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Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Health Feed

Know Everything About Hysterectomy!

MBBS, DNB - Obstetrics and Gynecology, DGO
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Know Everything About Hysterectomy!

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. The uterus, also known as the womb, is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The uterine lining is the source of menstrual blood.
You may need a hysterectomy for many reasons. The surgery can be used to treat a number of chronic pain conditions as well as certain types of cancer and infections.

A woman may have a hysterectomy for different reasons, including:

  1. Uterine fibroids that cause pain, bleeding, or other problems
  2. Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its normal position into the vaginal canal
  3. Cancer of the uterus, cervix, or ovaries
  4. Endometriosis
  5. Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  6. Chronic pelvic pain
  7. Adenomyosis, or a thickening of the uterus
  8. Hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons is usually considered only after all other treatment approaches have been tried without success.

Types of Hysterectomy: 
Depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, a surgeon may choose to remove all or only part of the uterus. Patients and health care providers sometimes use these terms inexactly, so it is important to clarify if the cervix and/or ovaries are removed:

In Partial or supracervical hysterectomy, the upper portion of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.

Complete or total hysterectomy involves the removal of both the uterus and the cervix. This is the most common type of hysterectomy performed.

Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.

Radical hysterectomy is an extensive surgical procedure in which the uterus, cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper vagina, some surrounding tissue, and lymph nodes are removed.

Hysterectomy Surgical Procedures
Traditionally, hysterectomies have been performed using a technique known as total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). However, in recent years, two less-invasive procedures have been developed: Vaginal hysterectomy and Laparoscopic hysterectomy:

  1. Total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH): In a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), the surgeon makes an incision approximately five inches long in the abdominal wall, cutting through skin and connective tissue to reach the uterus. This type of surgery is especially useful if there are large fibroids or if cancer is suspected. Disadvantages include more pain and a longer recovery time than other procedures, and a larger scar.
  2. Vaginal hysterectomy: A vaginal hysterectomy is done through a small incision at the top of the vagina. Through the incision, the uterus (and cervix, if necessary) is separated from its connecting tissue and blood supply and removed through the vagina. This procedure is often used for conditions such as uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy heals faster than abdominal hysterectomy, results in less pain, and generally does not cause external scarring.
  3. Laparoscopic hysterectomy: During a laparoscopic hysterectomy, your doctor uses a tiny instrument called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera at the front. The instrument is inserted through incisions in the abdomen. Three or four small incisions are made instead of one large incision. Once the surgeon can see your uterus, they will cut the uterus into small pieces and remove one piece at a time.

A hysterectomy is a major decision that you should take after careful consultation with a doctor. You should understand the reason for the operation, the benefits and risks and the alternatives to a hysterectomy. If you are unsure, discuss the issue with your doctor or obtain a second opinion.

3907 people found this helpful

All About Hysterectomy

Visiting Consultant - (Apollo Cradle - Nehru Enclave) , MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS, Apollo Spectra - Kailash colony,Paras Bliss - East of kailash, Moolchand - Lajpat Nagar Neelkanth - Gurgaon
Gynaecologist, Delhi
All About Hysterectomy

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. The uterus, also known as the womb, is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The uterine lining is the source of menstrual blood.
You may need a hysterectomy for many reasons. The surgery can be used to treat a number of chronic pain conditions as well as certain types of cancer and infections.

A woman may have a hysterectomy for different reasons, including:

  1. Uterine fibroids that cause pain, bleeding, or other problems
  2. Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its normal position into the vaginal canal
  3. Cancer of the uterus, cervix, or ovaries
  4. Endometriosis
  5. Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  6. Chronic pelvic pain
  7. Adenomyosis, or a thickening of the uterus
  8. Hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons is usually considered only after all other treatment approaches have been tried without success.

Types of Hysterectomy: 
Depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, a surgeon may choose to remove all or only part of the uterus. Patients and health care providers sometimes use these terms inexactly, so it is important to clarify if the cervix and/or ovaries are removed:

In partial or supracervical hysterectomy, the upper portion of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.

Complete or total hysterectomy involves the removal of both the uterus and the cervix. This is the most common type of hysterectomy performed.

Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.

Radical hysterectomy is an extensive surgical procedure in which the uterus, cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper vagina, some surrounding tissue, and lymph nodes are removed.

