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Eating Disorders Tips

About Food Cravings!

Whenever we are craving for a particular food, it is not our body but our mind that is craving for that experience.
If we desire for that particular taste then one or two bites are enough to satisfy our taste buds, but we feel that I need to eat this entire dessert in order to satisfy my craving.
So, next time you caught yourself making the wrong choices, remind yourself that my body isn’t craving for this, but my mind wants to experience that emotion which I will experience after having this particular food.

Ask yourself these QUESTIONS

  1. What am I craving for?
  2. How will this particular food make me feel after I consume it?
  3. Which emotion is triggered after consuming this particular food?
  4. Can I relate it to my current state of mind?
  5. Am I not experiencing this particular emotion at this point in my life?

Now realise that you have associated this emotion with that particular food.

This is just the beginning stage to identify the problem. Our cravings are very deep and they demand our attention.

Is there any food which is controlling you? Something you are not able to give up?

7 Diet Hacks To Build Abs

7 Diet Hacks To Build Abs

Who doesn't want a flat stomach? Six pack are the ultimate goal for fitness freaks and fashionistas alike. If only, they were easy to achieve! While most people focus only on exercises to build a six pack, it is impossible to achieve without complementing your exercise plan with a diet plan.

Whether you eat three meals a day or six smaller meals a day, here are a few diet hacks to help you get those abs faster.
  
1) If it comes out of a box, stay away

Cut back on all processed food. Bread, refined sugar, alcohol, processed meats etc should all be replaced with fresh healthy options. If you must have bread, look for multigrain loaves and if you can't drink unsweetened tea, try honey instead of sugar. 

2) Mix your carbs

Carbs are often misunderstood. Having a completely carb free diet is not good for the body, but you should control your carb intake. Plan your weekly diet in such a way that your carbohydrate intake is cycled by alternating between high, moderate and low carbohydrate diet days. It will also help to plan your carb intake around your workout so that the energy produced is used to fuel your exercise. 

3) Eat before going out

Parties are not ideal when you're trying to build abs. It is extremely difficult to refuse the bite sized portions of delicious looking yet unhealthy food that surrounds you. Eating a protein rich meal before heading out will make your stomach full and make it easier to control your indulgences. 

4) Eat slowly

Along with what you eat, the speed at which you eat is also important. Chewing your food not only burns calories but also gives the brain the illusion that you have been eating for long and your stomach is full. Thus the slower you eat, the less you will eat. 

5) Drink water before a meal

Drinking a minimum of 8-10 glasses of water is a must for every diet. Instead of drinking water after a meal, drink a full glass before eating. This fills up your stomach and makes you feel satiated faster. 

6) Pre plan

Carrying your lunch to office is a sure shot way of reducing your calorie intake as compared to eating fast food or grabbing something from the office canteen. Keeping a couple of nuts and protein bars handy can also prevent unhealthy snacking. 

7) Don't shop hungry

If you're in a supermarket and faced with a choice between protein bars and ice cream, it is easier to go for ice cream than protein bar. For this reason, never shop on an empty stomach.

5174 people found this helpful

How Can You Help Your Child Suffering From Eating Disorder?

How Can You Help Your Child Suffering From Eating Disorder?

If your child develops an eating disorder, you might be unsure about how to solve the problem and how to act on it. Eating disorders occur when your child tends to either eat in excess, or eats too less. The behavior of your child is also subjected to change because of an eating disorder. It is likely for him to get withdrawn, rude, and touchy. This makes it difficult for you to deal with them at a time when communication is necessary. Here are some essential tips that you should follow in dealing with eating disorders in children:

