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Heart Transplantation Health Feed

Heart Transplant - Know More About It!

Heart Transplant - Know More About It!

There are many people worldwide who suffer from heart problems (irrespective of their age and sex). While in most cases, the condition improves with proper treatment and medications, in few, the condition is beyond treatment. A heart transplant comes as a saviour for such people. It gives them a new lease of life. The transplant involves replacing a heart that has stopped functioning normally (damaged or may be diseased) with a healthy heart (from the donor).

Over the years, heart transplant has undergone a sea of change. With the advancement of science and technology, the success rate in a heart transplant has seen an exponential rise.

People who need a heart transplant:
A heart transplant may be essential in the following cases.

  • A congenital heart disorder (a person born with a heart problem).
  • Defective or diseased heart valves.
  • Amyloidosis (a condition where amyloid fibrils get deposed in the tissues and organs of the body intracellularly or extracellularly).
  • Problems in the coronary artery.
  • Cardiomyopathy (A condition where the muscles of the heart become weak, thereby affecting the normal functioning of the heart).
  • A heart transplant that failed previously.
  • Ventricular Arrhythmias (a condition that originates in the ventricles, in ventricular arrhythmias, the heart rhythms are abnormally rapid).


However, under the following circumstances, a heart transplant may not be a wise idea

  • People with infections or chronic lung or kidney disorders.
  • A case of cancer in the past.
  • Age may be a deciding factor. The recovery from a heart transplant may not be 100% in an aged person.

The heart transplant procedure:
The first step in heart transplant is the availability of a suitable donor. In this case, a donor is a person whose brain is dead but the other organs, including the heart, is healthy and functioning properly. A surgeon performs three operations in a heart transplant.

  • The first operation is essentially the removal of the healthy heart from the donor body. The heart is kept in a cool place, preferably ice (to keep the heart alive and in good condition until the heart transplant takes place).
  • In the second operation, the recipient's damaged or diseased heart is operated out. The situation may, however, be complicated if the patient had heart surgery in the past.
  • The third and the final surgery involves implanting the donor heart into the recipient body (the recipient's upper heart chambers and the atrial back wall are however not removed).
  • Once the implantation takes place (without any complications), the surgeons sew the heart into place.
  • The blood vessels are then connected back to the heart and the lungs. The heart starts beating again once it is warmed up.
  • To enable the patient to receive the nutrients and oxygen (during the heart transplant), the patient is put on a heart-lung machine.
  • If no complications develop after the transplant, the patient is discharged within a fortnight.

In some unfortunate cases, there may be organ rejection. The condition arises when the recipient's immune cells see the transplanted heart as non-self (foreign agents). If left unattended, it may damage the heart. Immunosuppressant drugs can help avert rejection. However, it is important to monitor the patient closely for any infections that may arise to the administration of the immunosuppressants.

1 person found this helpful

Heart Transplant - What Can Affect Your Eligibility For It?

Heart Transplant - What Can Affect Your Eligibility  For It?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

3014 people found this helpful

Heart Transplant - When It Is Required?

Heart Transplant - When It Is Required?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

3039 people found this helpful

Open Heart Surgery - Things To Expect!

Open Heart Surgery - Things To Expect!

One of the crucial types of surgery is the heart surgery, which is commonly known as the bypass. It is a type of surgery in which the chest is cut, and surgery is done on valves, muscles, and heart arteries. As per the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, it is one of the most common types of surgeries, which is performed on adults. During this surgery, the prime focus is to remove the blockage from the heart so that fresh blood can easily flow into the heart. No doubt that this process is critical, but it is easily true that after the surgery you have to take extra care of yourself.

Talking of which, here are certain things that you can expect after the surgery.

  1. Moved To ICU: The moment, the surgery is done, you will be moved to the Intensive Care Unit where the person’s health conditions will be monitored, vital signs will be checked, and medical professional will frequently visit to make sure that the patient is just doing fine. Once the surgery is over, you may not wake up quickly, but you will continue to breathe through the breathing tube. About food, of course, you will not be allowed to take solid food, but there is an intravenous (IV) needle will be put in a blood vessel in your chest and arm from which you will be given fluids. 
  2. Recovery At Home: Once you are given the discharge, your focus should be to get recovered quickly. Recovery at home entirely depends on the heart problem for which the surgery was done. Of course, the doctor will give you necessary instructions with regards to healing incision, dealing with after effect is and understanding the signs of complications. Follow up the medicines and attend the appointments as advised to keep track of your health condition. You may face some after effects such as appetite loss, constipation and sleeping problem. If there is any complication, make sure you speak with a doctor about the same immediately.
  3. Ongoing Care Is Important Too: Once the surgery is over, as said, you will have to go for frequent checkup with your doctor. During these visits, your doctor will tell you to get blood, stress test and electrocardiogram done, which will assess the working condition of the heart. You might also be given few blood-thinning medicine and bring certain changes in lifestyle and medicine.

