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Osteoarthritis of the Knee Tips

Unicondylar Knee Replacement - Who Can Opt It?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Ahmedabad
Unicondylar Knee Replacement - Who Can Opt It?

Knee problems can be quite annoying but if this problem becomes regular, it brings life to a standstill. The movement becomes restricted. Many associated problems slowly crop up. Thus, it is best to nip the problem in the bud. While some people might experience a problem in the full knee, in some people, only a single compartment (tissue or cartilage) of the knee may be affected. For such patients, Unicondylar Knee Replacement comes as a blessing.

Unicondylar knee replacement, also known as the Unicompartmental Knee Replacement or Partial Knee Replacement is the most sought-after knee replacement surgery. The surgery involves replacing only the worn out or affected part (cartilage) of the knee, thereby preserving the healthier cartilages and tissues of the knee.

In the last few years, incidences of osteoarthritis have been on the rise. The unicondylar knee replacement surgery has made life a lot easier for people suffering from osteoarthritis (a condition where the articular cartilage or the connective tissue present within the knee joint begins to wear out).

Unicondylar knee replacement is ideal for people facing problem with:

  • Severe osteoarthritis (Median or Lateral) that results in the painful, swollen, and stiffened knee.
  • Only a small portion of the knee is affected.
  • A person experiences great difficulty in movement.
  • People over 48 years of age are mostly advised to undergo this surgery. Many young people with osteoarthritis opt for this surgery.

However, the surgery may not be a wise idea for

  • A person with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Angular Deformity (acute).
  • A person whose larger portion of the knee is affected.
  • A person who had undergone osteotomy (surgical excision followed by reshaping of bones).
  • People with an unstable or weak knee should avoid this surgery.

Pre- surgery, a person should

  • Avoid taking any anti-inflammatory and herbal medicines (minimum 10 days before the surgery).
  • Get yourself medically examined for any health complications (that might interfere with surgery).
  • Follow a healthy lifestyle. Avoid smoking and drinking.

Procedure of Unicondylar Knee Replacement:

  • For the surgery, the patient is either given general anesthesia or a spinal (or epidural) one.
  • Next, a compressing device (tourniquet) is put around the upper part of the thigh. This is done to avoid excessive blood loss during the surgery.
  • A 7cm incision is made over the knee.
  • The damaged parts (bones and cartilages) of the knee are then carefully removed.
  • The surgeon next replaces the excised parts with metallic implants. Once the metallic part fits into the knee, it is adhered to the bone with (or without) bone cement.
  • The surgeon then stitches the incised area, followed by dressing and bandage.

Unicondylar knee replacement recovery time is quick, between 3-4 weeks. However, the concerned person may require physiotherapy for the next 3-6 months.

Advantages of Unicondylar Knee Replacement:

  • The surgery is less invasive with a quick recovery time.
  • The surgery replaces only the affected knee part.
  • Blood transfusions are seldom required.
  • A person gets back to normal life faster.
  • The surgery requires less time (~ 1-2 hours).

You need to be careful about:

  • Infection at the incision site, though it is very rare.
  • Injury in blood vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
  • Fracture in the bone

Update From Lybrate: After a particular age, everyone suffers from bone or joint issues. To keep these problems at bay, Buy Bones & Joint Care products from Lybrate.

2059 people found this helpful

All You Must Know About Osteoarthritis!

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DNB - Rheumatology, Fellowship In Rheumatology
Rheumatologist, Delhi
All You Must Know About Osteoarthritis!

There are so many things we take for granted. For example, have you ever thought about how your fingers bend or how your knees open and fold to help you walk? It is only when these simple acts start becoming uncomfortable that we take a closer look at them. Osteoarthritis is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects the cartilage in our joints. As the cartilage breaks down, bones lose the buffer between them and every movement becomes stiff and painful.

Here are a few things you should know about osteoarthritis.