  1. You should get advice about how to talk to your child. It will help you in realizing that your child is likely to be defensive as their eating disorder is a form of coping. Hence, it is normal for a child to be reluctant about letting go of it. If your child is undergoing treatment, the treatment team has a vital role to play. However, your constant love and support are also very important.
  2. It is important to talk to your child about the condition, even though he cannot accept that he is having a problem. Communication is an essential part of treatment, which you should never ignore. You should not blame or judge your child, and refer proper resources to him. You have to be prepared for a negative response from your child.
  3. You should educate yourself properly about your eating disorder. Abstain from talking to your child about his appearance, even in the form of a compliment. Use ways for boosting your child’s self-esteem and confidence.
  4. Abstain from referring to weight problems and diets followed by other people. You need to assure your child that you will be there for him, no matter what. You should talk to him about activities he should get involved in, in a positive tone and approach.
  5. Coping with the meal times of your child suffering from an eating disorder is very important as well. Consult your child’s treatment team to know about ways of arranging your meal times ideally.
  6. Take your child out for shopping and agree on having meals that are acceptable, from both your and his end.
  7. You should have an agreement with your whole family regarding meals, which will help to set the expectations of everybody. Agree on not talking about fat content, calorie content, or portion sizes during meals.
  8. You must abstain from consuming low calorie food items in front of them. Try to keep the meal time atmosphere positive and light hearted. Do not focus on others during meal times and teach your child to concentrate on his own meal.
4255 people found this helpful

Leaky Gut & Brain - What Should You Know?

Leaky Gut & Brain - What Should You Know?

You may be surprised to know that the health of your gut influences the health of your brain. The microbial imbalance in your gut is linked to various psychiatric disorders. Leaky gut or intestinal permeability is one of the gut disorders that can cause inflammation in the brain. It has been linked to certain mental disorders like depression.

What is a leaky gut?

It is a digestive condition, in which the intestinal wall is damaged due to your diet, the presence of a protein called zonulin or some medications. All bacteria and toxin waste products leak through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream. This condition triggers the immune system and causes widespread inflammation and allergic reactions like a migraine, eczema, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue, food allergies etc.

Leaky gut and the brain:

Research shows a link between leaky gut and a number of mental disorders, like-

Schizophrenia
Bipolar disorder
• Depression
Anxiety
• Parkinson’s disease
Autism spectrum disorder
• Rett’s syndrome

The ‘leaky’ diet

You can prevent high permeability of your intestines if you manage and plan your diet with the right food

What to eat-

• Leafy vegetables - Spinach, cabbage, asparagus, lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower are high in all the important nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, potassium, folate, folic acid, selenium etc. These enhance the production of neurotransmitters in your brain. They help you to stay away from high anxiety and depression.

• Animal liver and meat - Animal liver is the best for your mental health. Chicken, beef, fish, lamb are high in protein, zinc, potassium and vitamin. Animal liver is the best for your mental health.

• Fermented food - Yoghurt, kimchi, sauerkraut, ginger, fermented cucumbers contain beneficial bacteria that reduce the symptoms of high anxiety and stress.

• Fruit - Pears, apple, apricots, berries and peaches are low glycemic fruits that prevent the growth of harmful bacteria in the gut.

• Whole grains - Ricequinoasorghum, etc. elevate your mood by inducing serotonin release in the brain.

To decrease the risk of gut permeability and to maintain your mental well-being, focus on a healthy diet free of sugar. Remember that a healthy gut will lead to a healthy mind.

4788 people found this helpful

Full Stomach Still Craving For Food - Know The Reasons Of Food Cravings!

Full Stomach Still Craving For Food - Know The Reasons Of Food Cravings!

Full Stomach Still Craving For Food - Know The Reasons Of Food Cravings!

Eating Disorders - How To Resolve It?

Eating Disorders - How To Resolve It?

There is a commonly held view that eating disorders are a lifestyle choice. Eating disorders are actually serious and often fatal illnesses that cause severe disturbances to a person's eating behaviours. Obsessions with food, body weight, and shape may also signal an eating disorder. 

Signs and Symptoms of Common Eating Disorders are discussed below...

Anorexia Nervosa-

People with anorexia nervosa may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, severely restrict the amount of food they eat and eat very small quantities of only certain foods. Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Extremely restricted eating
  • Extreme thinness (emaciation)
  • A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Other symptoms may develop over time, including:

  • Thinning of the bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis)
  • Mild anaemia and muscle wasting and weakness
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Dry and yellowish skin
  • Growth of fine hair all over the body (lanugo)
  • Severe constipation
  • Low blood pressure, slowed breathing and pulse
  • Damage to the structure and function of the heart
  • Brain damage
  • Multiorgan failure
  • Drop in internal body temperature, causing a person to feel cold all the time
  • Lethargy, sluggishness, or feeling tired all the time
  • Infertility

Bulimia Nervosa-

People with bulimia nervosa have recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behaviour that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviours. People with bulimia nervosa usually maintain what is considered a healthy or relatively normal weight.

