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Minor Wounds Tips

Wounds vs Bruises - Know More!

Dr. Ayan Mukherjee 88% (32 ratings)
MD - Pharmacology, Diploma In Endocrinology
General Physician, Kolkata
Wounds vs Bruises - Know More!

Wounds and bruises are both injuries. However, they differ widely in terms of the causing factors, the nature of the injury, the pain they cause and the kind of treatment they require.

The following are a few of the myriad ways in which the two injuries differ from each other:

1. A wound causes quick damage - the skin tissue is cut or punctured while a bruise (also called a closed wound) is where the skin is not torn.

2. A wound is usually caused by a sharp object but bruises are the results of blunt force or trauma.

3. A wound almost certainly bleeds due to ruptured tissue and blood vessels. Blunt injury also damages the blood capillaries of the skin and causes blood to accumulate under the skin tissue, creating a dark patch of skin. Blood vessels can also break due to lifting of heavy objects or overexertion of muscles.

4. A wound carries the risk of infection because the skin is open but a bruise does not get infected.

5. A wound has a burning or stinging sensation but a bruise is characterized by swelling and a blunt throbbing pain.

6. A wound can be healed by antiseptic and antibiotic medication. Large wounds need to be closed by stitching them up to avoid severe infection. On the other hand, a bruise usually heals by itself. A cold compress and pain killers may be used to ease discomfort. Heat can be applied to the injured spot to normalize the blood flow and dissolve the blood clot.

7. A wound can lead to complications like bacterial infections or the healing might be delayed by chronic diseases like diabetes. In case of a bruise, it usually does not cause complications but if there's a blunt injury to sensitive areas like the head, the tailbone or the eyes, medical attention is advised.

8. Wounds and bruises can also be differentiated on the basis of their subtypes.

Different types of wounds are:

a. Incision (sharp objects cutting the dermis layer of skin)
b. Abrasion (the epithelial tissue is scraped off)
c. Avulsion (a body structure is torn off)
d. Penetration (a sharp object causes an entry and an exit wound)
e. Puncture (only an entry wound caused by a sharp object)

Different types of bruises are:

a. Hematoma (blood pools under the skin)
b. Purpura(tiny spots of blood on the inside of the mouth)
c. Contusion (similar to hematoma and caused by external trauma)
d. Crush injury (caused due to a large amount of force on the body part for a long time)

Why Wounds In Diabetic Patients Can Cause Severe Problems?

Dr. Anantharaman Ramakrishnan 82% (55 ratings)
DM - Endocrinology, MBBS, MD - Medicine
Endocrinologist, Bangalore
Why Wounds In Diabetic Patients Can Cause Severe Problems?

Diabetes is a chronic condition where glucose level of your body rises too high. There are two types of diabetes type 1 and type 2. In case of type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin and people suffering from this condition have to depend on insulin injections for the rest of their life. In case of type 2 diabetes the body produces less amount of insulin which is not enough for the proper functioning of the body. This type of diabetes can be kept under control by following a healthy diet and practicing exercise regularly.

Why diabetic wounds can cause severe problems?
Diabetes can cause a number of complications that makes it harder for certain wounds to heal. These include:

  1. Nerve damage: Until a cut or blister worsens and becomes inflamed, in case of neuropathy, you will not experience the pain. Diabetics often suffer from neuropathy, making it difficult for wounds to heal.
  2. Weak immune system: A minor wound may even get severe and become infected if your immune system fails to exercise its natural defenses.
  3. Narrow arteries: Blocked arteries may cause severe wounds which becomes difficult to heal. Clogged arteries make it difficult for the blood to flow to the affected area which slows the process of wound healing.

Treating a diabetic wound
You can follow the methods mentioned below to avoid getting infected:

  1. Taking care of the wound immediately. If the wound is not cleaned and taken care of, letting bacteria to build up, it can lead to infection.
  2. Avoid using soaps and hydrogen peroxide to irritate the injury. Use antibiotic lotions to prevent infection and use a sterile bandage to keep the affected area covered.
  3. Consult your doctor before any minor problems turn to larger ones
  4. Since the bottom of the foot is a common place for developing blisters and calluses in case of diabetic people, try to keep pressure off the wound as it slowly heals

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2747 people found this helpful

Cuts And Wounds - What Should You Do To Treat Them?