  1. Osteoarthritis is common: Osteoarthritis can affect both men and women but men have a higher risk of osteoarthritis as compared to women. This risk increases with age. Other risk factors associated with osteoarthritis include obesity, genetics, muscle weakness and previous joint injuries. The joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis include the knees, hips, and spine. It is important to note that though this condition is common, it is not inevitable.
     
  2. You can reduce your risk of Osteoarthritis: By making a few lifestyle changes you can reduce the chances of suffering from this condition. Controlling your blood sugar and weight are primary amongst these. Regular exercise is also necessary as it increases flexibility and keeps the joints supple. It also strengthens the bones and muscles. If your work involves heavy lifting avoid placing stress on your knees and instead lift the weight with your hips.
     
  3. Different people have different symptoms: This condition has a very slow progression rate and hence may go unnoticed in its early stages. While some people experience pain in the early stages, others may not realize anything is amiss until an X-ray shows the degenerated cartilage. It also progresses at different rates for each individual. The condition will progress faster in the case of people living with heavy stress or those with a sedentary lifestyle. Some of the common symptoms associated with osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, and swelling of the joints. Along with an X-ray, blood tests will also be conducted to diagnose osteoarthritis. This helps rule out any other type of arthritis. In rare cases, osteoarthritis can cause joint deformities.
     
  4. Exercise is the best treatment for osteoarthritis: At present, there is no known cure for this disease. Medication can help relieve the pain caused by movement but cannot help stop the cartilage degeneration or help new cartilage grow. However, exercise can be very beneficial. This helps strengthen the muscles around the joint and can even slow down the rate of degeneration. Low-intensity exercises such as walking, swimming, yoga, and cycling are ideal for osteoarthritis patients as they do not put any pressure on the joints.
1304 people found this helpful

Osteoarthritis - 5 Effective Ways To Keep It At Bay!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, DNB ORTHO, fellowship Arthroplasty MUHS
Orthopedic Doctor, Mumbai
Osteoarthritis - 5 Effective Ways To Keep It At Bay!

Osteoarthritis is among the most common ailments that people on the other side of 50 are affected with. Few of the primary reasons behind osteoarthritis are age, obesity and weakened bones. Sometimes, osteoarthritis stems from joint injury or some sort of stress on the bones. It leads to acute pain and stiffness and can only be cured through medication and exercise. The symptoms may vary from mild creakiness in the joints and swelling to the loss of cartilages between bones.

Long periods of inactivity can also trigger extreme stiffness as well. While it is an extremely painful disease, it does not spread to the other parts of the body. Inflammation of various degrees in the ligaments and joints is the primary cause of osteoarthritis and sustained treatment can only result in abating of pain. Osteoarthritis is usually treated through detecting the symptoms and through other imaging tests, while joint replacement may be a viable solution, there are other non-surgical processes that reap fruitful results while battling osteoarthritis.

It usually involves an optimum mixture of exercises and drug therapy. While there are several cures available, prevention should always be a priority:

  1. Physical activity: Obesity is one of the primary causes of osteoarthritis. Certain prescribed exercises can go a long way in improving muscle strength and reducing joint pains. However, excessive exercises must be avoided. Other preventive methods include medicinal spa, massage and chiropractics. These are extremely beneficial in cases osteoarthritis.
  2. Medicines and drugs: Osteoarthritis can be kept under control and averted through specific medications. Drugs can be consumed orally or can be injected directly as per the prescription of the doctor if he or she forebodes an onset of osteoarthritis. Knee lubricants have also been helpful in curing osteoarthritis. For more severe conditions, specified medical attention may be required.
  3. Nutritional Supplements: For obtaining relief from joint pains, a proper and healthy diet is necessary. An enhanced supply of calciumvitamin D and Omega-3 fatty acids is thus mandatory for remedying and preventing osteoarthritis. A healthy diet builds your immunity and prevents such diseases.
  4. SurgeryAlthough not the favorite, knee replacement surgery is often undertaken even if initial signs of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis are detected. These are relatively hassle-free surgeries which go a long way in providing relief. However, you must follow the advice of the doctors thoroughly before opting for this.
  5. Acupuncture: Acupuncture has gained a lot of popularity in the recent times. Based on ancient techniques, this involves gently needling the various pressure points to purify the system from within and reduce the joint pains. They have extremely health boosting properties and contribute to one’s overall well-being.
1522 people found this helpful

Osteoarthritis - What You Should Know?

