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Hormonal Replacement Therapy Health Feed

Hormone Therapy - How Can It Help In Menopause?

Dr.Shantha Rama Rao 88% (128ratings)
MD, DGO, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Chennai
Hormone Therapy - How Can It Help In Menopause?

The menopause can take three very different routes for women. There are those who sail through it with very few symptoms or problems and don't even notice that their ovaries have stopped producing the hormone. Then there are those for whom it is a matter of a few hot flushes and a couple of night sweats, doesn't last long and not really a bother. This usually marks a relief from the periods. But for some, it is abject misery accompanied by crippling fatigue, absolute exhaustion, hot flushes, vaginal drying, mood swings along with low desire or lack of sexual feelings. These symptoms might persist for more than 7 years.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is considered to be an effective treatment for menopausal symptoms. The other problems linked with menopause can also be influenced by HRT in a positive manner.

HRT is indicated in:

-  Treatment of symptoms of menopause and the risk-benefit ratio is apt for the women and they have been informed about the same

-  HRT is indicated in symptomatic patient, nearing menopause.There are other rare indication like osteoporosis. Your gynaecologist will decide it.

-  HRT is started only after examination and after doing some blood tests, also mammogram if necessary.

Benefits of HRT:

The benefits of HRT usually are more than the risk if done in a woman who is under 60 years of age. 
These include:

-  Improvement of the quality of life by relieving muscle pains, and improving sleep

-  The mood swings are controlled and low moods are usually alleviated by HRT. Low moods usually arise due to menopause.

-  It reduces the vasomotor symptoms, usually within four months of the treatment with maximum benefit in three months

-  HRT improves the urogenital symptoms by lowering the vaginal dryness, vaginal atrophy, urinary frequency and symptoms. 

-  HRT reduces the risk of osteoporosis. HRT is believed to preserve the bone mass density of the skeletal sites thus reducing the chances of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures.

-  HRT also reduces the risk of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular diseases

Risks of HRT

The main risks of HRT are stroke, endometrial and breast cancer, thromboembolic disease, pulmonary embolism and gallbladder disease

-  It increases the risk of ischemic stroke

-  There is a small risk associated with breast cancer and the risk increases more if the woman is underweight or overweight, alcohol user, smoker and stops HRT suddenly

-  Estrogen-only HRT can increase the risk of endometrial cancer. If cyclical progestogen is used for 10 days for 28 cycles then the risk is eliminated.

1318 people found this helpful

Hormone Replacement Therapy - Can Older Women Opt It?

Dr.Chintan B. Patel 87% (185ratings)
DNB Family Medicine, MBBS
General Physician, Ahmedabad
Hormone Replacement Therapy - Can Older Women Opt It?

Hormone replacement therapy used to treat symptoms of menopause by restoring the balance of estrogen and progesterone by administering it.

Forms of Hormonal Therapy

Local therapy which includes creams, pessaries, and rings; systemic therapy in the form of oral drugs, transdermal patches, gels, and implants. Women who do not have womb take combined estrogen and progesterone hormones in the form of pills.

Effect of Menopause and How Hormone Replacement Therapy Helps
Menopause affects urogenital system causing atrophy of mucosal lining of urethra, vagina, and vulva leading to dryness and reduced vaginal secretions. It affects bones in which metabolism takes place causing progressive bone loss. It increases the risk of heart disease. By starting with hormone replacement therapy, most of the menopausal symptoms get relieved like hot flushes, irregular menses, night sweats, mood swings, loss of libido, osteoporosis. It is believed that women who start hormone replacement therapy may develop cancer in future, but still, research is going on.

Who should go for it?

  • Menopausal women who suffer moderate to severe hot flushes, loss of libido, urogenital problems, psychological issues such as anxiety and mood swings
  • Menopausal women who have severe joint pain or pain all over due to decreased bone mass
  • Women who got menopause early (before the age of 40)
  • Women who had their ovaries removed

Hormone replacement therapy is carefully selected for those women who are at low risk to develop heart disease and breast cancer.

Guidelines for Menopausal Women Receiving Hormone Replacement Therapy

  1. Menopausal women who have undergone hysterectomy can receive estrogen replacement alone.
  2. Menopausal women, who have a uterus, receive a combination of estrogen and progestogen to prevent endometrial cancer.
  3. In menopausal women, who experience moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms, the duration of hormone replacement therapy use will optimally be less than 5 years.
  4. For menopausal women, who suffer vaginal dryness due to less vaginal secretion, intravaginal estrogen preparation is given.
  5. Hormone replacement therapy doesn’t improve loss of libido; however, if it is disturbing most, transdermal estrogen is given.
  6. To reduce the longer use of hormone replacement therapy, lower doses of both estrogen and progestogens are suggested.

