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Hyperactivity Tips

Hyperactive Child - Know More!

Hyperactive Child - Know More!

We often see some children are hyperactive. All of them does not suffer from attention deficit hyperactive disorder. But if you see that their academic carrier is getting spoiled or getting self-injury frequently you may contact the doctor for further evaluation. Don't delay.

ADHD - What Are The Symptoms Of It?

ADHD - What Are The Symptoms Of It?

If you have noticed your child to be restless and anxious all the time, it might look cute as the child is highly energetic, but it could be a cause for concern at the same time. It is not normal and the child could be having ADHD that is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. As the name suggests, it is a disorder with deficiency of attention and in which the child is always hyperactive.

ADHD is a disorder in which the symptoms usually show up before the age of seven. It is characterized by a group of behavioral symptoms that include inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. The impact of these symptoms is felt extensively where his overall self-esteem is affected, be it at home, preschool or school, academics or extracurricular activities and in interpersonal relationships.

The most common symptoms, which are almost diagnostic of ADHD are:

  1. Inability to hold attention: The child's attention span is very short and it is very difficult to keep them engaged on one particular thing.
  2. Increased restlessness: The child would be extremely restless and gets distracted easily.
  3. Fidgeting: The child would be seen constantly fidgeting with his fingers.

The following are the less common ones:

  1. Learning disability is rare, but can happen. However, the good news is that it does not affect the child's intelligence.
  2. Sleep disorders
  3. Difficulty in following directions
  4. Poor executive functioning skills
  5. Disorganization, which can lead to poor motor coordination and impaired movements
  6. ADHD kids tend to forget things very easily and need help with coordinating movements
  7. The child suffering from ADHD could easily tire and/or feel lethargic with very low energy levels. This can lead to the child procrastinating things and not wanting to do things on priority basis
  8. These children also have difficulties with fine motor and cognitive skills and so there is delay in their overall participation in games.

While these are the pressing symptoms of ADHD, occupational therapy can play a significant role in managing the child in the following ways. As a first step, the caregiver should have a detailed discussion with the school staff and any other people with whom the child interacts significantly.

This will help identify areas that need support from an Occupational Therapy, which are the following:

  1. Support with gross and/or fine motor skills
  2. Support with improving handwriting
  3. Support with engaging in playing sports and games
  4. Support in engaging in social activities
  5. Improving sensory processing difficulties
  6. Improving visual perception
  7. Support in adapting to the environment
  8. Teaching strategies to participate in various social and academic activities

So, while an ADHD child is definitely a cause for concern, proper support from family can help manage the condition.

ADHD In Child - Know The Parenting Tips!

ADHD In Child - Know The Parenting Tips!

ADHD is one of the commonest behavioral disorders that are found in mostly school-going kids. In fact, this kind of trouble might affect kid's ability quite adversely. There are a few signs with the help of which ADHD in kids can be easily detected, and some of the commonest ones are emotional turmoil, unfinished tasks, squirm and fidget, low focus careless mistakes and other related ones. 
Both interpersonal relationship and schooling success can be hampered to a great extent with this kind of mental disorder. This is why the kids facing the mentioned signs need to be thoroughly diagnosed medically so that the doctors can recommend best treatments that can provide the fastest recovery and that too safely and easily. 

Best tips for tackling ADHD in kids - 

1. Setting behavior limits - If you make your kids learn how to lead a disciplined life, then appropriate behavioral limits are established. The arrogant child is mostly exposed to ADHD. 

2. Staying calm - Child anger should be efficiently controlled otherwise. ADHD cannot be cured. If the kids remain calm and quiet, then only their concentration level will increase, and they can show productive outcomes. 

3. Setting pressure-free structure - Sensible routines and scheduled charts are to be prepared so that unwanted risks can be easily avoided. If the kids are under tremendous pressure, then they might face different kinds of behavioral troubles. 