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, MRCEM(UK), MEM, Diploma in Rheumatology, PGCC - Rheumatology, MACEP, FCCS
Rheumatologist, Kolkata
Osteoarthritis - What You Should Know?

There are so many things we take for granted. For example, have you ever thought about how your fingers bend or how your knees open and fold to help you walk? It is only when these simple acts start becoming uncomfortable that we take a closer look at them. Osteoarthritis is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects the cartilage in our joints. As the cartilage breaks down, bones lose the buffer between them and every movement becomes stiff and painful.

Here are a few things you should know about osteoarthritis:

  1. Osteoarthritis is common: Osteoarthritis can affect both men and women but men have a higher risk of osteoarthritis as compared to women. This risk increases with age. Other risk factors associated with osteoarthritis include obesity, genetics, muscle weakness and previous joint injuries. The joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis include the knees, hips, and spine. It is important to note that though this condition is common, it is not inevitable.

  2. You can reduce your risk of Osteoarthritis: By making a few lifestyle changes you can reduce the chances of suffering from this condition. Controlling your blood sugar and weight are primary amongst these. Regular exercise is also necessary as it increases flexibility and keeps the joints supple. It also strengthens the bones and muscles. If your work involves heavy lifting avoid placing stress on your knees and instead lift the weight with your hips.

  3. Different people have different symptoms: This condition has a very slow progression rate and hence may go unnoticed in its early stages. While some people experience pain in the early stages, others may not realize anything is amiss until an X-ray shows the degenerated cartilage. It also progresses at different rates for each individual. The condition will progress faster in the case of people living with heavy stress or those with a sedentary lifestyle. Some of the common symptoms associated with osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, and swelling of the joints. Along with an X ray, blood tests will also be conducted to diagnose osteoarthritis. This helps rule out any other type of arthritis. In rare cases, osteoarthritis can cause joint deformities.

  4. Exercise is the best treatment for osteoarthritis: At present, there is no known cure for this disease. Medication like NSAIDS or paracetamol can help relieve the pain caused by movement but cannot help stop the cartilage degeneration or help new cartilage grow. Alternately Hyaluronic acid injections can be injected inside the affected joints, which slows the progression of the disease somewhat. Few studies also show some benefits with long-term use of medications like collagen type II, diacerin or glucosamine in relief of joint pain. However, exercise can be very beneficial. This helps strengthen the muscles around the joint and can even slow down the rate of degeneration. Low-intensity exercises such as walking, swimming, yoga, and cycling are ideal for osteoarthritis patients as they do not put any pressure on the joints.

2132 people found this helpful

Knee Pain In Elderly Patients!

Dr.Faraz Hanafi 87% (98ratings)
MBBS, d.ortho
General Physician, Lucknow
Knee Pain In Elderly Patients!

Most of the people over the age of 40 years suffer from knee pain which may be` due to osteoarthritis knee. To prevent it stop squatting, sitting cross-legged. Early physiotherapy is also helpful.

1 person found this helpful

Knee Osteoarthritis - What Should You Know?

MBBS, DNB - Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery, Fellowship in Minimally Invasive Knee and Hip Replacement, Fellowship in Joint Replacement & Arthroscopy
Orthopedic Doctor, Pune
Knee Osteoarthritis - What Should You Know?

The cartilage is the natural cushioning between two joints. When it wears off, the bones rub uncomfortably against each other as there is no shock absorption. Pain, swelling, stiffness, difficulty in moving and sometimes, the formation of bone spurs are the results of the rubbing. This condition is called osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis in the knee is very common, and can even occur in younger people, though the risk of developing it rises after age 45.

