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Interrupted Aortic Arch Tips

What Can Be Done To Manage Foot Arch Pain?

Dr. Shivraj Jadhav 85% (10 ratings)
MBBS, DNB (Orthopedics)
Orthopedist, Navi Mumbai
What Can Be Done To Manage Foot Arch Pain?

Foot arch pain is used in broader context for describing pain in bones, ligaments, muscles and nerve on the foot bottom. Slight damage to any of the components in the foot bottom can cause great pain. For starters, the pain lasts for a brief period, but increases over time if the condition is left untreated. Foot arch pain is more commonly witnessed in people over the age of 60 and among athletes engaged in sports of high impact.
The treatment plan of the pain totally depends on the cause. An early and right diagnosis goes a long way in treating the condition faster. For occasional mild to moderate pain, simple solutions such as footwear change can do the trick. Doctors often suggest four simple methods. This starts with rest followed by applying ice and then trying compression and elevation.

Anti-inflammatory medications are used to treat foot arch pain. Cases that are severe in nature can be treated with steroid and anti-inflammatory injections. For extreme cases, cortisol injections are prescribed too. This is done to relieve pain and release plantar fascia. Even stretching exercises are known to give relief from the pain. Some of the recommended exercises during this period are:

  1. Stretch-related to plantar fascia: This exercise should be performed by crossing the legs at the junction of the knee. The body weight should be rested on the unaffected leg and it should gradually come down to touch the toe. The idea is to stretch the plantar fascia. A set of 20 such movements should be practised on a daily basis. Each movement should last for about 10 seconds.
  2. Foot flexing: This exercise can be practised before getting out of bed. This is the tie when the pain from the plantar fascia is felt the most. This exercise should be repeated 20 times each lasting for about 10 seconds.
  3. Rolling stretch: This exercise should be started by sitting in a chair. A tennis ball should be placed under the foot arch and the same should be rolled back and forth for ten times at a time. The same should be repeated with the second foot. Once this posture gets comfortable, the same should be practised by standing on the ball. It is known to be extremely useful for people suffering from foot arch pain.

How to prevent foot arch pain?
1. Wear shoes that are half an inch lose as they will make feel comfortable while walking
2. Losing weight; obese tends to cause pain in the foot arch
3. Performing free hand exercise and simple stretching on a daily basis
4. Not to overuse the foot. People who stand for more than 5-6 hours at stretch on a daily basis are observed to have foot arch pain.

Foot Arch Pain - How to Deal With It?

Dr. Gurinder Bedi 91% (18 ratings)
CCST(Internal Medicine), FRCS (Orth Surg), FRCS, MS - Orthopaedics, DNB Orthopedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Foot Arch Pain - How to Deal With It?

Foot arch pain is used in broader context for describing pain in bones, ligaments, muscles and nerve on the foot bottom. Slight damage to any of the components in the foot bottom can cause great pain. For starters, the pain lasts for a brief period, but increases over time if the condition is left untreated. Foot arch pain is more commonly witnessed in people over the age of 60 and among athletes engaged in sports of high impact.
The treatment plan of the pain totally depends on the cause. An early and right diagnosis goes a long way in treating the condition faster. For occasional mild to moderate pain, simple solutions such as footwear change can do the trick. Doctors often suggest four simple methods. This starts with rest followed by applying ice and then trying compression and elevation.

Anti-inflammatory medications are used to treat foot arch pain. Cases that are severe in nature can be treated with steroid and anti-inflammatory injections. For extreme cases, cortisol injections are prescribed too. This is done to relieve pain and release plantar fascia. Even stretching exercises are known to give relief from the pain. Some of the recommended exercises during this period are:

  1. Stretch-related to plantar fascia: This exercise should be performed by crossing the legs at the junction of the knee. The body weight should be rested on the unaffected leg and it should gradually come down to touch the toe. The idea is to stretch the plantar fascia. A set of 20 such movements should be practised on a daily basis. Each movement should last for about 10 seconds.
  2. Foot flexing: This exercise can be practised before getting out of bed. This is the tie when the pain from the plantar fascia is felt the most. This exercise should be repeated 20 times each lasting for about 10 seconds.
  3. Rolling stretch: This exercise should be started by sitting in a chair. A tennis ball should be placed under the foot arch and the same should be rolled back and forth for ten times at a time. The same should be repeated with the second foot. Once this posture gets comfortable, the same should be practised by standing on the ball. It is known to be extremely useful for people suffering from foot arch pain.

How to prevent foot arch pain?
1. Wear shoes that are half an inch lose as they will make feel comfortable while walking
2. Losing weight; obese tends to cause pain in the foot arch
3. Performing free hand exercise and simple stretching on a daily basis
4. Not to overuse the foot. People who stand for more than 5-6 hours at stretch on a daily basis are observed to have foot arch pain. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

2418 people found this helpful

Foot Arch Pain - How to Deal With It?

