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Hysterectomy Tips

Hysterectomy - 10 Things You Did Not Know!

Motherhood 88% (259 ratings)
Speciality Birthing Care
Gynaecologist, Bangalore
Hysterectomy - 10 Things You Did Not Know!

Hysterectomy is a procedure that is used to treat a wide variety of conditions. A partial hysterectomy is performed for the removal of the uterus whereas a myomectomy is performed for the removal of the fibroids. A complete hysterectomy is performed in order to remove the uterus and the cervix. With hysterectomy, there comes some critical and sensitive topic that needs to be discussed with the surgeon. Here is a list of top 10 things that need to be known about hysterectomy:

  1. The sex life concern: Unlike common apprehension, hysterectomy doesn’t necessarily mean the end of sex life. In the worst case scenario where the cervix is removed, it takes around 6 weeks before one can resume the sex life.
  2. Hysterectomy can’t cure endometriosis: Endometriosis is a condition that is characterised by menstrual cramp, painful intercourse and chronic pain. Hysterectomy is not the first line of treatment for a condition like this. If any doctor has suggested it, it makes sense to take a second opinion.
  3. Hysterectomy doesn’t mean menopause: This procedure doesn’t mean a menopause or an inability to get pregnant. There are certain other misconceptions such as getting night sweats, hot flashes and menstrual cramp etc. On the contrary, a well-performed procedure will ensure that a person doesn’t feel a thing after the surgery.
  4. The loss in ovaries: Depending on the condition of a patient, a doctor might remove the fallopian tube, uterus and ovaries. It necessarily means a sudden loss of oestrogen and progesterone hormone abruptly. Both this hormone are critical for bone and sexual health. It might also lead to menopause, decreased urge in sex and hot flashes during the night. It is therefore very important to discuss each and every aspect of the procedure before the surgery begins.
  5. Hormonal therapy: Since the removal of ovaries is likely to cause physical discomfort to the body, hormonal therapy can come to the rescue of an individual. Hormonal therapy can curtail the risk of blood clot formation, heart diseases, stroke etc.
  6. Explore other non-surgical options: Hysterectomy is not the last word for any uterus or ovary related problems. The goal is to keep the uterus intact. There are certain less evasive procedures to save ovaries and uterus. This is where multiple opinions come handy.
  7. Less invasive options: There exist less invasive surgeries for treatment related to uterus and ovaries. For instance, a robotic hysterectomy causes far less pain as compared to traditional procedure. It also ensures less loss of blood from the system resulting in less weakness.
  8. The morcellation technique: In case a uterus has to be removed, doctors these days use a process known as morcellation. The latter involves making small cuts into various places of the uterus in order to bring it out. The false apprehension of this process causing cancer cells in the body is not true. Only if a patient is suffering from a particular kind of cancer, it might spread to other parts of the body. A doctor has to be consulted to assure such a thing doesn’t happen.
  9. Cancer apprehension: For people facing a gene defect such as BRAC1 and BRAC2 hysterectomy can reduce the chance of ovarian cancer by a good 80 percent.
  10. Physiological healing post hysterectomy: Although physical healing takes no more than 6 weeks after the procedure, the emotional healing might take some time. It makes sense to seek professional help for postoperative depression.
5506 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy Surgery - Why Is This Surgery Carried Out?

Dr. Saraschandrika P. V. 90% (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Hyderabad
Hysterectomy Surgery - Why Is This Surgery Carried Out?

What is a hysterectomy? This is a surgery that is used to remove the ovaries or even the uterus. This surgery is usually conducted in order to deal with the extreme conditions that may be caused by the severe onset of various conditions related to the reproductive system of women. Read on to find out why this surgery carried out and what are the after effects?

Causes: This surgery can be carried out for a variety of reasons. One of the main reason is the manifestation of uterine fibroids that can cause severe pain and bleeding. These fibroids will have to be removed surgically and in case they have spread, the uterus will have to be removed entirely. Also, if the condition has spread to the ovaries, it may be imperative to remove the ovaries as well. Furthermore, if the patient is suffering from endometriosis, where the tissue has spread too much and cannot be contained merely by medication or other forms of treatment, then the doctor will have to conduct a hysterectomy surgery in order to remove the affected areas of the reproductive area. Also, other conditions for which this surgery may be required include adenomyosis, chronic pain in the pelvic area, cancer of the uterus, cervical cancer and uterine prolapse.