Causes of Knee Osteoarthritis

1. Age: The cartilage doesn't heal as effectively as a person gets older.
2. Weight: The more the weight, the more the pressure on the knee.
3. Hereditary: Genetic mutations and inherited abnormalities like the shape of bones lead to osteoarthritis.
4. Gender: Women over the age of 55 are more susceptible to osteoarthritis than men.
5. Repetitive stress injuries: People like weightlifters and such, who kneel, squat or lift 55 pounds or more, are likely to develop osteoarthritis in the knee due to the constant pressure on their joints.
6. Athletics: Athletes who play soccer, tennis or other sports that involve long-distance running can develop osteoarthritis.
7. Other illnesses: People who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, metabolic disorders like excess growth hormone or iron overload are at risk of developing osteoarthritis.

Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis

1. Feeling pain while moving but it gets a little better after resting
2. Swelling
3. Joints feel warm
4. Knee joints feeling stiff, especially after sitting for too long
5. Getting in and out of chairs, or going up and down a flight of stairs get difficult
6. Hearing a crackly sound whenever the knees move

Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

1. Weight loss: Even losing a small amount of weight will relieve stress from the joints.
2. Exercising: Strengthening the weak muscles around the joints through exercise makes it more stable and decreases the pain.
3. Pain relievers and anti-inflammatory drugs: Non-prescription drugs like acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen sodium can be taken to ease pain: But if problem persists, visit a doctor.
4. Injections of corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid into the knee: These are steroids that help with the inflammation.
5. Alternative therapies: Topical creams, supplements like glucosamine may be effective.
6. Physical and occupational therapy: Physical therapy strengthens muscles and increases flexibility in joints. Occupational therapy teaches how to do daily things, like housework, with less pain.
7. Surgery: If other treatments fail, surgery is a good option.

3294 people found this helpful

Role Of Intra-Articular Injection For Knee Osteoarthritis!

Dr.Himanshu Gupta 89% (56ratings)
Fellow Adult Knee Reconstruction and Sports Injuries, Fellowship in Interventional Pain Practice, MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Gurgaon
Role Of Intra-Articular Injection For Knee Osteoarthritis!

According to the recent estimates of UK, almost half of over 50-year-olds experience knee pain on an annual basis. One of the most common causes of knee pain is Osteoarthritis (OA). Knee Osteoarthritis is also known as wear-and-tear arthritis. In this type of problem, the natural cushioning between the cartilage and joints gradually worn out. When this occurs, the bones of the joints rub firmly against each other resulting in loss of shock-absorbing ability of cartilage. This causes pain, stiffness, bone spurs, and affects the ability to move. This can occur due to various reasons like age, heredity, gender, repetitive stress injuries, or knee illnesses.

There are many treatments and physical therapy available to treat this condition and lower the pain of the knee. Physical therapy includes lifestyle changes, exercises, yoga, etc. Oral pharmacological strategies such as anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), simple analgesia, or dietary supplements may also help in relieving the pain. However, this may not be beneficial for every patient. This is why there are other options available to treat advanced or symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis pain. This includes the intra-articular injections which are used to provide relief from chronic pain.

Intra-articular Injection for Knee Osteoarthritis

The role of intra-articular injections for Knee Osteoarthritis is to reduce pain and improve the knee function. Some of the most common intra-articular injections are:

Viscosupplementation

Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a type of glycosaminoglycan that naturally occurs in all synovial joints. It has several functions such as energy dissipation, shock absorption, and lubrication within the joints. It is a vital component and primarily responsible for the lubrication of synovial joints. It also has an anti-inflammatory effect. However, patients with Knee Osteoarthritis are deficient in hyaluronic acid.

Viscosupplementation reduces the deficiency of Hyaluronic acid. It is a procedure in which hyaluronate (a thick fluid) is introduced into the knee joint. This injection reduces the inflammation and pain, and increases the lubrication in the joint. For this process, patients required 3-5 injections per week.