Hysterectomy Surgical Procedures
Traditionally, hysterectomies have been performed using a technique known as total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). However, in recent years, two less-invasive procedures have been developed: Vaginal hysterectomy and Laparoscopic hysterectomy:

  1. Total Abdominal Hysterectomy (TAH): In a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), the surgeon makes an incision approximately five inches long in the abdominal wall, cutting through skin and connective tissue to reach the uterus. This type of surgery is especially useful if there are large fibroids or if cancer is suspected. Disadvantages include more pain and a longer recovery time than other procedures, and a larger scar.
  2. Vaginal Hysterectomy: A vaginal hysterectomy is done through a small incision at the top of the vagina. Through the incision, the uterus (and cervix, if necessary) is separated from its connecting tissue and blood supply and removed through the vagina. This procedure is often used for conditions such as uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy heals faster than abdominal hysterectomy, results in less pain, and generally does not cause external scarring.
  3. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: During a laparoscopic hysterectomy, your doctor uses a tiny instrument called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera at the front. The instrument is inserted through incisions in the abdomen. Three or four small incisions are made instead of one large incision. Once the surgeon can see your uterus, they will cut the uterus into small pieces and remove one piece at a time.

A hysterectomy is a major decision that you should take after careful consultation with your doctor. You should understand the reason for the operation, the benefits and risks and the alternatives to a hysterectomy. If you are unsure, discuss the issue with your doctor or obtain a second opinion.

3291 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Know More About It!

MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Hysterectomy - Know More About It!

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. The uterus, also known as the womb, is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The uterine lining is the source of menstrual blood.

You may need a hysterectomy for many reasons. The surgery can be used to treat a number of chronic pain conditions as well as certain types of cancer and infections.

A woman may have a hysterectomy for different reasons, including:

  1. Uterine fibroids that cause pain, bleeding, or other problems
  2. Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its normal position into the vaginal canal
  3. Cancer of the uterus, cervix, or ovaries
  4. Endometriosis
  5. Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  6. Chronic pelvic pain
  7. Adenomyosis, or a thickening of the uterus

Hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons is usually considered only after all other treatment approaches have been tried without success.

Types of Hysterectomy-

Depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, a surgeon may choose to remove all or only part of the uterus. Patients and health care providers sometimes use these terms inexactly, so it is important to clarify if the cervix and/or ovaries are removed:

  • In partial or supracervical hysterectomy, the upper portion of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.
  • Complete or total hysterectomy involves the removal of both the uterus and the cervix. This is the most common type of hysterectomy performed.
  • Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.
  • Radical hysterectomy is an extensive surgical procedure in which the uterus, cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper vagina, some surrounding tissue, and lymph nodes are removed.

Hysterectomy Surgical Procedures-

Traditionally, hysterectomies have been performed using a technique known as total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). However, in recent years, two less-invasive procedures have been developed: Vaginal hysterectomy and Laparoscopic hysterectomy:

  1. Total Abdominal Hysterectomy (TAH): In a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), the surgeon makes an incision approximately five inches long in the abdominal wall, cutting through skin and connective tissue to reach the uterus. This type of surgery is especially useful if there are large fibroids or if cancer is suspected. Disadvantages include more pain and a longer recovery time than other procedures, and a larger scar.
  2. Vaginal Hysterectomy: A vaginal hysterectomy is done through a small incision at the top of the vagina. Through the incision, the uterus (and cervix, if necessary) is separated from its connecting tissue and blood supply and removed through the vagina. This procedure is often used for conditions such as uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy heals faster than abdominal hysterectomy, results in less pain, and generally does not cause external scarring.
  3. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: During a laparoscopic hysterectomy, your doctor uses a tiny instrument called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera at the front. The instrument is inserted through incisions in the abdomen. Three or four small incisions are made instead of one large incision. Once the surgeon can see your uterus, they will cut the uterus into small pieces and remove one piece at a time.

A hysterectomy is a major decision that you should take after careful consultation with your doctor. You should understand the reason for the operation, the benefits and risks and the alternatives to a hysterectomy. If you are unsure, discuss the issue with your doctor or obtain a second opinion.  In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3427 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Everything You Should Know About It!

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MRCOG
Gynaecologist, Kolkata
Hysterectomy - Everything You Should Know About It!

hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. The uterus, also known as the womb, is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The uterine lining is the source of menstrual blood.
You may need a hysterectomy for many reasons. The surgery can be used to treat a number of conditions including certain types of cancer and infections.