Procedure: A hysterectomy is performed under anesthesia, and the doctor makes a five to seven inch incision in the abdomen for an open surgery. The doctor will then continue to remove the uterus through this incision. Also, usually, the patient will have to spend about three to four days in the hospital following this surgery. A vaginal hysterectomy may also be conducted for certain cases, depending on the type and severity of the condition that has led to this form of treatment. For this kind of surgery, the incisions will be made in the vaginal area.

After effects: Starting from hormonal imbalances to early menopause, this surgery can leave significant after effects in its trail. The patients who have been through this surgery will be asked to abstain from heavy physical work that involves lifting heavy objects and bending. Also, the doctor will recommend abstinence from sex. One will have to avoid these things for a period of at least six weeks after the surgery. In many cases, the patient may also go through heavy menstrual bleeding.

Doctor visits: In case the bleeding and hot flashes are excessive, then the patient will have to see a doctor and take further appointments so that the condition may not reoccur. Also, the doctor will usually prescribe supplements like vitamins, which must be taken on a regular basis after the surgery to avoid any complications at a later date.

3664 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - What Is It?

Dr. Amol Lunkad 84% (14 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Pune
Hysterectomy - What Is It?

What is a hysterectomy and why do you need it?

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the uterus, which is a muscular organ that carries and nourishes the baby during pregnancy. This surgery may be done to remove all or parts of the uterus; if there are any associated problems in fallopian tubes/ ovaries, they may also be removed simultaneously, during hysterectomy.

Types of hysterectomy procedures

Hysterectomy may be done through surgical cuts in the belly, known as abdominal hysterectomy or through vaginal hysterectomy where the uterus is removed through the vagina. Majority of the hysterectomies are now done with laproscope, due to the advantage of faster recovery. Which procedure is chosen will depend on why the hysterectomy is being performed along with the medical history of the patient.

Depending on the reason of the surgery, removal of the whole uterus or just parts of it may be required. The types of surgery are:

  • Partial hysterectomy is the removal of just the uterus while keeping the cervix in place
  • Total hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus and cervix
  • Radical hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, lymph nodes, cervix and the upper part of the vagina, and is generally only advised in cases of cancer
  • Oophorectomy is the removal of ovaries and it may be done with a hysterectomy

Why is it needed?

There may be many reasons to have a hysterectomy and some of them include:

Heavy periods

These may be very uncomfortable and painful, sometimes caused by other diseases. A hysterectomy may be opted for when all other treatments have failed to treat this condition.

Fibroids

They are non-malignant tumors in the uterus that cause constant bleeding, anemia and pelvic pain along with bladder pressure. They may also cause very heavy periods.

Endometriosis

It is a condition where the tissue lining the uterus also grows on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or pelvic or abdominal organs. It causes severe abdominal pain, heavy periods and sometimes even infertility.

Uterine prolapse

When the tissues and ligaments supporting the uterus become weak, the uterus may slip down from its normal position and descend into the vagina. It can result in urinary incontinence (leakage of urine), pressure in the pelvis and problems in bowel movements.

Cancer of the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tube, cervix or the lining of the uterus (endometrium)

A hysterectomy may be recommended for these types of cancers. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4091 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Know More About It!

Dr. Vandana Gupta 86% (24 ratings)
MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Hysterectomy - Know More About It!

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a woman's uterus. The uterus, also known as the womb, is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The uterine lining is the source of menstrual blood.

You may need a hysterectomy for many reasons. The surgery can be used to treat a number of chronic pain conditions as well as certain types of cancer and infections.

A woman may have a hysterectomy for different reasons, including:

  1. Uterine fibroids that cause pain, bleeding, or other problems
  2. Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its normal position into the vaginal canal
  3. Cancer of the uterus, cervix, or ovaries
  4. Endometriosis
  5. Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  6. Chronic pelvic pain
  7. Adenomyosis, or a thickening of the uterus

Hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons is usually considered only after all other treatment approaches have been tried without success.

