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Heavy Periods Health Feed

I used trenaxa mf tables bleeding stop but the tablets complete after 24 hours bleeding continue.

I used trenaxa mf tables bleeding stop but the tablets complete after 24 hours bleeding continue.
Hi, Get the ultrasound gynae along with thyroid profile. Fasting blood sugar, s prolactin. Then medicine should be given after all test.
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Menorrhagia - What Causes It?

Menorrhagia - What Causes It?

Menstruation is the monthly discharge of blood from the vagina, which lasts for about 5 to 6 days. It is the shedding of the inner lining of the uterus, when pregnancy does not occur after the release of egg from the ovary. Menstrual periods are generally often accompanied by painful cramps in the lower abdomen, heavy bleeding, weakness, water retention, irritability and malaise.

What is Menorrhagia?

Very heavy or prolonged periods are medically termed as menorrhagia. It is abnormally heavy bleeding if there is a requirement to change sanitary napkins or tampons several times within a very short span of time. Passing large blood clots, night time bleeding, bleeding for over 7 -8 days, are other symptoms that one might be suffering from menorrhagia.

Common Causes Behind It

  1. Menorrhagia is mostly a cause of hormonal imbalance, particularly in the levels of estrogens and progesterone.

  2. Fibroids, cysts or polyps in the organs of the reproductive system, which includes the uterus, ovaries or fallopian tubes.

  3. History of miscarriage or failed pregnancies.

  4. Use of contraceptives

How can you treat heavy bleeding during menses

  1. You must include more minerals, iron, magnesium and calcium in your diet. Your diet must comprise a lot of green vegetables, fresh fruits and dairy products.

  2. Some non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen may be prescribed to reduce the blood loss.

  3. Certain hormonal therapies to regulate the hormonal imbalances and menstrual irregularities.

  4. Home remedies such as intake of certain herbs, ginger and coriander seeds help to control heavy bleeding.

  5. Increasing magnesium intake to balance out levels of oestrogen.

  6. It is best to stick to natural remedies, as it generally does not create complications in other bodily functions.

If the bleeding cannot be controlled even after a change of diet and home remedies, you must visit the gynaecologist as soon as possible. Heavy bleeding is a serious problem, especially if accompanied by dizziness, fluctuations in the blood pressure, nausea and weight loss. Severe cramps and constant bleeding can hinder daily routine, therefore, the earlier you receive medical attention, the quicker you will get relief.

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Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Postmenopausal Bleeding - Is It Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women's gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB, as it is popularly called, can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

  • Atrophic vaginitis: Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
  • Endometrial atrophy: Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
  • Polyps: Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding.
  • Infections: General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding.
  • Cancers: Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis: As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding. Diagnostic methods could include the following:

  1. Physical examination
  2. Transvaginal ultrasound
  3. Endometrial biopsy
  4. Hysteroscopy
  5. Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment: Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis. For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy. For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient. Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

Cancer: This would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases. So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after a year of menopause, do not ignore it.

Is Postmenopausal Bleeding Normal?

Is Postmenopausal Bleeding Normal?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.

Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

- Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.
- Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.
- Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding
- Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding
- Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis

As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following:

- Physical exam
- Transvaginal ultrasound
- Endometrial biopsy
- Hysteroscopy
- Dilatation and Curettage

Treatment

- Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis.

- For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

- For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient.

- Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.

- Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases.

So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

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Sir, I has sex with my gf 16 days back and now she says little bleeding from her vagina occurs and her underwear gets little blackish. She says that she had little bit back pain and skin irritation. Thoda thoda khujli hota ha vagina pe. What is happening sir is it pregnancy?

Sir, I has sex with my gf 16 days back and now she says little bleeding from her vagina occurs and her underwear gets...
Please let me know the date of her last menstrual period and date of your contact so that I can guide you properly.
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Dr. today was the last day of periods of my girlfriend. Today we had protected sex. But after sex, she is little bleeding from her vagina. What's the problem. Is there any problem?

Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy menstrual bleeding is a common concern, most women don't experience blood loss severe enough to be defined as menorrhagia. You may require a physical examination and few test like pap test, endometrial biopsy, ultrasounds, blood test etc. To diagnose your menstrual disorders.
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