4. Allow kids to make wise choices - If you let your kids free, then only they will be able to take the right decisions. Kids with a cool mind can make wise decisions that are very much appropriate for upgrading their performances. 

5. Advocating child - Child advocating is highly needed for maintaining a good and healthy balance. But too much strictness should be avoided so that your kids' behavior can be controlled with ease.  This should be done either by parents or tutors so that they can choose the best direction in life. 

6. Avoid muting any headstrong child - Communicate with your child so that a proper interaction can be maintained. If your child remains silent for too long, then they might face different behavioral troubles. 

7. Acquiring knowledge about ADHD - Both parents and kids should have equal knowledge about ADHD and then only the probable signs can be easily avoided, and the necessary treatments can be known. 

8. Being persistent - Persistent behavior is to be maintained, and if you find any deviation in your kids, then you should take them to a doctor.

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - An Overview!

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - An Overview!

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a brain disorder marked by an ongoing pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development.

 

  • Inattention means a person wanders off task, lacks persistence, has difficulty sustaining focus, and is disorganized; and these problems are not due to defiance or lack of comprehension.
  • Hyperactivity means a person seems to move about constantly, including in situations in which it is not appropriate; or excessively fidgets, taps, or talks. In adults, it may be extreme restlessness or wearing others out with constant activity.
  • Impulsivity means a person makes hasty actions that occur in the moment without first thinking about them and that may have high potential for harm; or a desire for immediate rewards or inability to delay gratification. An impulsive person may be socially intrusive and excessively interrupt others or make important decisions without considering the long-term consequences.

 

Signs and Symptoms -

Inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity are the key behaviours of ADHD. Some people with ADHD only have problems with one of the behaviours, while others have both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity. Most children have the combined type of ADHD.

In preschool, the most common ADHD symptom is hyperactivity.

It is normal to have some inattention, unfocused motor activity and impulsivity, but for people with ADHD, these behaviors:

  • are more severe
  • occur more often
  • interfere with or reduce the quality of how they function socially, at school, or in a job

Inattention -

People with symptoms of inattention may often:

  1. Overlook or miss details, make careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or during other activities
  2. Have problems sustaining attention in tasks or play, including conversations, lectures, or lengthy reading
  3. Not seem to listen when spoken to directly
  4. Not follow through on instructions and fail to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace or start tasks but quickly lose focus and get easily side-tracked
  5. Have problems organizing tasks and activities, such as what to do in sequence, keeping materials and belongings in order, having messy work and poor time management, and failing to meet deadlines
  6. Avoid or dislike tasks that require sustained mental effort, such as schoolwork or homework, or for teens and older adults, preparing reports, completing forms or reviewing lengthy papers
  7. Lose things necessary for tasks or activities, such as school supplies, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, and cell phones
  8. Be easily distracted by unrelated thoughts or stimuli
  9. Be forgetful in daily activities, such as chores, errands, returning calls, and keeping appointments

Hyperactivity-Impulsivity -

People with symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity may often:

  1. Fidget and squirm in their seats
  2. Leave their seats in situations when staying seated is expected, such as in the classroom or in the office
  3. Run or dash around or climb in situations where it is inappropriate or, in teens and adults, often feel restless
  4. Be unable to play or engage in hobbies quietly
  5. Be constantly in motion or “on the go,” or act as if “driven by a motor”
  6. Talk nonstop
  7. Blurt out an answer before a question has been completed, finish other people’s sentences, or speak without waiting for a turn in the conversation
  8. Have trouble waiting for his or her turn
  9. Interrupt or intrude on others, for example in conversations, games, or activities

Diagnosis of ADHD requires a comprehensive evaluation by a licensed clinician, such as a psychiatrist, psychologist, or child psychiatrist with expertise in ADHD. For a person to receive a diagnosis of ADHD, the symptoms of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity must be chronic or long-lasting, impair the person’s functioning, and cause the person to fall behind normal development for his or her age. The doctor will also ensure that any ADHD symptoms are not due to another medical or psychiatric condition. Most children with ADHD receive a diagnosis during the elementary school years. For an adolescent or adult to receive a diagnosis of ADHD, the symptoms need to have been present prior to age 12.