Types of Hysterectomy-

Depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, a surgeon may choose to remove all or only part of the uterus. Patients and health care providers sometimes use these terms inexactly, so it is important to clarify if the cervix and/or ovaries are removed:

  • In partial or supracervical hysterectomy, the upper portion of the uterus is removed, leaving the cervix intact.
  • Complete or total hysterectomy involves the removal of both the uterus and the cervix. This is the most common type of hysterectomy performed.
  • Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the removal of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.
  • Radical hysterectomy is an extensive surgical procedure in which the uterus, cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, upper vagina, some surrounding tissue, and lymph nodes are removed.

Hysterectomy Surgical Procedures-

Traditionally, hysterectomies have been performed using a technique known as total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). However, in recent years, two less-invasive procedures have been developed: Vaginal hysterectomy and Laparoscopic hysterectomy:

  1. Total Abdominal Hysterectomy (TAH): In a total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), the surgeon makes an incision approximately five inches long in the abdominal wall, cutting through skin and connective tissue to reach the uterus. This type of surgery is especially useful if there are large fibroids or if cancer is suspected. Disadvantages include more pain and a longer recovery time than other procedures, and a larger scar.
  2. Vaginal Hysterectomy: A vaginal hysterectomy is done through a small incision at the top of the vagina. Through the incision, the uterus (and cervix, if necessary) is separated from its connecting tissue and blood supply and removed through the vagina. This procedure is often used for conditions such as uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy heals faster than abdominal hysterectomy, results in less pain, and generally does not cause external scarring.
  3. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: During a laparoscopic hysterectomy, your doctor uses a tiny instrument called a laparoscope. A laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera at the front. The instrument is inserted through incisions in the abdomen. Three or four small incisions are made instead of one large incision. Once the surgeon can see your uterus, they will cut the uterus into small pieces and remove one piece at a time.

A hysterectomy is a major decision that you should take after careful consultation with your doctor. You should understand the reason for the operation, the benefits and risks and the alternatives to a hysterectomy. If you are unsure, discuss the issue with your doctor or obtain a second opinion.  In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3427 people found this helpful

Emerging Conservative Alternatives To Hysterectomy: What You Need To Know?

Dr. Shilpa Dhameja 91% (381 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Diploma In Gynaecology & Obstetrics, DNB - Obstetrics & Gynecology, Felloship In Minimal Access & Surgery
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Emerging Conservative Alternatives To Hysterectomy: What You Need To Know?

Like most things in life, the uterus also has both good and bad sides to it. It is a symbol of womanhood and also carries the developing baby. The bad side is that it brings with it (and its appendages) many problems including dysfunctional uterine bleeding, endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, uterovaginal prolapse, adenomyosis, a pelvic pain of unknown origin, cancer of the uterine cavity and other obstetric complications.

Hysterectomy is one of the most commonly performed procedures and ensures complete relief from these symptoms. There are however, multiple procedures, which can be used to manage these conditions without having to resort to removal of the uterus. This can help in preventing complications from hysterectomy including prolonged recovery, infertility in women of childbearing age and loss of womanhood.

Read on to know some of the emerging conservative alternatives to hysterectomy:

Myomectomy: Where there are fibroids, which are in the smooth muscles of the uterus and show symptoms like pain and discomfort. In these, it is advisable to go for a myomectomy. This removes only the fibroid, leaving the uterus in place. It can be done in one of the 3 ways traditional surgical process through an incision; laparoscopically through minute incisions; and then through vagina. In all these, only the fibroid is removed and sent for biopsy to confirm it is benign. It is less invasive, requires less recovery time and helps retain the uterus.

Uterine endometrial ablation: In cases of dysfunctional uterine bleeding or menorrhagia with no fibroids, the lining of the uterus could require removal. In these women, thermal balloon ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation can be used. A small amount of extreme heat or cold or radio frequency waves are used to remove the uterine lining, thereby managing symptoms.

Uterine artery embolization: In women with fibroids, the feeding arteries could be cauterised to ensure blood supply is stopped so that fibroid growth is stopped. With very promising success rates, this is gaining popularity as a conservative method.