Dr. Senthil Kamalasekaran 90% (127 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Chennai
Foot Arch Pain - How to Deal With It?

Foot arch pain is used in broader context for describing pain in bones, ligaments, muscles and nerve on the foot bottom. Slight damage to any of the components in the foot bottom can cause great pain. For starters, the pain lasts for a brief period, but increases over time if the condition is left untreated. Foot arch pain is more commonly witnessed in people over the age of 60 and among athletes engaged in sports of high impact.
The treatment plan of the pain totally depends on the cause. An early and right diagnosis goes a long way in treating the condition faster. For occasional mild to moderate pain, simple solutions such as footwear change can do the trick. Doctors often suggest four simple methods. This starts with rest followed by applying ice and then trying compression and elevation.

Anti-inflammatory medications are used to treat foot arch pain. Cases that are severe in nature can be treated with steroid and anti-inflammatory injections. This is done to relieve pain and release plantar fascia. Even stretching exercises are known to give relief from the pain. Some of the recommended exercises during this period are:

  1. Stretch-related to plantar fascia: This exercise should be performed by crossing the legs at the junction of the knee. The body weight should be rested on the unaffected leg and it should gradually come down to touch the toe. The idea is to stretch the plantar fascia. A set of 20 such movements should be practised on a daily basis. Each movement should last for about 10 seconds.
  2. Foot flexing: This exercise can be practised before getting out of bed. This is the tie when the pain from the plantar fascia is felt the most. This exercise should be repeated 20 times each lasting for about 10 seconds.
  3. Rolling stretch: This exercise should be started by sitting in a chair. A tennis ball should be placed under the foot arch and the same should be rolled back and forth for ten times at a time. The same should be repeated with the second foot. Once this posture gets comfortable, the same should be practised by standing on the ball. It is known to be extremely useful for people suffering from foot arch pain.

How to prevent foot arch pain?
1. Wear shoes that are half an inch lose as they will make feel comfortable while walking
2. Losing weight; obese tends to cause pain in the foot arch
3. Performing free hand exercise and simple stretching on a daily basis
4. Not to overuse the foot. People who stand for more than 5-6 hours at stretch on a daily basis are observed to have foot arch pain. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

2 people found this helpful

Foot Arch Pain - How To Deal With It?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship in Shoulder Surgery
Orthopedist, Gurgaon
Foot Arch Pain - How To Deal With It?

Plantar fasciitis or foot arch pain is the most widely recognised form of foot ache. The plantar fascia is a belt of the tissue (tendon) that connects your heel to your toes. It supports your foot arch. If you strain your plantar belt, it gets weak, swollen, and inflamed. At that point, your heel or the base of your foot hurts when you stand or walk.

Plantar fasciitis is very common in moderately aged individuals. It also affects young individuals who are on their feet a great deal, like athletes or sportspersons. It can happen in one foot or both feet. Straining the tendon or ligament that supports your arch causes plantar fasciitis. Repeated strain can bring about small tears in the tendon. These can lead to pain and swelling.

  1. No single treatment works best for those suffering from plantar fasciitis. However, there are numerous things you can do to help your foot to improve from this condition. These are as follows:
  2. Try to give your feet a lot of rest. Decrease the type of exercises that can make your foot hurt. Do whatever it takes not to walk or keep running on hard surfaces.
  3. Avoid wearing heels if that is what might be causing the pain. Try to wear shoes with soft soles.
  4. To diminish the pain and swelling, try applying ice on your arch or even heels, in case the pain is caused because of the arch. On the other hand, take an over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever like ibuprofen, (for example, Advil or Motrin) or naproxen, (for example, Aleve).
  5. Do toe stretches, calf stretches and towel extends a few times a day, particularly when you first get up in the morning. (For towel stretches, you pull on both the ends of a towel that you put under the bundle of your foot.) Before doing so, roll the towel into the shape of a band.
  6. Get another pair of shoes. Pick shoes with great curve bolster and a padded sole. On the other hand you can also use heel mugs or shoe inserts (orthotics). Utilize them in both shoes, regardless of the possibility that only one foot hurts.

In case that these medications do not help, your doctor may suggest splints or supports that you can wear during the evening. He or she may also suggest certain shots of medicine, (for example, a steroid) in your heel, or different medicines. Most people will not require surgery. Specialists just propose it for individuals who still have pain even after taking different medicines for six to twelve months.

Plantar fasciitis frequently happens as a result of injuries that have happened after some time. With treatment, you will face less pain within a couple of weeks. However, it may take time for the pain to leave totally. It might take a couple of months to a year. Continue with your treatment. In case that you do not, you may have chronic pain when you stand or walk. The sooner you begin treatment, the sooner your feet feel relief. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Orthopedist.