Can Hormone Replacement Therapy be given to Older Women?

Yes. Women who had menopause 10-15 years back can go for hormone replacement therapy, but the benefit is quite less compared to the younger age group. Possible risk of heart disease and cancer should be kept in mind before prescribing it to older women.

Risk/Side-effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy

  1. Breast cancer
  2. Endometrial cancer
  3. Thromboembolism Heart disease
  4. Breast tenderness
  5. Nausea Bloating

Treatment Regimen

Combination hormone replacement therapy regime is given by using lower doses of estrogen and progestin.

2475 people found this helpful

Hormone Therapy - How Can It Help In Early Menopause?

Dr.Sunita Singh 91% (27ratings)
Associate Professor (PMCH), MS Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS, Consultant Gynaecologist & Obstretician, Consultant Gynecologist & obstetrician, Consultant Gynaecologist
Gynaecologist, Patna

The menopause can take three very different routes for women. There are those who sail through it with very few symptoms or problems and don't even notice that their ovaries have stopped producing the hormone. Then there are those for whom it is a matter of a few hot flushes and a couple of night sweats, doesn't last long and not really a bother. This usually marks a relief from the periods. But for some, it is abject misery accompanied by crippling fatigue, absolute exhaustion, hot flushes, vaginal drying, mood swings along with low desire or lack of sexual feelings. These symptoms might persist for more than 7 years.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is considered to be an effective treatment for menopausal symptoms. The other problems linked with menopause can also be influenced by HRT in a positive manner.

HRT is indicated in:

-  Treatment of symptoms of menopause and the risk benefit ratio is apt for the women and they have been informed about the same

-  For women who are around 51 years and are reaching menopause, even though they are asymptomatic

-  In women who are at the risk of osteoporotic fractures and are under 60 years and the non-estrogen treatments cannot be given

-  HRT is not recommended in women who are above 60 years

Benefits of HRT:

The benefits of HRT usually are more than the risk if done in a woman who is under 60 years of age. 
These include:

-  Improvement of the quality of life by relieving muscle pains, and improving sleep

-  The mood swings are controlled and low moods are usually alleviated by HRT. Low moods usually arise due to menopause.

-  It reduces the vasomotor symptoms, usually within four months of the treatment with maximum benefit in three months

-  HRT improves the urogenital symptoms by lowering the vaginal dryness, vaginal atrophy, urinary frequency and symptoms. 

-  HRT reduces the risk of osteoporosis. HRT is believed to preserve the bone mass density of the skeletal sites thus reducing the chances of vertebral and non vertebral fractures.

-  HRT also reduces the risk of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular diseases

Risks of HRT

The main risks of HRT are stroke, endometrial and breast cancer, thromboembolic disease, pulmonary embolism and gallbladder disease. Though other risks are:

-  It increases the risk of ischemic stroke

-  There is a small risk associated with breast cancer and the risk increases more, if the woman is underweight or overweight, alcohol user, smoker and stops HRT suddenly

-  Estrogen-only HRTs can increase the risk of endometrial cancer. If cyclical progestogen is used for 10 days for 28 cycles then the risk is eliminated.

1349 people found this helpful

Spinal Fractures - Is Osteoporosis A Reason Behind Weak Bone?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Navi Mumbai
Spinal Fractures - Is Osteoporosis A Reason Behind Weak Bone?

Osteoporosis is a condition wherein the bones become brittle and weak; so much so that even mildly stressful activities such as coughing, bending over or even a slight fall (such as the one from a high rise chair) can result in fractures. Osteoporosis-related fractures commonly occur in the spine, hip or the wrist. The human body has a continuous mechanism of bone absorption and removal. In the case of osteoporosis, the creation of new bones doesn’t happen in accordance with the removal of old bones.

Spinal Fractures: 

The bones of the spine get extremely vulnerable to breakage and even cracking open. The fractures in the spine, also known as vertebral compression fractures can cause a sharp stinging pain in the back that may make sitting, standing, or even walking a very tardy task.

Risk Factors:

  1. Increasing age

  2. Abnormally less or high body weight

  3. Smoking

  4. Menopause or low levels of sex hormones

  5. Gender: This disorder is more likely to affect women as compared to men. Also women, who are above 50 are more likely to suffer from this debilitating disorder.