Laparoscopy and endometriosis excision: In endometriosis, where the uterine tissue is growing in areas outside the uterus, it could be removed laparoscopically after identifying the area of growth on ultrasound and laparoscopy.

Vaginal pessary: In women with uterine prolapse, the uterus drops from its normal position, pushing against the vaginal walls. This can be due to vaginal childbirth, age, smoking and obesity. Vaginal pessary is where a removable device is placed into the vagina to prevent it from falling down. It is a temporary solution, but very useful in holding the uterus in place and relieve symptoms partially or completely.

In all these, medical management (painkillers and hormone replacement), stress and weight management, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol are also essential. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2767 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy- How Does It Help You?

Dr. Pallavi Dhawan 88% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Lucknow
Hysterectomy- How Does It Help You?

Hysterectomy is a procedure that is used to treat a wide variety of conditions. A partial hysterectomy is performed for the removal of the uterus whereas a myomectomy is performed for the removal of the fibroids. A complete hysterectomy is performed in order to remove the uterus and the cervix. With hysterectomy, there comes some critical and sensitive topic that needs to be discussed with the surgeon. Here is a list of top 10 things that need to be known about hysterectomy:

  1. The sex life concern: Unlike common apprehension, hysterectomy doesn’t necessarily mean the end of sex life. In the worst case scenario where the cervix is removed, it takes around 6 weeks before one can resume the sex life.
  2. Hysterectomy can’t cure endometriosis: Endometriosis is a condition that is characterised by menstrual cramp, painful intercourse and chronic pain. Hysterectomy is not the first line of treatment for a condition like this. If any doctor has suggested it, it makes sense to take a second opinion.
  3. Hysterectomy doesn’t mean menopause: This procedure doesn’t mean a menopause or an inability to get pregnant. There are certain other misconceptions such as getting night sweats, hot flashes and menstrual cramp etc. On the contrary, a well-performed procedure will ensure that a person doesn’t feel a thing after the surgery.
  4. The loss in ovaries: Depending on the condition of a patient, a doctor might remove the fallopian tube, uterus and ovaries. It necessarily means a sudden loss of oestrogen and progesterone hormone abruptly. Both this hormone are critical for bone and sexual health. It might also lead to menopause, decreased urge in sex and hot flashes during the night. It is therefore very important to discuss each and every aspect of the procedure before the surgery begins.
  5. Hormonal therapy: Since the removal of ovaries is likely to cause physical discomfort to the body, hormonal therapy can come to the rescue of an individual. Hormonal therapy can curtail the risk of blood clot formation, heart diseases, stroke etc.
  6. Explore other non-surgical options: Hysterectomy is not the last word for any uterus or ovary related problems. The goal is to keep the uterus intact. There are certain less evasive procedures to save ovaries and uterus. This is where multiple opinions come handy.
  7. Less invasive options: There exist less invasive surgeries for treatment related to uterus and ovaries. For instance, a robotic hysterectomy causes far less pain as compared to traditional procedure. It also ensures less loss of blood from the system resulting in less weakness.
  8. The morcellation technique: In case a uterus has to be removed, doctors these days use a process known as morcellation. The latter involves making small cuts into various places of the uterus in order to bring it out. The false apprehension of this process causing cancer cells in the body is not true. Only if a patient is suffering from a particular kind of cancer, it might spread to other parts of the body. A doctor has to be consulted to assure such a thing doesn’t happen.
  9. Cancer apprehension: For people facing a gene defect such as BRAC1 and BRAC2 hysterectomy can reduce the chance of ovarian cancer by a good 80 percent.
  10. Physiological healing post hysterectomy: Although physical healing takes no more than 6 weeks after the procedure, the emotional healing might take some time. It makes sense to seek professional help for postoperative depression.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2453 people found this helpful

Uterine Fibroids & Interesting Facts About Them!

Dr. Anu Sidana 89% (56 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, DGO, DNB - Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
Uterine Fibroids & Interesting Facts About Them!

Uterine fibroids are abnormal growth that manifests in the uterus of the woman. Hormones and a family history of the same are the usual causes listed for such a growth. As per many medical reports, about 70 to 80% women over the age of 50 years, experience such growths. The most common symptoms of the condition include heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle or even at other times of the month, as well as severe pain in the abdomen.