4670 people found this helpful

How to Prevent Foot Arch Pain?

Dr. Atul Kumar Garg 85% (12 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship In Arthroscopy & Arthroplasty, Advanced Life trauma Support, Diploma In Sports Injuries
Orthopedist, Delhi
How to Prevent Foot Arch Pain?

Foot arch pain is used in broader context for describing pain in bones, ligaments, muscles and nerve on the foot bottom. Slight damage to any of the components in the foot bottom can cause great pain. For starters, the pain lasts for a brief period, but increases over time if the condition is left untreated. Foot arch pain is more commonly witnessed in people over the age of 60 and among athletes engaged in sports of high impact.
The treatment plan of the pain totally depends on the cause. An early and right diagnosis goes a long way in treating the condition faster. For occasional mild to moderate pain, simple solutions such as footwear change can do the trick. Doctors often suggest four simple methods. This starts with rest followed by applying ice and then trying compression and elevation.

Anti-inflammatory medications are used to treat foot arch pain. Cases that are severe in nature can be treated with steroid and anti-inflammatory injections. For extreme cases, cortisol injections are prescribed too. This is done to relieve pain and release plantar fascia. Even stretching exercises are known to give relief from the pain. Some of the recommended exercises during this period are:

  1. Stretch-related to plantar fascia: This exercise should be performed by crossing the legs at the junction of the knee. The body weight should be rested on the unaffected leg and it should gradually come down to touch the toe. The idea is to stretch the plantar fascia. A set of 20 such movements should be practised on a daily basis. Each movement should last for about 10 seconds.
  2. Foot flexing: This exercise can be practised before getting out of bed. This is the tie when the pain from the plantar fascia is felt the most. This exercise should be repeated 20 times each lasting for about 10 seconds.
  3. Rolling stretch: This exercise should be started by sitting in a chair. A tennis ball should be placed under the foot arch and the same should be rolled back and forth for ten times at a time. The same should be repeated with the second foot. Once this posture gets comfortable, the same should be practised by standing on the ball. It is known to be extremely useful for people suffering from foot arch pain.

How to prevent foot arch pain?
1. Wear shoes that are half an inch lose as they will make feel comfortable while walking
2. Losing weight; obese tends to cause pain in the foot arch
3. Performing free hand exercise and simple stretching on a daily basis
4. Not to overuse the foot. People who stand for more than 5-6 hours at stretch on a daily basis are observed to have foot arch pain.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4854 people found this helpful

How Can Aortic Valve Stenosis Be Treated?

Dr. Rajiv Kumar Srivastava 88% (135 ratings)
M.Ch - Cardio Thoracic Surgery, MS - General Surgery, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
Cardiologist, Durgapur
How Can Aortic Valve Stenosis Be Treated?

The heart is a wonderfully designed pump that takes care of proper functioning of the body. There are two separate channels, through which pure and impure blood flows through. Blood flow in these two designated networks is one-sided completely and controlled by valves. There are 2 sets of valves as below:

  1. Aortic and pulmonary valves which controls blood flow from the ventricles to the aorta and to the lungs respectively
  2. The mitral and tricuspid valves control blood flow from the atria (upper chambers) to the ventricles (lower chambers).

These valves are meant to be elastic and fibrous and open and close freely to allow for blood flow. Due to various reasons, they can become stenosed (hard and narrow) and depending on which valve is affected, complications arise accordingly.

The aortic valve is extremely important in that its proper functioning ensures that pure, oxygenated blood reaches various parts of the body. Due to various reasons, this valve may not open and/or close properly. Some causes include calcium deposits, advanced age, rheumatic fever, endocarditis, etc. With age or deposits, the valve opening can become narrow and reduce the amount of blood flowing into the aorta. The following symptoms and complications arise out of this.

  1. The heart needs to put extra pressure to pump out blood into the aorta
  2. The left ventricle therefore grows thicker
  3. The symptoms will take a long time to manifest, as the heart will work on alternate measures, but after a certain point, symptoms will show up including chest pain, fatigue with minimal exertion, shortness of breath, and racing heartbeats.
  4. As the heart has its own compensating mechanisms, symptoms show up when the condition is much serious. Therefore, onset of these symptoms requires immediate medical attention.

Diagnosis: This could be diagnosed with routine medical exam when the heart is being checked or it could only be diagnosed when the symptoms are seen as above. Treatment is easier in the earlier case, and requires more rigorous attention.