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP)

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are used increasingly in recent years for the treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis. According to the study from the Hospital for Special Surgery, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can successfully treat Knee Osteoarthritis. It reduces pain and improves the functioning of the knee joint.

Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids are a common intra-articular injection that provides relief from pain and inflammation of the knee joints. These injections have a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties that helps in limiting the symptoms of Osteoarthritis. There are a variety of corticosteroids options available to the doctors and they usually advise a particular type of corticosteroid based on the patient’s condition. Hydrocortisone, methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, and betamethasone are some of the most commonly used corticosteroids.

Take Away

There are several treatment options available for treating Knee Osteoarthritis. Some of them include Intra-articular Injection. However, it is advisable to consult an orthopedic doctor before going for any treatment.

1489 people found this helpful

Osteoarthritis - Everything You Should Know!

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DNB - Rheumatology
Rheumatologist, Ahmedabad
Osteoarthritis - Everything You Should Know!

There are so many things we take for granted. For example, have you ever thought about how your fingers bend or how your knees open and fold to help you walk? It is only when these simple acts start becoming uncomfortable that we take a closer look at them. Osteoarthritis is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects the cartilage in our joints. As the cartilage breaks down, bones lose the buffer between them and every movement becomes stiff and painful.

Here are a few things you should know about osteoarthritis.

  1. Osteoarthritis is common: Osteoarthritis can affect both men and women but men have a higher risk of osteoarthritis as compared to women. This risk increases with age. Other risk factors associated with osteoarthritis include obesity, genetics, muscle weakness and previous joint injuries. The joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis include the knees, hips, and spine. It is important to note that though this condition is common, it is not inevitable.
  2. You can reduce your risk of Osteoarthritis: By making a few lifestyle changes you can reduce the chances of suffering from this condition. Controlling your blood sugar and weight are primary amongst these. Regular exercise is also necessary as it increases flexibility and keeps the joints supple. It also strengthens the bones and muscles. If your work involves heavy lifting avoid placing stress on your knees and instead lift the weight with your hips.
  3. Different people have different symptoms: This condition has a very slow progression rate and hence may go unnoticed in its early stages. While some people experience pain in the early stages, others may not realize anything is amiss until an X-ray shows the degenerated cartilage. It also progresses at different rates for each individual. The condition will progress faster in the case of people living with heavy stress or those with a sedentary lifestyle. Some of the common symptoms associated with osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, and swelling of the joints. Along with an X ray, blood tests will also be conducted to diagnose osteoarthritis. This helps rule out any other type of arthritis. In rare cases, osteoarthritis can cause joint deformities.
  4. Exercise is the best treatment for osteoarthritis: At present, there is no known cure for this disease. Medication can help relieve the pain caused by movement but cannot help stop the cartilage degeneration or help new cartilage grow. However, exercise can be very beneficial. This helps strengthen the muscles around the joint and can even slow down the rate of degeneration. Low-intensity exercises such as walking, swimming, yoga, and cycling are ideal for osteoarthritis patients as they do not put any pressure on the joints.
4114 people found this helpful

Osteoarthritis - How To Prevent It?

Fellowship in Rheumatology, MD (Medicine), AFIH, MBBS
Rheumatologist, Delhi
Osteoarthritis - How To Prevent It?

There are so many things we take for granted. For example, have you ever thought about how your fingers bend or how your knees open and fold to help you walk? It is only when these simple acts start becoming uncomfortable that we take a closer look at them. Osteoarthritis is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects the cartilage in our joints. As the cartilage breaks down, bones lose the buffer between them and every movement becomes stiff and painful.

Here are a few things you should know about osteoarthritis.