  6. The race is a significant risk factor of osteoporosis. If you are of Asian descent, you are more likely to be affected by it.

  7. Having a family history of osteoporosis will put you at a greater risk of this disorder.

Symptoms:

  1. Fractured or collapsed vertebra causing back pain

  2. A stooped posture

  3. A shrunken appearance (as if one has had a loss of height)

  4. Very fragile bones, thus increasing risks of fractures

  5. Severe and sudden pain in the back

  6. Difficulty in twisting or bending the body

Lower spine fractures are way more troublesome as compared to fractures in the upper spine. Fracturing more than a bone in the spine also remains a huge possibility.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Firstly, an X-ray or a computerized tomography (CT scan) will be done to have a closer look at the bones. A bone density test is another commonly used method of diagnosing osteoporosis.

  1. Steroids and medications: Some medications may be used to prevent or combat osteoporosis. These include alendronate, ibandronate, risedronate and zoledronic acid.

  2. Physical therapy: Just like muscles, bones get stronger too when you exercise. Weight-bearing and muscle- strengthening exercises are the most helpful in this regard and are considered best for the treatment of osteoporosis. Cardiovascular exercises such as walking, jogging or even swimming can prove to be immensely beneficial.

  3. Diet: Make a diet chart that includes high-calcium food items, dairy products such as yogurt, cheese, and low-fat milk, tofu, green vegetables such as collard greens and broccoli, sea fish such as salmon and sardines.

  4. Salt: Limit salt intake

  5. Therapy: Hormone replacement therapy (treatment method consisting of estrogens to alleviate and treat symptoms of osteoporosis) is another method of treatment that can be recommended by the doctor.

1814 people found this helpful

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

MBBS, MRCOG, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fogsi Certified Infertility & Usd Training
Gynaecologist, Noida
Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

- Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
- Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
- Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding
- Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding
- Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis

As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following :

- Physical exam
- Transvaginal ultrasound
- Endometrial biopsy
- Hysteroscopy
- Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment

Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis. For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient. Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.
Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases. So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

2428 people found this helpful

Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Deal With It?

Homoeocare Clinics 87% (23ratings)
Homeopathy Doctor, Delhi
Menopause - How Homeopathy Can Deal With It?

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

1.        A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.

2.        Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers etc.

3.        Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.

4.        Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.

5.        Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.

6.        Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.

7.        Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.

8.        Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.

9.        Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.

10.        Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.

11.        Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.

12.        Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.


 

 

8150 people found this helpful

Menopause - Know Its Impacts On Your Body!

MBBS, MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DGO
Gynaecologist, Hyderabad
Menopause - Know Its Impacts On Your Body!

Menopause is characterized as the absence of menstrual periods for 12 months. It is the time in a woman’s life when the ovaries stop functioning. The periods then stop forever. The normal period of menopause is 51 years of age, however, menopause may happen as ahead of schedule i.e. as early as 30s or as late as the 60s. There is no solid lab test to determine when a lady will encounter menopause.

Here are a few ways in which menopause affects a woman’s body:

  1. Skin: Consequences of menopause include dryness, loss of flexibility, thinning of the skin and expanded wrinkling. These symptoms result in poor recovery from injuries, hair loss and pigmentary changes. Unwanted hair growth and acne may likewise happen. Wrinkling is caused by excessive smoking and sun exposure. One should stay away from smoking and sun exposure.
  2. Hair: Hormonal changes incorporate hirsutism (undesirable facial hair) or alopecia. Most ordinarily noted is the loss of scalp hair. Lower leg, pubic and axillary hair loss may also take place. Hirsutism is commonly noted on the face. Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) may control facial hair in a few ladies. Medicines for expanded facial hair incorporate suing depilatory creams, delicate techniques for hair removal, laser treatment andante-testosterone medicines. Scalp alopecia might be treated with minoxidil.
  3. Teeth: Menopause has been a cause for various dental/oral issues, including dry mouth and desquamative gingivitis. IHRT might be of advantage as a consequence of the part it plays in influencing oral bone and preventing the loss of teeth. The impacts of HRT seem to incorporate a reduction in bleedingand enhancing the flow of saliva.
  4. Vulva and vagina: The genital tract is exceptionally dependent on estrogen and body changes during the menopausal time and post-menopause may incorporate vaginal and vulvar dryness. Vulval dryness may worsen other vulval skin conditions (e.g. dermatitis) bringing about aggravation. Staying away from cleansers and body washes on the vulva can dial down the aggravation and dryness. Contrasting options to cleanser incorporate sorbolene with glycerine or low-aggravation purifying balms and lotions.
  5. Bladder: Urinary frequency and cystitis are very common around the time of menopause. Local estrogen creams may enhance incontinence in the short term, however, don't seem to do as such after treatment is stopped. Treatment for incontinence includes physiotherapy and even surgery.
  6. Joints and muscles: Joint and muscle pain are regular symptoms during menopause. Exercise is vital to get rid of these side effects. Joint and muscle pain may improve with the utilization of HRT.
  7. Weight changes: Between ages 45 and 55, ladies will gain a large portion of a kilo a year. This weight gain cannot be blamed on menopause entirely. The changes in hormonal status are connected with expanded body and stomach fat. This weight addition is connected with increased cardiovascular and metabolic hazard and changes in quality of life and sexual functioning.
  8. Lifestyle measures: Your diet and eating routine need to be established to keep up a solid body weight and to have a healthy lifestyle.
3915 people found this helpful