Management: If the stenosis is mild and was detected on routine exam, then it needs to be monitored periodically. Surgery is usually not done, unless it is very severe. However, preventive measures can be taken including

  1. Avoiding over-exertion
  2. Heart-healthy diet can be taken to prevent further damage
  3. Reduce sodium intake
  4. Quit smoking

If the stenosis is severe, then surgery is the only definitive treatment measure. Valve surgery can be either a

  1. Balloon valvuloplasty – the valve opening is enlarged
  2. Replacement – valve replacement is usually done as an open heart surgery.

Though aortic stenosis is a serious condition, it is also rare and can be managed by adopting an overall healthy lifestyle.

3516 people found this helpful

How To Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis?

Dr. Nishith Chandra 91% (695 ratings)
DM Cardiology
Cardiologist, Delhi
How To Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis?

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice.

3589 people found this helpful

Maintaining a Safe Lumbar Arch in Back Pain!

Dr. Vishwas Virmani 91% (22667 ratings)
MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
Maintaining a Safe Lumbar Arch in Back Pain!

Maintaining a Safe Lumbar Arch

  • When swabbing, hold the mop close to your body, and avoid bending at the waist. Stiffen your core and move your pelvis and ribs together. Do not rotate by twisting the spine.
  • Using props, armrests, and desks for reading can help to minimize bending while sitting.
  • Sitting in a flexed posture places increased pressure on the lumbar disc..Chiropractic Management

Balancing Loads-

  • Minimize and balance your loads. Even if you maintain an ideal posture and lift correctly, the weight you lift may contribute to the pressure within the disc and cause further herniation of a disc. If you do not need to lift during the healing period of your disc injury, do not lift.
  • How to stand up from sitting position-
  • When rising from a seated position, avoid curling your spine forward. Rising in this manner can cause continual re-injury to the discs throughout the day.
  • The preferred way to rise is to maintain a normal curve in your lower back, keep your chest out, and brace your abdominal muscles. Scoot to the edge of the chair so that your legs are under you and do most of the lifting. This one ADL (Activity of Daily Living) modification has been accountable for the reduction of symptoms in many chronic disc herniations.
2 people found this helpful

4 Ways To Prevent Foot Arch Pain!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Coimbatore
4 Ways To Prevent Foot Arch Pain!

Foot arch pain is used in broader context for describing pain in bones, ligaments, muscles and nerve on the foot bottom. Slight damage to any of the components in the foot bottom can cause great pain. For starters, the pain lasts for a brief period, but increases over time if the condition is left untreated. Foot arch pain is more commonly witnessed in people over the age of 60 and among athletes engaged in sports of high impact.
The treatment plan of the pain totally depends on the cause. An early and right diagnosis goes a long way in treating the condition faster. For occasional mild to moderate pain, simple solutions such as footwear change can do the trick. Doctors often suggest four simple methods. This starts with rest followed by applying ice and then trying compression and elevation.

Anti-inflammatory medications are used to treat foot arch pain. Cases that are severe in nature can be treated with steroid and anti-inflammatory injections. For extreme cases, cortisol injections are prescribed too. This is done to relieve pain and release plantar fascia. Even stretching exercises are known to give relief from the pain. Some of the recommended exercises during this period are:

  1. Stretch-related to plantar fascia: This exercise should be performed by crossing the legs at the junction of the knee. The body weight should be rested on the unaffected leg and it should gradually come down to touch the toe. The idea is to stretch the plantar fascia. A set of 20 such movements should be practised on a daily basis. Each movement should last for about 10 seconds.
  2. Foot flexing: This exercise can be practised before getting out of bed. This is the tie when the pain from the plantar fascia is felt the most. This exercise should be repeated 20 times each lasting for about 10 seconds.
  3. Rolling stretch: This exercise should be started by sitting in a chair. A tennis ball should be placed under the foot arch and the same should be rolled back and forth for ten times at a time. The same should be repeated with the second foot. Once this posture gets comfortable, the same should be practised by standing on the ball. It is known to be extremely useful for people suffering from foot arch pain.

How to prevent foot arch pain?
1. Wear shoes that are half an inch lose as they will make feel comfortable while walking
2. Losing weight; obese tends to cause pain in the foot arch
3. Performing free hand exercise and simple stretching on a daily basis
4. Not to overuse the foot. People who stand for more than 5-6 hours at stretch on a daily basis are observed to have foot arch pain. 

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4146 people found this helpful

Aortic Valve Stenosis: Tests and Diagnosis

Dr. Sunil Beniwal 90% (55 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, DM - Cardiology
Cardiologist, Jaipur
Aortic Valve Stenosis: Tests and Diagnosis

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion. Exercise test may be contraindicated in severe AS. MRI and X ray not much helpful to diagnose AS. 

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. CT is helpful in planning for nonsurgical valve replacement. Cardiac Catheterisation is usually needed prior to surgery.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2764 people found this helpful
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