ADHD symptoms can appear as early as between the ages of 3 and 6 and can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Symptoms of ADHD can be mistaken for emotional or disciplinary problems or missed entirely in quiet, well-behaved children, leading to a delay in diagnosis. Adults with undiagnosed ADHD may have a history of poor academic performance, problems at work, or difficult or failed relationships.

ADHD symptoms can change over time as the person ages. In young children with ADHD, hyperactivity impulsivity is the most predominant symptom. As a child reaches elementary school, the symptom of inattention may become more prominent and cause the child to struggle academically. In adolescence, hyperactivity seems to lessen and may show more often as feelings of restlessness or fidgeting, but inattention and impulsivity may remain. Many adolescents with ADHD also struggle with relationships and antisocial behaviors. Inattention, restlessness, and impulsivity tend to persist into adulthood.

Risk Factors -

Scientists are not sure what causes ADHD. Like many other illnesses, a number of factors can contribute to

ADHD, such as:

  • Genes
  • Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, or drug use during pregnancy
  • Exposure to environmental toxins during pregnancy
  • Exposure to environmental toxins, such as high levels of lead, at a young age
  • Low birth weight
  • Brain injuries

ADHD is more common in males than females, and females with ADHD are more likely to have problems primarily with inattention. Other conditions, such as learning disabilities, anxiety disorder, conduct disorder, depression, and substance abuse, are common in people with ADHD.

 

Treatment and Therapies -

While there is no cure for ADHD, currently available treatments can help reduce symptoms and improve functioning. Treatments include medication, psychotherapy, education or training, or a combination of treatments.

Medication -

For many people, ADHD medications reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity and improve their ability to focus, work, and learn. The medication also may improve physical coordination. Sometimes several different medications or dosages must be tried before finding the right one that works for a particular person. Anyone taking medications must be monitored closely and carefully by their prescribing doctor.

Stimulants -

The most common type of medication used for treating ADHD is called a “stimulant.” Although it may seem unusual to treat ADHD with a medication that is considered a stimulant, it works because it increases the brain chemicals dopamine and norepinephrine, which play essential roles in thinking and attention.

Under medical supervision, stimulant medications are considered safe. However, there are risks and side effects, especially when misused or taken in excess of the prescribed dose. For example, stimulants can raise blood pressure and heart rate and increase anxiety. Therefore, a person with other health problems, including high blood pressure, seizures, heart disease, glaucoma, liver or kidney disease, or an anxiety disorder should tell their doctor before taking a stimulant.

Talk with a doctor if you see any of these side effects while taking stimulants:

  • decreased appetite
  • sleep problems
  • tics (sudden, repetitive movements or sounds);
  • personality changes
  • increased anxiety and irritability
  • stomach-aches
  • headaches

 

Non-stimulants -

A few other ADHD medications are non-stimulants. These medications take longer to start working than stimulants, but can also improve focus, attention, and impulsivity in a person with ADHD.

Doctors may prescribe a non-stimulant:

  • when a person has bothersome side effects from stimulants; when a stimulant was not effective; or in combination with a stimulant to increase effectiveness.
  • Although not approved specifically for the treatment of ADHD, some antidepressants are sometimes used alone or in combination with a stimulant to treat ADHD.
  • Antidepressants may help all of the symptoms of ADHD and can be prescribed if a patient has bothersome side effects from stimulants. Antidepressants can be helpful in combination with stimulants if a patient also has another condition, such as an anxiety disorder, depression, or another mood disorder.
  • Doctors and patients can work together to find the best medication, dose, or medication combination

 

Psychotherapy -

Adding psychotherapy to treat ADHD can help patients and their families to better cope with everyday problems.

Behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapy that aims to help a person change his or her behavior. It might involve practical assistance, such as help organizing tasks or completing schoolwork, or working through emotionally difficult events.

Behavioral therapy also teaches a person how to monitor his or her own behavior give oneself praise or rewards for acting in a desired way, such as controlling anger or thinking before acting

Parents, teachers, and family members also can give positive or negative feedback for certain behaviors and help establish clear rules, chore lists, and other structured routines to help a person control his or her behavior.

Therapists may also teach children social skills, such as how to wait their turn, share toys, ask for help, or respond to teasing. Learning to read facial expressions and the tone of voice in others, and how to respond appropriately can also be part of social skills training.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy can also teach a person mindfulness technique or meditation. A person learns how to be aware and accepting of one’s own thoughts and feelings to improve focus and concentration. The therapist also encourages the person with ADHD to adjust to the life changes that come with treatment, such as thinking before acting or resisting the urge to take unnecessary risks.

 

Family and marital therapy can help family members and spouses find better ways to handle disruptive behaviors, to encourage behavior changes, and improve interactions with the patient.

 

Education and Training -

Children and adults with ADHD need guidance and understanding from their parents, families, and teachers to reach their full potential and to succeed. For school-age children, frustration, blame, and anger may have built up within a family before a child is diagnosed. Parents and children may need special help to overcome negative feelings. Mental health professionals can educate parents about ADHD and how it affects a family. They also will help the child and his or her parents develop new skills, attitudes, and ways of relating to each other.

Parenting skills training (behavioral parent management training) teaches parents the skills they need to encourage and reward positive behaviors in their children. It helps parents learn how to use a system of rewards and consequences to change a child’s behavior. Parents are taught to give immediate and positive feedback for behaviors they want to encourage and ignore or redirect behaviors that they want to discourage. They may also learn to structure situations in ways that support the desired behavior.

Stress management techniques can benefit parents of children with ADHD by increasing their ability to deal with frustration so that they can respond calmly to their child’s behavior.

Support groups can help parents and families connect with others who have similar problems and concerns.

Groups often meet regularly to share frustrations and successes, to exchange information about recommended specialists and strategies, and to talk with experts.


Tips to Help Kids and Adults with ADHD Stay Organized

For Kids:

Parents and teachers can help kids with ADHD stay organized and follow directions with tools such as:

  1. Keeping a routine and a schedule. Keep the same routine every day, from wake-up time to bedtime.
  2. Include times for homework, outdoor play, and indoor activities. Keep the schedule on the refrigerator or on a bulletin board in the kitchen.
  3. Write changes on the schedule as far in advance as possible.
  4. Organizing everyday items. Have a place for everything, and keep everything in its place. This includes clothing, backpacks, and toys.
  5. Using homework and notebook organizers. Use organizers for school material and supplies. Stress to your child the importance of writing down assignments and bringing home the necessary books.
  6. Being clear and consistent. Children with ADHD need consistent rules they can understand and follow.
  7. Giving praise or rewards when rules are followed. Children with ADHD often receive and expect criticism. Look for good behavior, and praise it.

 

For Adults:

A professional counselor or therapist can help an adult with ADHD learn how to organize his or her life with tools such as:

  • Keeping routines
  • Making lists for different tasks and activities
  • Using a calendar for scheduling events
  • Using reminder notes
  • Assigning a special place for keys, bills, and paperwork
  • Breaking down large tasks into more manageable, smaller steps so that completing each part of the task provides a sense of accomplishment.
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ADHD - What Should You Know About It?

ADHD - What Should You Know About It?

If you have noticed your child to be restless and anxious all the time, it might look cute as the child is highly energetic, but it could be a cause for concern at the same time. It is not normal and the child could be having ADHD that is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. As the name suggests, it is a disorder with deficiency of attention and in which the child is always hyperactive.