Menopause - How To Handle It Well?

Dr.Chitrangada Gupta 88% (15ratings)
MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS, Fellowship In Reproductive Medicine
Gynaecologist, Lucknow
Menopause - How To Handle It Well?

While menstruation is definite proof that a woman can bear children, menopause is, as the name suggests, a pause in the fact. Meaning that the woman experiences a permanent stop in her periodic cycle and will further be unable to bear children. It is a difficult time for women, apart from dealing with the fact that they will not be able to reproduce further, there also arises a variety of complications. The realisation can hit hard and women often experience depressive episodes and numerous hormonal imbalances. Keeping that in mind, menopause is also different for different individuals and there is no one magic cure for it.

Every individual experiences a series of changes and requires different treatments because there are 3 different types of menopause and all of those require separate attention. That being said, there are a few common symptoms that show up and here are a few ways that you can deal with them:

  1. Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): This a slightly dicey method for the complications it may or may not carry in its wake but it is quite effective for a lot of people. Basically what this procedure entails is that your body will be supplied with hormones (oestrogen) the production of which has depleted, from the outside in the form of tablets or a gel so as to counter the hormonal imbalances. There are two kinds of HRTs; one is for women who have retained their wombs, it is called “Combined HRT”. The individual is supplied with two kinds of hormones, oestrogen, and progesterone. And the other kind is the “Oestrogen only HRT” which is for women who have had a hysterectomy. This treatment should be strictly observed by your gynaecologist and any discomfort felt should be reported back immediately.
  2. Dealing with hot flushes: This is something all women suffer from as soon as menopause hits or from even before as they are reaching towards it. It is also accompanied by night sweats. To deal with both, it is advised that you wear cotton or similarly light clothes, take cool showers, rest and relax as much as possible, include an exercise regime in your daily life or even yoga, hydrate yourself, and avoid drinking, coffee, and very spicy food items. They may act as triggers.
  3. Treating vaginal discomfort: If you experience vaginal discomfort such as dryness or excessive itching, contact your doctor immediately as you may have to start HRT or lubricants-containing oestrogen. Apart from that, to fend off dryness you could also use vaginal lubricants to soothe the painful sensations.
  4. Treating osteoporosis: Due to the lowered levels of oestrogen in the body, women who have reached menopause are more prone to suffering from weak and brittle bones, also known as osteoporosis. Taking vitamin supplements as well as including different kinds of fruits and vegetables and yoghurt in your diet is absolutely essential to combat this along with exercise.
2326 people found this helpful

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Can It Be Considered As Normal?

MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, DGO
Gynaecologist, Indore
Postmenopausal Bleeding - Can It Be Considered As Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

- Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
- Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
- Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding
- Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding
- Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis

As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following:

- Physical exam
- Transvaginal ultrasound
- Endometrial biopsy
- Hysteroscopy
- Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment

- Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis.

- For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

- For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient.

- Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

- Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases.

So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

1985 people found this helpful

Menopause - Can Homeopathy Help?

Dr.Appu Varghese 90% (11ratings)
BHMS
Homeopathy Doctor, Kochi
Menopause - Can Homeopathy Help?

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause:

1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.

2. Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers etc.

3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.

4. Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.

5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.

6. Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.

7. Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.

8. Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.

9. Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.

10. Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.

11. Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.

12.  Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.


 

 

3201 people found this helpful
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