A woman may have a hysterectomy for different reasons, including:

  1. Uterine fibroids that cause painbleeding, or other problems
  2. Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its normal position into the vaginal canal
  3. Cancer of the uterus, cervix, or ovaries
  4. Endometriosis
  5. Abnormal uterine bleeding
  6. Chronic pelvic pain
  7. Adenomyosis, or a thickening of the uterus
  8. Hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons is usually considered only after all other treatment approaches have been tried without success.

Types of Hysterectomy: 
Depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, a surgeon may choose to remove all or only part of the uterus. Patients and health care providers sometimes use these terms inexactly, so it is important to clarify if the cervix and/or ovaries are removed:

In partial or supracervical hysterectomy, the upper portion of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.

Complete or total hysterectomy involves the removal of both the uterus and the cervix. This is the most common type of hysterectomy performed.

Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.

Radical hysterectomy is an extensive surgical procedure in which the uterus, cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper vagina, some surrounding tissue, and lymph nodes are removed.

Hysterectomy Surgical Procedures
Traditionally, hysterectomies have been performed using a technique known as total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). However, in recent years, two less-invasive procedures have been developed: Vaginal hysterectomy and Laparoscopic hysterectomy:

  1. Total Abdominal Hysterectomy (TAH): In a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), the surgeon makes an incision approximately five inches long in the abdominal wall, cutting through skin and connective tissue to reach the uterus. This type of surgery is especially useful if there are large fibroids or if cancer is suspected. Disadvantages include more pain and a longer recovery time than other procedures, and a larger scar.
  2. Vaginal Hysterectomy: A vaginal hysterectomy is done through a small incision at the top of the vagina. Through the incision, the uterus (and cervix, if necessary) is separated from its connecting tissue and blood supply and removed through the vagina. This procedure is often used for conditions such as uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy heals faster than abdominal hysterectomy, results in less pain, and generally does not cause external scarring.
  3. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: During a laparoscopic hysterectomy, your doctor uses a tiny instrument called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera at the front. The instrument is inserted through incisions in the abdomen. Three or four small incisions are made instead of one large incision. Its advantage is less bleeding, less pain, faster recovery and shorter hospital stay. Its technically advanced and demands a lot of skill on the part of the surgeon.

A hysterectomy is a major decision that you should take after careful consultation with your doctor. You should understand the reason for the operation, the benefits and risks and the alternatives to a hysterectomy.

2683 people found this helpful

What Is Hysterectomy?

MBBS, Certified IVF Specialist, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
IVF Specialist, Mohali
What Is Hysterectomy?

The removal of the uterus is known as a hysterectomy. This is a fairly common procedure and may or may not include the removal of the ovaries as well. A hysterectomy may be partial or complete and can be performed abdominally, vaginally or laparoscopically. A partial hysterectomy includes only the removal of the uterus and leaves the cervix in its place. A complete hysterectomy removes both the uterus and the cervix.

There are many reasons for women to undergo a hysterectomy. Treatment of uterine fibroids, endometriosis, uterine prolapsed and cancerous growths are the most common amongst these. There are alternatives to a hysterectomy in most cases and hence, a woman should know all the details about her case before undergoing such a surgery. The only case where hysterectomy is the only solution is in the case of cancerous growths.

The uterus does more than just act as a home for a growing fetus. Hence, the removal of a woman uterus can have a significant effect on her health.

Inability to bear children
For a woman in her thirties, the inability to bear children is the biggest effect of a hysterectomy. Some women may also experience a lowered libido. This is seen mostly in cases where the ovaries are removed along with the uterus. Some women may also face difficulties achieving an orgasm.

Anatomical changes
When the uterus is removed the spine compresses and makes the rib cage move downwards. This makes the hip bones move outwards and widen. As a result the anatomy of a woman changes to give her a wider waist and protruding belly. She may also lose a little height. Vaginal dryness is another physiological change that is triggered by a hysterectomy.

Surgical menopause
If the hysterectomy surgery includes the removal of ovaries, it is followed instantly by menopause. This is regardless of your age. If the ovaries are left intact, there is a risk of menopause occurring within the next five years. Some of the symptoms of menopause are:
A)Hot flushes
B)Depression
C)Insomnia
D)Fatigue
E)Irritability and
F)Vaginal dryness

Depression
Depression is a common side effect of a hysterectomy when it is performed on women in their thirties. The inability to bear children is partly responsible for this. This depression is usually temporary as long as the woman has a good support system in the form of friends and family. In some cases, this depression could also give rise to suicidal feelings.

4257 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Why It Is Done?