ADHD is a disorder in which the symptoms usually show up before the age of seven. It is characterized by a group of behavioural symptoms that include inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. The symptoms should be persistent for a period of at least 6 months. The impact of these symptoms is felt extensively where his overall self-esteem is affected, be it at home, preschool or school, academics or extracurricular activities and in interpersonal relationships.

The most common symptoms, which are almost diagnostic of ADHD are:

  1. Inability to hold attention: The child's attention span is very short and it is very difficult to keep them engaged on one particular thing.
  2. Increased restlessness: The child would be extremely restless and gets distracted easily. Child is always ‘on the go'.
  3. Fidgeting: The child would be seen constantly fidgeting with his fingers.

The following are the less common ones:

  1. Learning disability is rare, but can happen. However, the good news is that it does not affect the child's intelligence.
  2. Sleep disorders
  3. Difficulty in following directions
  4. Poor executive functioning skills
  5. Disorganization, which can lead to poor motor coordination and impaired movements
  6. ADHD kids tend to forget things very easily and need help with coordinating movements
  7. The child suffering from ADHD could easily tire and/or feel lethargic with very low energy levels. This can lead to the child procrastinating things and not wanting to do things on priority basis
  8. These children also have difficulties with fine motor and cognitive skills and so there is delay in their overall participation in games.

While these are the pressing symptoms of ADHD, psychosocial and behaviour oriented treatments canal a significant role in managing the child in the following ways. As a first step, the caregiver should have a detailed discussion with the parents, school staff and any other people with whom the child interacts significantly.

This will help identify areas that need support from Therapy, which are the following:

  1. Support with gross and/or fine motor skills
  2. Support with improving handwriting
  3. Support with engaging in playing sports and games
  4. Support in engaging in social activities
  5. Improving sensory processing difficulties
  6. Improving visual perception
  7. Support in adapting to the environment
  8. Teaching strategies to participate in various social and academic activities

Medications in age appropriate doses with careful monitoring and frequent follow-ups also help in providing symptom releif.

So, while an ADHD child is definitely a cause for concern, proper support from family and society can help manage the condition.

4109 people found this helpful

Brain Size & IQ - Is There A Connection?

Brain Size & IQ - Is There A Connection?

When it comes to the brain and the IQ, is bigger the better? Does size really matter? Is there really a connection between the size of your brain and intelligence? With the help of findings by neurologists 
and scientists, we seek to find out!

1. Ailments and the Brain: Scientists have found that children with autism have a brain that has grown in a disproportionate manner in the very first year of their life. This prevents the child from making connections with normal behaviour. On the other hand, children and adolescents who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD have shown signs of having a much smaller brain size. Many scientists have shown that the size of the brain shrinks as we age, and this does not have any visible effect on our cognitive abilities.

2. It's all Relative: The size of the brain does not really have a bearing on the way a person's cognition gets shaped. Even large mammals like elephants and whales are finally hunted and tamed by humans who have smaller brains in comparison. The brain is made up of billions of neurons which need to function properly. It may be seen that scientists consider the brain mass in relation with the rest of the body so as to speculate about the cognitive abilities of the person. Why is this required? Large animals need a well functioning and proportionate brain size to control and run their organs with proper cognition for satisfactory results, which is what we humans seem to have done.

3. Neanderthal Brains: Historically, the earliest man or the Neanderthals are said to have had larger brains than we do. These people are believed to have brains that are at least 10% larger than the brains that we have in our modern times. The shape of their brain was different too. They were also heavily muscled people which had a bearing on the size and shape of the brain and bodies as well as the lean tissue within the brain. They also survived very successfully for a period of over 200,000 years, which obviously points to some form of elevated cognition, as per many scientists.

4. Animals: While animals with small brains like lizards and reptiles do not perform too well on IQ tests, the animals with bigger brains like elephants and dolphins perform much better. But the medium sized brains of monkeys, lemurs and other animals are said to perform in the best manner. The correlation between the body size and the brain does not seem to hold good here, as per various researches.

So the verdict as per medical science and research stands divided!

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Understanding ADHD - A Complete Guide To Attention Deficit!