Read on to know eight facts about these fibroids.

  1. These fibroids may be caused by a family history of the same and is usually passed down by the mother. The other causes include excessive hormonal imbalance and changes as well as pregnancy and obesity.
  2. Heavy urination is one of the most common symptoms of this condition, as the fibroids may press against the uterus and cause pressure in the area. Also, for those who have not reached menopause yet, this condition may also cause heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding.
  3. A Pelvic MRI scan is one of the most common ways of diagnosing the condition with the creation of images that will show any anomalies and growth in the uterus, ovaries and cervix.
  4. Medication may be used in order to control and regulate the levels of hormone production and release. This can affect the fibroids by making them shrink eventually.
  5. All fibroids do not point at the progression of cancer. If you have uterine fibroids, it does not mean that you have to have cancer. The symptoms may be similar and the condition is usually called uterine sarcoma. Usually, the diagnosis can only be done with the help of a sugary which will remove the growth and then study the same in the lab to find whether or not it is malignant. This process is known as a biopsy.
  6. They are the most common reason behind undergoing a hysterectomy. Many women, the world over, have to go through a hysterectomy, which removes the uterus and even the ovaries in some cases. This usually happens when the uterine fibroids become too huge to handle and may give rise to a variety of risks and complications.
  7. Pregnancy may become a difficulty if you happen to have uterine fibroids. While it is still possible to become pregnant and conceive naturally, many women face problems in doing so easily because these fibroids cause changes in the uterus when it comes to the shape and size of the same.
  8. Many women do not experience any symptoms of the condition at all. In such cases, no treatment will be required. Yet, even in these cases, the doctor will recommend regular clinical check ups and observation in order to ensure that there are no complications.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4040 people found this helpful

Hysterectomy - Alternatives Available For It!

Dr. Pragnesh Shah 87% (121 ratings)
MD, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Ahmedabad
Hysterectomy - Alternatives Available For It!

Like most things in life, the uterus also has both good and bad sides to it. It is a symbol of womanhood and also carries the developing baby. The bad side is that it brings with it (and its appendages) many problems including dysfunctional uterine bleeding, endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, uterovaginal prolapse, adenomyosis, a pelvic pain of unknown origin, cancer of the uterine cavity and other obstetric complications.

Hysterectomy is one of the most commonly performed procedures and ensures complete relief from these symptoms. There are however, multiple procedures, which can be used to manage these conditions without having to resort to removal of the uterus. This can help in preventing complications from hysterectomy including prolonged recovery, infertility in women of childbearing age and loss of womanhood.

Read on to know some of the emerging conservative alternatives to hysterectomy:

Myomectomy: Where there are fibroids, which are in the smooth muscles of the uterus and show symptoms like pain and discomfort. In these, it is advisable to go for a myomectomy. This removes only the fibroid, leaving the uterus in place. It can be done in one of the 3 ways traditional surgical process through an incision; laparoscopically through minute incisions; and then through vagina. In all these, only the fibroid is removed and sent for biopsy to confirm it is benign. It is less invasive, requires less recovery time and helps retain the uterus.

Uterine endometrial ablation: In cases of dysfunctional uterine bleeding or menorrhagia with no fibroids, the lining of the uterus could require removal. In these women, thermal balloon ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation can be used. A small amount of extreme heat or cold or radio frequency waves are used to remove the uterine lining, thereby managing symptoms.

Uterine artery embolization: In women with fibroids, the feeding arteries could be cauterised to ensure blood supply is stopped so that fibroid growth is stopped. With very promising success rates, this is gaining popularity as a conservative method.

Laparoscopy and endometriosis excision: In endometriosis, where the uterine tissue is growing in areas outside the uterus, it could be removed laparoscopically after identifying the area of growth on ultrasound and laparoscopy.

Vaginal pessary: In women with uterine prolapse, the uterus drops from its normal position, pushing against the vaginal walls. This can be due to vaginal childbirth, age, smoking and obesity. Vaginal pessary is where a removable device is placed into the vagina to prevent it from falling down. It is a temporary solution, but very useful in holding the uterus in place and relieve symptoms partially or completely.

