pre-menopausal women and 1200 mg for women post menopause.

- Staying out in the sun for 20 minutes to produce requisite amount of Vitamin D for calcium absorption and using supplements of vitamin D.

- There are many safe medicines available to prevent and treat osteoporosis like alendronates, calcitonin, Parathyroid, teriparatide preparation etc.

- In osteoporosis induced /associated fractures we have to to modify implants to negate weak purchase of implants in bone and improve mobility.

We have been using these modifications in established osteopenia/porosis case in fractures treatment/joint replacement/ arthroscopic fixations and MIS spine fracture management. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

4245 people found this helpful

Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Are You At Risk?

Dr. Sachin Singh 92% (354 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Ozone Therapy
Orthopedist, Ghaziabad
Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Are You At Risk?

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a rheumatologist.
2432 people found this helpful
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