Understanding ADHD - A Complete Guide To Attention Deficit!

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common neurobehavioral disorders presenting for treatment in children and adolescents. ADHD is often chronic with prominent symptoms and impairment spanning into adulthood. ADHD is often associated with co-occurring disorders including disruptive, mood, anxiety, and substance abuse. The diagnosis of ADHD is clinically established by review of symptoms and impairment. The biological underpinning of the disorder is supported by genetic, neuroimaging, neurochemistry and neuropsychological data. Consideration of all aspects of an individual’s life needs to be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. 

Specialized educational planning based on the child’s difficulties is necessary in a majority of cases. Since learning disorders co-occur in one-third of ADHD youth, ADHD individuals should be screened and appropriate individualised educational plans developed. Educational adjustments should be considered in individuals with ADHD with difficulties in behavioral or academic performance.

Symptoms in children and teenagers 

The symptoms of ADHD in children and teenagers are well defined, and they're usually noticeable before the age of six. They occur in more than one situation, such as at home and at school. The main signs of each behavioural problem are detailed below:

  1. Inattentiveness: having a short attention span and being easily distracted making careless mistakes – for example, in schoolwork appearing forgetful or losing things being unable to stick at tasks that are tedious or time-consuming appearing to be unable to listen to or carry out instructions constantly changing activity or task having difficulty organising tasks 
  2. Hyperactivity and impulsiveness: being unable to sit still, especially in calm or quiet surroundings constantly fidgeting being unable to concentrate on tasks excessive physical movement excessive talking being unable to wait their turn acting without thinking interrupting conversations little or no sense of danger 

These symptoms can cause significant problems in a child's life, such as underachievement at school, poor social interaction with other children and adults, and problems with discipline. 

Related conditions in children and teenagers 

Although not always the case, some children may also have signs of other problems or conditions alongside ADHD, such as: 

  • anxiety disorder – which causes your child to worry and be nervous much of the time; it may also cause physical symptoms, such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating and dizziness 
  • oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) – this is defined by negative and disruptive behaviour, particularly towards authority figures, such as parents and teachers 
  • conduct disorder – this often involves a tendency towards highly antisocial behaviour, such as stealing, fighting, vandalism and harming people or animals 
  • depression 
  • sleep problems – finding it difficult to get to sleep at night, and having irregular sleeping patterns 
  • autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) – this affects social interaction, communication, interests and behaviour 
  • epilepsy – a condition that affects the brain and causes repeated fits or seizures 
  • Tourette’s syndrome – a condition of the nervous system, characterised by a combination of involuntary noises and movements called tics 
  • learning difficulties – such as dyslexia Symptoms in adults In adults, the symptoms of ADHD are more difficult to define. This is largely due to a lack of research into adults with ADHD. 

It's known that symptoms of ADHD often persist from childhood into a person's teenage years, and then adulthood. Any additional problems or conditions experienced by children with ADHD, such as depression or dyslexia, may also continue into adulthood. By the age of 25, an estimated 15% of people diagnosed with ADHD as children still have a full range of symptoms, and 65% still have some symptoms that affect their daily lives. The symptoms in children and teenagers, which are listed above, is sometimes also applied to adults with possible ADHD. But some specialists say that the way in which inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness affect adults can be very different from the way they affect children. For example, hyperactivity tends to decrease in adults, while inattentiveness tends to get worse as the pressure of adult life increases. Adult symptoms of ADHD also tend to be far more subtle than childhood symptoms. 