DNB - Obstetrics & Gynecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Pune
Hysterectomy - Why It Is Done?

A hysterectomy is an operation to remove the uterus and, usually, the cervix. The ovaries and tubes may or may not be removed during this procedure, depending on the reasons for the surgery being performed. If the ovaries are removed, you will commence menopause. A hysterectomy is a major surgical procedure with physical and psychological consequences.

Why is a hysterectomy performed?

Common reasons include painful or heavy periods, pelvic pain, fibroids or as a part of therapy for cancer. You should have a clear understanding of your reason for this surgery.

How is this done?

The procedure is normally performed under a general anesthetic and takes approximately one hour. To commence your anesthetic a drip is inserted into your arm. Once you are asleep, you will have a urinary catheter inserted. The importance of the catheter is to reduce the size of your bladder, keeping it away from the operation site and reducing the risk of complications.

There are three ways to remove the uterus:

  1. Vaginal hysterectomyThe removal of the uterus and the closing of the wound is performed through the vagina. There is no cut in the abdomen. 
  2. Laparoscopic hysterectomy - About four small keyhole cuts are made in the abdomen to divide the attachments of uterus, ovaries, and tubes in the pelvis. The uterus is usually then removed through the vagina.
  3. Abdominal hysterectomy - The uterus is removed through a cut in the lower abdomen. The cut is about 15–20 cm in length and runs across your abdomen, usually below the bikini line. Less commonly, it may be necessary to have a cut that runs from the belly button down to the pubic area.

What are the risks of undergoing this procedure?

  • Although the risks associated with hysterectomy are low, you should be aware that every surgical procedure has some risk. This may also depend upon the type of surgery you have. 
  • Severe bleeding from large blood vessels around the uterus or top of the vagina. This is not common. A blood transfusion may be required to replace blood loss. A vaginal pack may also be used to control the bleeding.
  • Infection in the operation site, pelvis or urinary tract.
  • Nearby organs such as the ureter (tube leading from kidney to bladder), bladder or bowel may be injured—expected to happen to approximately one in every 140 women. Further surgery will be needed to repair the injuries.
  • The bowel may not work well after the operation; this is usually temporary. Treatment may include a drip to give fluids into the vein and no food or fluids by mouth.

Things to do before you come to the hospital

  • It is important for you to have all the tests ordered at your outpatient clinic appointment completed prior to coming to the hospital these include blood tests and an ECG and chest X-ray, if you are more than 50 years old

  • You may be required to have a bowel preparation, which will empty your bowel prior to the surgery.

  • You should stop eating and drinking at the following times on the day of your surgery unless otherwise notified

    • At midnight if your procedure is in the morning

    • At 6 am if your procedure is in the afternoon.

  • You will need to shower and dress in clean clothes prior to coming into hospital. It is important that you do not shave your operation site as this increases the risk of wound infection.

  • Please remove all body jewellery.

After your surgery

  • When you wake from the anesthetic, you will be ready to be transferred, in your bed, for recovery.

  • Having an anesthetic can make you feel sick and may cause vomiting. You will have a drip in your arm which is necessary to maintain fluid intake and provide pain relief. This will remain in until you can tolerate food and fluids and your pain control is changed to oral medication.

  • Your nurse will take frequent observations of your vital signs e.g. temperature, pulse, blood pressure.

  • You may have small amounts of water or ice to suck, then progress from fluids to a normal diet as tolerated.

  • If you have pain or nausea, please tell your nurse. Effective pain management is important.

  • You will have a urinary catheter in place. The catheter will normally be removed the day following your surgery.

Recovering at home

What to expect

  • You may have a blood-stained vaginal discharge which is similar to a light period. This will gradually reduce to nil over 4-6 weeks as your internal wounds heal

  • You may need to take some simple analgesia for pain/discomfort, especially on waking and settling at night

  • You may feel fatigued

  • You may require up to four to six weeks off work. You should have returned to normal activity by two to three months, depending on the type of surgery, although full recovery may take longer

  • After the operation, you will no longer have a period

  • For the majority of women, hysterectomy surgery does not have a negative effect on sexual function

What to avoid

  • For the first two to three weeks lift nothing greater than two kilograms. Increase gently as tolerated over six weeks.

  • It will take about three weeks before you should drive a car. Only when you know you can act confidently with emergency breaking should you attempt driving the car.

  • Avoid sexual intercourse for six weeks to allow healing to take place.