Dr. C.S. Sidana 87% (90 ratings)
MBBS, DNB, Indian Diploma In Critical Care Medicine
General Physician, Gurgaon
Cuts And Wounds - What Should You Do To Treat Them?

Small cuts can be easily treated at your home if the chances of getting infected are low or the injury isn’t severe. You can clean and apply bandage to a small injury at your home without the need of visiting a doctor. First aid treatment is always recommended at home in all cases to prevent deterioration of a wound before you can visit a proper medical facility.

Here are some of the most widely followed procedures to treat cuts and small wounds at home 

 

  1. The first step in treating the cut is to stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure on the wound. You may also find many non prescription products available which you can use to stop the flow of blood. If you feel that the situation is getting worse or out of control, then get to a doctor or a medical facility as soon as possible.

  2. The second step in treating a wound is to clean the wound to avoid any possible chances of contracting infections and to remove dirt left in the wound. You can also use tweezers to remove any pieces of external material stuck in the wound. Wash the wound with cool water to avoid dirt being leftover which can cause infections.

  3. Avoid the use of hydrogen peroxide, mercurochrome and rubbing alcohol which can cause a lot of harm to your tissues and also increase the amount of time taken to heal. The chemicals may actually damage tissue more than promote healing or disinfect the area. Instead, keep doctor recommended products which are known to heal scar bruises and small cuts.

  4. Stitches and staples will be required if your doctor decides to close the wound externally. Your doctor will give you instructions to follow and also inform you about the time it would take for the wound to heal. The next procedure would be to remove the stitch after the wound has settled and would again require you to visit your nearby health care provider.

  5. You should always follow the instructions of your doctor and avoid any further injury to your affected part. Even if the injury is serious it is important that first aid is administered properly until you can reach medical help.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4981 people found this helpful

Wound Healing Post A Surgical Procedure!

MS - General Surgery, MBBS
General Surgeon, Varanasi
Wound Healing Post A Surgical Procedure!

What is wound healing?
Wound healing is a process in which the body repairs itself after an injury by the complex mechanism by replacing destroyed tissues. It includes three types of intentions, and they are as follows:

1. Healing by primary intention
It includes healing in which restoration of continuity occurs by fibrous adhesion. Formation of granulation tissue does not take place and results in a thin scar.

2. Healing by secondary intention
In this type, healing takes place by adhesion of granulating surfaces. It occurs when the edges of the wound are far apart, and cannot be brought together.

3. Healing by tertiary intention
It is a combination of primary and secondary intention healing. In this type, the gradual filling of a wound cavity occurs by granulations, and by cicatrix formation. In this process various growth factors are involved, such as epidermal growth factor, vasculo-endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor.

How wound healing occurs?
Wound healing is divided into following phases:

  1. Establishment of rapid homeostasis: In this phase, the actual bleeding stops. It is accomplished by vasoconstriction, in which blood vessels contract to stop bleeding.
  2. Stage of inflammation: During this phase neutrophils (white blood cells) proliferates at the site of a wound to destroy bacteria, and to remove debris. The neutrophils are at highest count between 24, and 48 hours after an injury, and get reduced after 3 days. After that specialized cells called macrophage arrives to continue the process. These cells secrete growth factors and proteins that facilitate tissue repair. This phase lasts for 4 to 6 days and shows symptoms of edema, redness, heat, and pain.
  3. Proliferation and migration of the cells: During the process of inflammation, the body releases cell which causes migration, and proliferation. In this phase, epithelial cells proliferate to overlap the wound, and this phase can last from 4 days to 24 days.
  4. Formation of blood vessel: It is also known as angiogenesis. In this process body’s cells begin to replace the veins, and arteries which are damaged. In this process, the body either creates new vessels or adds onto the existing vessels. Along with this collagen deposition, granulation formation also occurs.
  5. Stage of reepithelialization: Once the blood vessels are formed, the damage tissues also start regrowing.
  6. Stage of synthesis: It is the last step, or it can occur simultaneously with above stages. In this process, blood clots are formed, which helps in prevention of further bleeding.

What are the complications of wound healing?
Most common complications are as follows:

  1. Deficient scar formation
  2. Excessive scar formation, such as a hypertrophic scar, keloids, etc.
  3. Deficient contraction of wound or excessive contraction
  4. Infection

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3009 people found this helpful

Diabetes and Wound Healing: Why Is It Slower?