  1. Osteoarthritis is common: Osteoarthritis can affect both men and women but men have a higher risk of osteoarthritis as compared to women. This risk increases with age. Other risk factors associated with osteoarthritis include obesity, genetics, muscle weakness and previous joint injuries. The joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis include the knees, hips, and spine. It is important to note that though this condition is common, it is not inevitable.
  2. You can reduce your risk of Osteoarthritis: By making a few lifestyle changes you can reduce the chances of suffering from this condition. Controlling your blood sugar and weight are primary amongst these. Regular exercise is also necessary as it increases flexibility and keeps the joints supple. It also strengthens the bones and muscles. If your work involves heavy lifting avoid placing stress on your knees and instead lift the weight with your hips.
  3. Different people have different symptoms: This condition has a very slow progression rate and hence may go unnoticed in its early stages. While some people experience pain in the early stages, others may not realize anything is amiss until an X-ray shows the degenerated cartilage. It also progresses at different rates for each individual. The condition will progress faster in the case of people living with heavy stress or those with a sedentary lifestyle. Some of the common symptoms associated with osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, and swelling of the joints. Along with an X ray, blood tests will also be conducted to diagnose osteoarthritis. This helps rule out any other type of arthritis. In rare cases, osteoarthritis can cause joint deformities.
  4. Exercise is the best treatment for osteoarthritis: At present, there is no known cure for this disease. Medication can help relieve the pain caused by movement but cannot help stop the cartilage degeneration or help new cartilage grow. However, exercise can be very beneficial. This helps strengthen the muscles around the joint and can even slow down the rate of degeneration. Low-intensity exercises such as walking, swimming, yoga, and cycling are ideal for osteoarthritis patients as they do not put any pressure on the joints.
1308 people found this helpful

Osteoarthritis - How Can You Handle It Well?

DNB, MBBS, Fellowship in Joint Replacement
Orthopedic Doctor, Zirakpur
Osteoarthritis - How Can You Handle It Well?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects the joints (Knee, Hip) in your body. Cartilage covers the joints between bones, protecting and cushioning them. OA occurs when the cartilage breaks down, causing pain, swelling, and limited mobility. Some risk factors for OA include: Heredity, Gender, Age, Overweight and Inactive Lifestyle.

Women who have gone through menopause have a higher risk of getting OA because their bodies slow down or stop producing estrogen, which helps bones grow. OA can also be inherited.There is no cure for OA, however you can manage symptoms and reduce risk factors. If you do develop OA, there are many lifestyle changes you can make to slow the course of the disease.

Jobs that involve a lot of repetitive motion can be hard on your joints:

• kneeling
• lifting
• twisting
• running

Exercise:

Low-impact exercise can improve joint health. Look for activities that include strength training and stretching in addition to aerobic exercise. Regular exercise can help slow down, or even prevent, OA. Exercise helps people by:

• maintaining healthy joints
• relieving stiffness
• reducing pain and fatigue
• increasing muscle and bone strength

Maintain a healthy weight:

Excess weight is one of the biggest risk factors of OA, as it puts extra stress on your joints, which can speed up the deterioration of joint cartilage. Overweight and obese individuals are at high risk of developing OA. Losing weight can help reduce pain and improve symptoms.

Rest:

Exercise can help people develop healthy joints and muscles, but overuse of joints can increase the risk of developing OA. The key is balance. If your joints are swollen or achy, give them a break. Try to avoid using a swollen joint for at least 12 to 24 hours. Letting an injured joint heal helps reduce the risk of developing OA there in the future.

Control blood sugar:

Diabetes may be a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis. High glucose levels can speed up the formation of molecules that make cartilage stiff, and diabetes can also trigger inflammation that can accelerate cartilage loss. Keeping diabetes under control and regulating your glucose levels can help prevent OA.

Although there is no cure for osteoarthritis, there are many ways to prevent it and manage its symptoms. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle with low-impact exercise, getting adequate rest and enough sleep, and maintaining a healthy diet and weight are simple ways you can reduce and manage OA symptoms so that you can live a healthy and fulfilling life.

2682 people found this helpful
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