  • Avoid inserting anything into the vagina for six weeks to allow time for healing to take place (e.g. use sanitary pads and not tampons).

It is important to avoid constipation and straining immediately after your surgery as this will assist healing and improve your comfort.

Contact your doctor if you develop any of the following complications:

  • Your wound becomes red or inflamed, painful.

  • You have heavy vaginal bleeding—heavier than a normal period.

  • You have offensive vaginal discharge.

  • You develop a fever i.e. temperature of about 38° C, or you are feeling unwell.

  • You have pain that is not relieved by simple analgesia.

  • You are having difficulty passing urine or opening your bowels.

5534 people found this helpful

Plz tell me about the post laparoscopic hysterectomy precautions. What things are taken care by patient after laparoscopic hysterectomy surgery.

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Hello, When were you operated? Laparoscopic Hysterectomy have its own benefits .You can continue all your routine activities including going on stairs ,lifting normal weights ,walking 24 hours after surgery .In fact these activities causes earlier healing .But strenuous activity should be better avoided like gym, or swimming for 2 weeks only .I hope it Helps!
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Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy (TLRH) - All About It!

MBBS, MS General Surgery, FRCS
General Surgeon, Ludhiana
Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy (TLRH) - All About It!

Cervical cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in females. It is also one of the leading causes of death in women. Women in developed and developing countries, both are burdened alike from cervical cancer. Ineffective diagnosis, lack of awareness, neglect, ignorance, focus on other health issues, and insufficient attention to female health are the leading factors that are causing the graph to get steeper.

Cervical cancer can easily be detected in its early stages so that timely and appropriate treatment is possible. However, due to faulty and ill-equipped healthcare facilities, regular screening tests are not conducted. This leads to a delayed diagnosis and treatment, that aggravates the situation. Radical Hysterectomy is considered as the most important mode of treatment of cervical cancer. However, the clinical stage of cancer and its severity determine the plan of the treatment. It can either be only the surgery or a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation depending upon the situation.

Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy (TLRH) is a minimally invasive procedure that shows promising results in the early treatment of cervical cancer. It is a safe and effective procedure. The procedure is associated with faster recovery, less loss of blood, faster return of bowel function post operation, fewer abdominal wall infections, better cosmetic result, and reduced febrile morbidity. Thus, it is preferred for Abdominal Hysterectomy. However, it consumes more time during the procedure itself.

Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy includes detaching the entire uterine cervix from the body through laparoscopy and suturing the vaginal cuff with its surrounding supporting structures. The uterus is then removed through the abdomen or through the vagina.

When is it needed?

Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy is required when there is an evidence of cervical cancer. It is determined before the procedure by a biopsy done by the gynecologist. This surgery removes the primary source of cancer. It is also determined whether cancer has spread to any other or surrounding tissue.

Hence, a Radical Hysterectomy removes the uterus, cervix, and extra tissue around the cervix. If the cells in this tissue are non-cancerous, it is called ‘clear margins’ which is a good sign regarding the success of the surgery.

Before the Procedure:

A series of tests might be required to plan the surgery. These include blood profile tests, ultrasound, CT scans, MRIs, Echocardiography, Pulmonary Function Tests, etc.

Advantages:

  1. There are no large incisions in the abdomen because of the laparoscopic approach rather than the open surgery.

  2. There is less amount of blood loss during this type of surgery.

  3. There is less risk of infection.

  4. There is reduced febrile morbidity.

  5. There is less risk of adhesions. Adhesions refer to the sticking together of organs or tissues inside the body due to scarring.

  6. Bowel function returns to normal quickly in this case.

  7. There is less need for pain medication (analgesic) post-surgery.

  8. Shorter time is required to be spent staying at the hospital.

  9. There is a shorter recovery time involved and the patient is allowed to resume normal daily activities in a very short period of time, for example, generally within a month. However, heavy lifting should be avoided.

  10. There is an increase in patient comfort.

Take Away:

Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy (TLRH) is the most favored method for the treatment of cervical cancer in women. It is minimally invasive and easier to manage to post the procedure.

2134 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Tips to Help You Recover Fast!

DGO , MBBS
Gynaecologist, Pune
Hysterectomy - Tips to Help You Recover Fast!

The surgical procedure that is used for uterus removal of a female patient is known as a hysterectomy. From uterine fibroids to cancer in the uterus, there may be a variety of reasons for carrying out this procedure. Here is everything you need to know about the procedure and recovery.