In all these, medical management (painkillers and hormone replacement), stress and weight management, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol are also essential.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3516 people found this helpful

8 Types Of Abdominal And Pelvic Surgical Incisions!

Dr. Ajay Gupta 92% (224 ratings)
FIAGES, FMAS, MS - General Surgery
General Surgeon, Pune
8 Types Of Abdominal And Pelvic Surgical Incisions!

At the time of a surgical procedure, while making an incision a doctor has to take care of a number of factors before making an incision. Considering a number of factors, different types of incisions have come into fore, such as 

  1. Midline Incision: It’s the commonest incision and is done along the linea alba (fibrous structure running through the mid of the abdomen). These are preferred, especially in diagnostic laparotomy as it permits a wide access to the abdomen.
  2. Pfannenstiel Incision: It is transverse in nature, extending from the umbilicus to the pubic-symphysis. It is generally employed for abdominal hysterectomy of benign nature and caesarean section.
  3. Chevron Incision: It is an incision under the rib-cage and is done on the abdomen. It starts from beneath the ribs on the right abdomen and extends till the other mid axillary line. Thus, the entire abdominal width is incised for proper reach into the liver. The incision can be up to 2 feet.
  4. Kustner Incision: It is transverse in nature and extends from the symphysis pubis till the iliac spine (anterior). This type of incision takes time to perform. A Pfannenstiel incision offers more exposure than a Kustner incision.
  5. Lanz Incision: It is a variation of the more common mcburney-incision (also known as Gridiron’s incision). It is generally used for open appendectomies. There are quite a few variations for this type of an incision.
  6. Gridiron’s incision: It is done for appendectomies. It is an oblique short incision which is done in the lower right quadrant in the abdomen.
  7. Kocher’s Incision: It is oblique in nature, extending from the abdominal upper right quadrant and is generally used for performing an open cholecystectomy. Gallbladder, biliary tract and certain liver operations can be suited for a Kocher’s incision. This however is different from the same named incision used for the thyroid gland surgery.
  8. Cherney Incision: It is transverse in nature. It allows a great range of exposure for the pelvic sidewall. It is less painful than a midline incision. It allows for the greatest pelvic exposure and hence is a widely preferred and practiced incision.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2989 people found this helpful

Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding - How To Deal With It?

Dr. Prof. & Hod Ganesh Shinde 89% (291 ratings)
MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding - How To Deal With It?

As a woman goes through life, her hormonal levels change quite dramatically and this can be quite impactful. However, sometimes the impact is not a good one! This can be said to be the cause when it comes to dysfunctional uterine bleeding. This sort of bleeding occurs when the levels the hormones are at cause the menstrual cycle of the woman to become erratic.

Understanding the Diagnosis
When it comes to the diagnosis of an issue such as this, the process must include the ruling out of other more serious problems such as fibroids, a miscarriage, or even cancer which has affected the cervix or the uterus of the woman.

Treatment options
A doctor, post-ruling out these situations, will inform the patient, if dysfunctional uterine bleeding is what is being experienced. When it comes to the matter of how dysfunctional uterine bleeding is to be dealt with, it can be said that the best thing which is to be done is to sit down with the doctor and have a comprehensive chat with respect to what the solutions which are available at hand are.

  1. One of these solutions happens to be hormone treatment. However, it is to be kept in mind that this is usually only made use of in order to stop dysfunctional uterine bleeding which is very severe.
  2. If the woman is not experiencing bleeding which is this bad, a good solution could be non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are also known by their abbreviation, which is NSAIDs. Drugs such as ibuprofen are used quite widely when it comes to treating the issue of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. That being said, the matter of the best solution is something which is very subjective and the best judge of the same is only the doctor who has been apprised of all the facts which pertain to the case at hand.
  3. It is only in extreme cases that the uterus as a whole is removed, a process which goes by the name of hysterectomy. This sort of solution is only recommended when a woman does not wish to have any more children.
  4. If a woman who has been experiencing the problem of dysfunctional uterine bleeding is aged between the years of 19 and 39, a good and apt solution would be a combination of low dose hormonal contraceptive treatment along with progestin therapy.

A dysfunctional uterine bleeding is something which can mar a woman’s daily life, but it really needs not be the case!

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2553 people found this helpful
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