Some specialists have suggested the following list of symptoms associated with ADHD in adults: 

  • carelessness and lack of attention to detail 
  • continually starting new tasks before finishing old ones 
  • poor organisational skills 
  • inability to focus or prioritise 
  • continually losing or misplacing things 
  • forgetfulness 
  • restlessness and edginess 
  • difficulty keeping quiet and speaking out of turn 
  • blurting out responses and often interrupting others 
  • mood swings, irritability and a quick temper 
  • inability to deal with stress 
  • extreme impatience 
  • taking risks in activities, often with little or no regard for personal safety or the safety of others – for example, driving dangerously 

Additional problems in adults with ADHD As with ADHD in children and teenagers, ADHD in adults can occur alongside several related problems or conditions. One of the most common conditions is depression. Other conditions that adults may have alongside ADHD include: 

  • personality disorders – conditions in which an individual differs significantly from an average person, in terms of how they think, perceive, feel or relate to others 
  • bipolar disordera condition that affects your moods, which can swing from one extreme to another 
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) – a condition that causes obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour 

The behavioural problems associated with ADHD can also cause problems such as difficulties with relationships, social interaction, drugs and crime. Some adults with ADHD find it hard to find and stay in a job. If you notice any of the above in your child or yourself , it is worth making the effort and spending some time and money to have your child and or yourself assessed on a priority basis as ADHD causes neural changes in the brain. 

5545 people found this helpful

ADHD In Adults - What Should You Know?

ADHD In Adults - What Should You Know?

Concentration problems and trouble in focusing on one task at a time can be termed as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD, in rare and severe cases. While most of the cases are identified in one's childhood, it has been seen that many cases persist into adulthood while still others go completely undiagnosed. This mental health disorder comes with a number of symptoms and management methods. Read on to know more.

  • Symptoms: While many patients suffering from this disorder may not display any obvious symptoms at a young age as children are supposed to be brimming with energy, the symptoms for adult ADHD, start to show up in a more obvious fashion. Wavering concentration and low levels of focus along with disorganised living with impulsiveness are the first signs of adult ADHD. Such adults also have trouble when it comes to finishing one task at a time, or even focusing on a task for a prolonged period of time. Bouts of impatience and excessive activity can also show up as symptoms, while restlessness is a quality that most of these patients seem to possess.
  • Diagnosis: The diagnosis of this condition is slightly difficult because most adults may complain of some or the other symptoms related to this condition at some point in their lives. Anxiety and mood swing related symptoms can help in diagnosing the condition in a better manner. If the condition ends up disrupting your normal life, work, socialising and behaviour in general, then you may want to see a doctor regarding the same, so that proper diagnosis may take place.
  • Causes: While genetic predisposition is said to be the foremost cause of this condition, especially when it continues well into adulthood, there are various environmental factors that may also have a significant bearing on the onset of the condition. Exposure as a child increases the risk of falling prey to this condition. Also, when there are problems with the central nervous system during the developing years, the patient may start to develop symptoms connected with this disorder later on.
  • Treatment: Stimulants and other medication like anti-depressants, nonstimulant amphetamine are also used for treating this condition along with therapy and psychological counselling for better organisation in life.
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Hyperactivity In Children - How Homeopathy Can Assist?

Hyperactivity In Children - How Homeopathy Can Assist?

Parents get very concerned when they are just not able to hold their child’s attention who is restless, hyperactive, anxious, highly energetic, and never attentive. For some, this could initially be an exciting phase but can be an indication of some serious underlying disorder too.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or hyperactive disorder or ADHD as it is commonly known as a group of symptoms including behavioural, mood, cognitive, and learning disabilities with a lot of aggression, irritability, excitability, forgetfulness, restlessness, reduced attention span, etc. in these children. Listed below are the common symptoms, which are almost diagnostic of ADHD are:

The impact is felt across all spheres of life including home, academics, school life, and in relationships with friends.

  1. Usually seen in children before the age of 7.
  2. With very short attention spans, the child constantly looks for something to do and be engaged.
  3. Very easy to get distracted even when engaged, the child is very restless.
  4. Sleep disorders.
  5.  With constantly being on the toes, the child feels tired and lethargic.
  6. Difficulty prioritising and frequent procrastination.
  7. They forget things quite easily and would ask for help with coordinating movements.
  8. Rare, but some children can have learning disabilities like dyslexia, but their intelligence levels are not affected.
  9. Disorganisation, leading to poor motor coordination and impaired movements.
  10. Difficulties with fine motor and cognitive skills may cause a delay in engagement in sports.