Causes: There are a number of reasons for which one may have to undergo a hysterectomy. If uterine fibroids and other kinds of growth are causing severe pelvic pain and bleeding, then it may be required. This also applied to particularly painful endometriosis. Abnormal vaginal bleeding as well as severe and chronic pelvic pain, are enough of reasons by themselves for going in for this kind of surgery to remove the uterus. Also, when the uterus slides away from its normal position and slips into the vaginal canal, this signifies a condition known as Uterine Prolapse, which will also require treatment in the form of a hysterectomy. Andenomyosis is another reason why this surgery may be required, as this condition results in the thickening of the organ. Finally, if the patient is suffering from cervical or ovarian cancer, then the doctor may recommend this surgery to remove the uterus in case the tumour found has been tested as malignant.

Technique: There are various techniques that may be followed in the course of this surgery, depending on the location, the size and the severity of the condition and the growth that is associated with it. 

  1. Open Surgery Hysterectomy: This involves an incision of six to seven inches, in the belly of the patient so as to act on the abdominal region. After recovery, there will be a visible scar on the stomach of the patient.
  2. MIP Hysterectomy: The various approaches for this technique include vaginal hysterectomy, laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy, and robot assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy.

Risks: While this is mostly known as a low risk procedure, there may be various risks after the surgery including urinary incontinence, vaginal prolapse, formation of fistula where an abnormal link may form between the bladder and the vagina and finally, persistent pain. Infection, haemorrhage and blood clots may also happen in extreme cases.

Recovery: The female patient will automatically start menopause once this uterus removal procedure has been carried out. Usually, the doctor will ask you to refrain from lifting heavy weights for a few weeks after the surgery and also, to abstain from sex for a while. Most female patients reported complete cure of the problem following this surgery. Also, it is not common to find too many side effects after the surgery.

Tips

  1. Walking after a month. 
  2. Simple streching exercises after a month. 
  3. Plenty of fruits and vegetables in diet
  4. Water intake around 6 to 7 glasses. 
  5. Calcium supplements. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.
2791 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Know Methods Of It!

MBBS, Diploma in Obstetrics & Gyanecology
Gynaecologist, Hyderabad
Hysterectomy - Know Methods Of It!

The surgical procedure that is used for uterus removal of a female patient is known as a hysterectomy. From uterine fibroids to cancer in the uterus, there may be a variety of reasons for carrying out this procedure. Here is everything you need to know about the procedure and recovery.

Causes:

There are a number of reasons for which one may have to undergo a hysterectomy. If uterine fibroids and other kinds of growth are causing severe pelvic pain and bleeding, then it may be required. This also applied to particularly painful endometriosis. Abnormal vaginal bleeding as well as severe and chronic pelvic pain, are enough of reasons by themselves for going in for this kind of surgery to remove the uterus. Also, when the uterus slides away from its normal position and slips into the vaginal canal, this signifies a condition known as Uterine Prolapse, which will also require treatment in the form of a hysterectomy. Andenomyosis is another reason why this surgery may be required, as this condition results in the thickening of the organ. Finally, if the patient is suffering from cervical or ovarian cancer, then the doctor may recommend this surgery to remove the uterus in case the tumour found has been tested as malignant.

Technique:

There are various techniques that may be followed in the course of this surgery, depending on the location, the size and the severity of the condition and the growth that is associated with it. 

  1. Open Surgery Hysterectomy: This involves an incision of six to seven inches, in the belly of the patient so as to act on the abdominal region. After recovery, there will be a visible scar on the stomach of the patient.
  2. MIP Hysterectomy: The various approaches for this technique include vaginal hysterectomy, laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy, and robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy.

Risks:

While this is mostly known as a low-risk procedure, there may be various risks after the surgery including urinary incontinence, vaginal prolapse, formation of fistula where an abnormal link may form between the bladder and the vagina and finally, persistent pain. Infection, haemorrhage and blood clots may also happen in extreme cases.

Recovery:

The female patient will automatically start menopause once this uterus removal procedure has been carried out. Usually, the doctor will ask you to refrain from lifting heavy weights for a few weeks after the surgery and also, to abstain from sex for a while. Most female patients reported complete cure of the problem following this surgery. Also, it is not common to find too many side effects after the surgery.

Tips

  1. Walking after a month. 
  2. Simple stretching exercises after a month. 
  3. Plenty of fruits and vegetables in the diet
  4. Water intake should be around 3-4 liters.
  5. Calcium supplements.
1928 people found this helpful
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