There are certain phases of recovery which will take time eventually. The first phase is the lengthy one that can last for around 6-8 weeks. Once you get a discharge from the hospital, you will be given instructions that you must follow with good care. This will pace up the healing process and make the process better.

1850 people found this helpful

Know About Heart Transplant And Why Do You Need It?

Know About Heart Transplant And Why Do You Need It?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

2186 people found this helpful

Open Heart Surgery - What Should You Be Expecting?

Open Heart Surgery - What Should You Be Expecting?

One of the crucial types of surgery is the heart surgery, which is commonly known as the bypass. It is a type of surgery in which the chest is cut, and surgery is done on valves, muscles, and heart arteries. As per the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, it is one of the most common types of surgeries, which is performed on adults.

 During this surgery, the prime focus is to remove the blockage from the heart so that fresh blood can easily flow into the heart. No doubt that this process is critical, but it is easily true that after the surgery you have to take extra care of yourself.

Talking of which, here are certain things that you can expect after the surgery.

  1. Moved To ICU: The moment, the surgery is done, you will be moved to the Intensive Care Unit where the person’s health conditions will be monitored, vital signs will be checked, and medical professional will frequently visit to make sure that the patient is just doing fine. Once the surgery is over, you may not wake up quickly, but you will continue to breathe through the breathing tube. About food, of course, you will not be allowed to take solid food, but there is an intravenous (IV) needle will be put in a blood vessel in your chest and arm from which you will be given fluids. 
  2. Recovery At Home: Once you are given the discharge, your focus should be to get recovered quickly. Recovery at home entirely depends on the heart problem for which the surgery was done. Of course, the doctor will give you necessary instructions with regards to healing incision, dealing with after effect is and understanding the signs of complications. Follow up the medicines and attend the appointments as advised to keep track of your health condition. You may face some after effects such as appetite loss, constipation and sleeping problem. If there is any complication, make sure you speak with a doctor about the same immediately.
  3. Ongoing Care Is Important Too: Once the surgery is over, as said, you will have to go for frequent checkup with your doctor. During these visits, your doctor will tell you to get blood, stress test and electrocardiogram done, which will assess the working condition of the heart. You might also be given few blood-thinning medicine and bring certain changes in lifestyle and medicine.

There are certain phases of recovery which will take time eventually. The first phase is the lengthy one that can last for around 6-8 weeks. Once you get a discharge from the hospital, you will be given instructions that you must follow with good care. This will pace up the healing process and make the process better.

3892 people found this helpful

What Should You Know About Heart Transplant?

What Should You Know About Heart Transplant?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

3381 people found this helpful

Cardiologist in Gurgaon

Cardiologist in Gurgaon

Heart problems can be very dangerous and can even lead to death in some cases. Best cardiologist in Gurgaon are someone who specialises in diagnosing, preventing and treating any kind of heart problems or disorders. Cardiologist are specialised in subspecialties and can be classified as clinical cardiologists or cardiac surgeons. Clinical cardiologists can perform minimally invasive surgeries like pacemaker implantation and few others for effective management of heart problems. Few of the best cardiologists in Gurgaon are mentioned below:

1. Dr. Naresh Trehan

Diplomate, Diplomate, M.B.B.S.

Consultation fees: ₹1000

Dr. Trehan is a world-renowned cardiovascular and cardiothoracic surgeon. He has been awarded Padma Bhushan and the Padma Shri the most prestigious awards by Government of India for his contribution in the field of cardiology. In 50 years of his practice he has to his record over 48,000 successful open heart surgeries. He is pioneer of many advanced technologies in India and is currently the Chairman and Managing Director of Medanta – The Medicity, Gurgaon. His areas of specialization are Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery, Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery and Heart Transplant.

2. Dr. Umesh Gupta

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1000- 1500

Dr. Umesh Gupta is a reputed cardiologist with 48 years of experience, recipient of Bharat Gaurav award and founder of Umkal Hospital, Gurgaon. He is pioneer of cardiac surgeries and had introduced techniques like the Tilt Table Test and Late Potential Analysis. He in years of practice has treated several cases of chronic heart problems and is known for his ethical practice.

3. Dr. Balbir Singh

D.M. (Cardiology), M.B.B.S., M.D. (General Medicine)

Consultation fees: ₹1000

Dr. Balbir Singh is one of the best Cardiologists with 35 years of experience. He has many feathers to his hat like Medical Excellence Award, B D Kumar Oration, Recognition in the Limca Book of Records, Sujoy B Roy. Interventional Cardiology is his area of expertise and all the awards are for the same. He is known for the treatment like  Angiography Procedure, Pacemaker, Stent Surgery, Bypass Surgery, Mitral Valve Replacement Surgery and Coronary Bypass Surgery. He is also a professional membership of Cardiological Society of India (CSI) and currently practices at Medanta Hospital.