Causes

  • Diet changes with a rise in processed foods and sugary diet.
  • Social changes like nuclear families, single parents, lack of siblings, etc.
  • Increased time spent with electronic devices.

Homoeopathy has an effective cure for ADHD as it looks at the child holistically and proposes remedies. Homeopathic constitutional treatment provides an effective solution for ADHD. Some common remedies are listed below. A word of caution though never self-medicate using these. ADHD is a complex condition and should be assessed completely before initiating treatment.

  1. Tarentula Hispana: Most commonly used in treating idiosyncrasies. The child is hyperactive, compulsive, restless, constantly moving, and has difficulty being in one place, can be violent and destructive. Strange, but they have a strong liking to music.
  2. Stramonium: When the child is fearful or aggressive or withdrawn (usually due to a traumatic event), they tend to seek attention and this is then used.
  3. Hyoscyamus Niger: Used in children who present with manic or sexualised symptoms.

Homeopathy is used in ADHD where symptoms are across the spectrum - hyperactive to complete withdrawal, completely based on symptoms and psychotherapy plays an important role in treatment through behaviour modification techniques like CBT.

4329 people found this helpful

Homeopathic Treatment For Hyperactivity In Children!

Homeopathic Treatment For Hyperactivity In Children!

Parents get very concerned when they are just not able to hold their child’s attention who is restless, hyperactive, anxious, highly energetic, and never attentive. For some, this could initially be an exciting phase but can be an indication of some serious underlying disorder too.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or hyperactive disorder or ADHD as it is commonly known is a group of symptoms including behavioural, mood, cognitive, and learning disabilities with a lot of aggression, irritability, excitability, forgetfulness, restlessness, reduced attention span, etc. in these children. Listed below are the common symptoms, which are almost diagnostic of ADHD are:

The impact is felt across all spheres of life including home, academics, school life, and in relationships with friends.

  1. Usually seen in children before the age of 7.
  2. With very short attention spans, the child constantly looks for something to do and be engaged.
  3. Very easy to get distracted even when engaged, the child is very restless.
  4. Sleep disorders.
  5.  With constantly being on the toes, the child feels tired and lethargic.
  6. Difficulty prioritising and frequent procrastination.
  7. They forget things quite easily and would ask for help with coordinating movements.
  8. Rare, but some children can have learning disabilities like dyslexia, but their intelligence levels are not affected.
  9. Disorganisation, leading to poor motor coordination and impaired movements.
  10. Difficulties with fine motor and cognitive skills may cause delay in engagement in sports.

Causes

  • Diet changes with rise in processed foods and sugary diet.
  • Social changes like nuclear families, single parents, lack of siblings, etc.
  • Increased time spent with electronic devices.

Homoeopathy has an effective cure for ADHD as it looks at the child holistically and proposes remedies. Homeopathic constitutional treatment provides an effective solution for adhd. Some common remedies are listed below. A word of caution though never self-medicate using these. ADHD is a complex condition and should be assessed completely before initiating treatment.

  1. Tarentula Hispana: Most commonly used in treating idiosyncrasies. The child is hyperactive, compulsive, restless, constantly moving, and has difficult being in one place, can be violent and destructive. Strange, but they have a strong liking to music.
  2. Stramonium: When the child is fearful or aggressive or withdrawn (usually due to a traumatic event), they tend to seek attention and this is then used.
  3. Hyoscyamus Niger: Used in children who present with manic or sexualized symptoms.

Homeopathy is used in ADHD where symptoms are across the spectrum - hyperactive to complete withdrawal, completely based on symptoms and psychotherapy plays an important role in treatment through behavior modification techniques like CBT.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult Homeopathy Doctor in Nagpur & get answers to your questions!
 

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