Dr. Anurag Bajpai 86% (12 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Paediatrics, FRACP - Pediatrc Endocrinology, SCE, Endocrinology
Endocrinologist, Kanpur
Diabetes and Wound Healing: Why Is It Slower?

Diabetes is a chronic condition where glucose level of your body rises too high. There are two types of diabetes type 1 and type 2. In case of type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin and people suffering from this condition have to depend on insulin injections for the rest of their life. In case of type 2 diabetes the body produces less amount of insulin which is not enough for the proper functioning of the body. This type of diabetes can be kept under control by following a healthy diet and practicing exercise regularly.

Why diabetic wounds can cause severe problems?
Diabetes can cause a number of complications that makes it harder for certain wounds to heal. These include:

  1. Nerve damage: Until a cut or blister worsens and becomes inflamed, in case of neuropathy, you will not experience the pain. Diabetics often suffer from neuropathy, making it difficult for wounds to heal.
  2. Weak immune system: A minor wound may even get severe and become infected if your immune system fails to exercise its natural defenses.
  3. Narrow arteries: Blocked arteries may cause severe wounds which becomes difficult to heal. Clogged arteries make it difficult for the blood to flow to the affected area which slows the process of wound healing.

Treating a diabetic wound
You can follow the methods mentioned below to avoid getting infected:

  1. Taking care of the wound immediately. If the wound is not cleaned and taken care of, letting bacteria to build up, it can lead to infection.
  2. Avoid using soaps and hydrogen peroxide to irritate the injury. Use antibiotic lotions to prevent infection and use a sterile bandage to keep the affected area covered.
  3. Consult your doctor before any minor problems turn to larger ones
  4. Since the bottom of the foot is a common place for developing blisters and calluses in case of diabetic people, try to keep pressure off the wound as it slowly heals.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3337 people found this helpful

Wounds On The Feet, Not Healing? Know Why Is It The Case!

Dr. Rahul. N.S 92% (121 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Vascular Surgery, F.V.E.S
Vascular Surgeon, Bangalore
Wounds On The Feet, Not Healing? Know Why Is It The Case!

An injury runs its course of a few days to weeks depending on the size and heals and closes. There could be scarring or mobility issues in some though. However, this does not happen in all cases, and a wound that has not healed for more than 6 weeks is termed as chronic. They are most common in the hands and feet. In those who have mobility issues, hips, buttocks, and thighs are also common areas.

Read on to know more about why this happens and how they can be treated.

Reasons: Though there could health conditions aggravating the healing, most wounds heal late due to 3 reasons:

  1. Poor circulation: A healing wound requires nutrition for the cells to repair, and if there is improper circulation, then healing is definitely delayed. This can happen due to diabetes, malnutrition, reduced mobility, vascular disease, etc. In many unsuspecting people, nonhealing wounds have led to diabetes being diagnosed. Diabetes also affects nerve supply, so delayed healing may go unnoticed too. Post injury, it is also important to completely stop movement, as circulation needs to be maintained for proper, quick healing.
  2. Infection: By preventing tissue regeneration and interfering with blood clotting, they can prolong bleeding and cause chronic inflammation. This leads to delayed healing and in most cases, worsening of the current situation.
  3. Fluid accumulation/edema: Any injury causes leakage of cellular fluid into the surrounding tissues. This causes edema and the surrounding tissue is often swollen. This leads to poor circulation also, which is another cause for delayed healing. Edema also reduces tissue repair difficult, not allowing skin to form over the wound.

Symptoms: While the wound per se is an indication, there are also other symptoms which indicate a non-healing wound.

  1. Pain, which has not subsided
  2. Swelling, discharge, odor, and skin color changes due to the ongoing infection. A thin discharge is not worrisome, but a thicker or foul-smelling discharge is definitely a cause for concern
  3. Open wound: Most wounds heal within the 30-day period. If the wound is open beyond that, it is always advisable to seek medical support.

Management: This would include generic and local treatment.

Generic treatment would include a nutritious diet, good sleep and rest, adequate exercise and rehab program to ensure adequate mobility, and frequent monitoring. In addition, conditions like diabetes have to be monitored and brought under control.

Local treatment options would be:

  1. Wound debridement and skin or tissue grafting
  2. Medications to improve wound healing
  3. Hyperbaric oxygen to provide more oxygen to the wound in particular
  4. Vascular repair to improve circulation.

Delayed healing of wounds should not be ignored; timely medical help can avoid complications.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2127 people found this helpful
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