4. Dr. Anil Dhall

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1000

Dr. Anil Dhall is  a senior cardiologist with more than 36 years of experience. He has keen interest in Complex Coronary Interventions, Peripheral Interventions, Carotid Angioplasty  and  Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy. He has been pioneer of preventive cardiology techniques and developing improved processes for STEMI care. He is also an academic contributor, a postdoctoral teacher and examiner in Cardiology and has formulated guidelines on research activities.

5. Dr. Neeraj Kumar

DM (CARDIOLOGY), MD (MEDICINE), MBBS

Consultation fees: ₹1200

Dr. Neeraj has more than 15 years of experience in cardiology & interventional cardiology and currently practices at W Pratiksha Hospital, Gurgaon. He has performed more than 11,000 angiographies and 4000 angioplasties. He has done several fellowships in cardiology and is engaged in the academic training, CMEs and as principal clinical investigator with various national and international organisations.

6. Dr. Madhukar Shahi

DM (Cardiology), DNB (Cardiology), MBBS, MD ( Medicine)

Consultation fees: ₹1000

Dr. Madhukar Shahi is amongst reputed cardiologist , who has 29 years of experience and currently practices at Medanta - Gurgaon. He has a professional membership of CSI,  ESI and CISI. He is known for angiography procedure and valve replacement surgery. He has also performed various vascular surgeries and coronary bypass surgeries.

7. Dr. Manvinder Singh Sachdev

MBBS, Diploma in Paediatrics, MD - Pediatrics, National Board (Paediatric Cardiology)

Consultation fees: ₹800

Dr. Manvinder Singh Sachdev is a renowned pediatric cardiologist and interventionist with 18 years of experience. He has been associated with some of the best hospitals before joining Medanta. His area of specialisation are fetal Cardiology and is currently working in the field of device closure of Perimembranous Ventricular Septal Defect.

8. Dr. Bharat B. Kukreti

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹800-1000

Dr. Bharat B. Kukreti is an experienced cardiologist with 15 years of practice. He handles all kind of cardiac related  problems like heart blockage or increased levels of LDL cholesterol. In  his tenure he has performed over 20000 coronary angiographies, over 5000 angioplasties including peripheral and renal angioplasties, 250 valvuloplasties and 500 pacemakers and ICD implantations. He currently practices at Paras Hospital, Gurgaon.

5 people found this helpful

Heart Transplant - What To Know?

Heart Transplant - What To Know?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

2004 people found this helpful

Heart Transplant - How To Manage Your Life Post Surgery?

Heart Transplant - How To Manage Your Life Post Surgery?

Heart transplant surgery is one of the most critical cardiac surgeries that exists. Since the procedure requires an open-heart surgery, it often takes a long time to complete the operation. General anaesthesia is applied to the patient so that he doesn't feel a thing. The surgeon then connects the patient to the heart-lung bypass machine so that oxygen-rich blood keeps flowing inside the body. The surgeon then separates the chest bone, opens the rib cage, takes out the old heart to replace it with the new one. As soon as the blood flow is restored, the new heart starts functioning (pumps blood). Sometimes an electric shock is required to make the new heart work.

What to expect after the procedure?
The patient is given pain medications and connected to a ventilator. It helps the patient to breath and ejects body fluid. The medications and the fluid in transferred to the body through IV tubes. The patient is kept in an intensive care unit till his condition stabilizes. He might have to spend a couple of weeks to one month in the hospital before he is permitted to go home.

What to expect after the patient is released from the hospital?
The patient is now closely monitored by the transplant team at the outpatient transplant center. Since the intensity and the frequency of the monitoring are frequent, many patients chose to stay close to the hospital. Frequent tests such as regular blood work, echocardiogram, heart biopsies etc. are conducted at regular interval to monitor any signs of the body rejecting the new heart.

What are the long-term adjustments needed?
consumption of immunosuppressants medications would be sacrosanct for the rest of the life. Since the immune system would never fully accept the new organ, immunosuppressant would ensure that the body's antibodies do not attack the new organ. Over time though, as the risk of rejection comes down, the dosage of the immunosuppressant is reduced by the doctor. Since immunosuppressant has some side-effects, a doctor also prescribes certain antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial medications as well.

  • Managing therapies, medications and lifelong health plan: Heart transplant essentially means following a set of lifelong instructions as prescribed by the doctor. Taking medications on time, eating healthy, regular exercise, skipping junk foods, refraining from tobacco and alcohol are some of the instruction a patient might have to abide by for the rest of his life. Meeting the doctor once in a quarter is also important to ensure that any upcoming complications could be addressed proactively.
  • Emotional Support: Often patients feel overwhelmed by the experience of a heart transplant. The stress of the procedure gets to some patients resulting in less sleep, low appetite, lethargy etc. It makes sense to talk to the doctor and seek help for the same.
4636 people found this helpful
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