Symptoms:

  • Chronically inflamed and sore throat
  • Swollen salivary glands in the neck and jaw area
  • Worn tooth enamel and increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth as a result of exposure to stomach acid
  • Acid reflux disorder and other gastrointestinal problems
  • Intestinal distress and irritation from laxative abuse
  • Severe dehydration from purging of fluids
  • Electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium and other minerals) which can lead to stroke or heart attack

Binge-eating Disorder-

People with binge-eating disorder lose control over his or her eating. Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. Binge-eating disorder is the most common eating disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time
  • Eating even when you're full or not hungry
  • Eating fast during binge episodes
  • Eating until you're uncomfortably full
  • Eating alone or in secret to avoid embarrassment
  • Feeling distressed, ashamed, or guilty about your eating
  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

Unspecified Eating Disorder-

  • This happens when the behaviour does not meet the criteria for any food or eating problems but still pose significant threat and problems.
  • This also happens the clinician is not able to assess whether an individual is affected by a certain disorder.

Treatment-

Treatment is available. Recovery is possible...

Eating disorders are serious health conditions that can be both physically and emotionally destructive. People with eating disorders need to seek professional help. Early diagnosis and intervention may enhance recovery. Eating disorders can become chronic, debilitating, and even life-threatening conditions.

When you begin to notice that disordered eating habits are affecting your life, your happiness, and your ability to concentrate, it is important that you talk to somebody about what you are going through.

The most effective and long-lasting treatment for an eating disorder is some form of psychotherapy or psychological counselling, coupled with careful attention to medical and nutritional needs. Ideally, this treatment should be tailored to the individual and will vary according to both the severities of the disorder and the patient's particular problems, needs, and strengths.

2444 people found this helpful

Eating Disorders - How To Cure It?

Eating Disorders - How To Cure It?

There is a commonly held view that eating disorders are a lifestyle problem. Eating disorders are actually serious and often fatal illnesses that cause severe disturbances to a person's eating behaviors. Obsessions with food, body weight, and shape may also signal an eating disorder. 

Signs and Symptoms of Common Eating Disorders are discussed below...

Anorexia Nervosa-

People with anorexia nervosa may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, severely restrict the amount of food they eat, and eat very small quantities of only certain foods. Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Extremely restricted eating
  • Extreme thinness (emaciation)
  • A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Other symptoms may develop over time, including:

  • Thinning of the bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis)
  • Mild anemia and muscle wasting and weakness
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Dry and yellowish skin
  • Growth of fine hair all over the body (lanugo)
  • Severe constipation
  • Low blood pressure, slowed breathing and pulse
  • Damage to the structure and function of the heart
  • Brain damage
  • Multiorgan failure
  • Drop in internal body temperature, causing a person to feel cold all the time
  • Lethargy, sluggishness, or feeling tired all the time
  • Infertility

Bulimia Nervosa-

People with bulimia nervosa have recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behavior that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviors. People with bulimia nervosa usually maintain what is considered a healthy or relatively normal weight.

Symptoms:

  • Chronically inflamed and sore throat
  • Swollen salivary glands in the neck and jaw area
  • Worn tooth enamel and increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth as a result of exposure to stomach acid
  • Acid reflux disorder and other gastrointestinal problems
  • Intestinal distress and irritation from laxative abuse
  • Severe dehydration from purging of fluids
  • Electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium and other minerals) which can lead to stroke or heart attack

Binge-eating Disorder-

People with binge-eating disorder lose control over his or her eating. Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. Binge-eating disorder is the most common eating disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time
  • Eating even when you're full or not hungry
  • Eating fast during binge episodes
  • Eating until you're uncomfortably full
  • Eating alone or in secret to avoid embarrassment
  • Feeling distressed, ashamed, or guilty about your eating
  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

Unspecified Eating Disorder-

  • This happens when the behavior do not meet the criteria for any food or eating problems but still pose significant threat and problems.
  • This also happens the clinician is not able to assess whether an individual is affected by a certain disorder.

Treatment-

Treatment is available. Recovery is possible...

Eating disorders are serious health conditions that can be both physically and emotionally destructive. People with eating disorders need to seek professional help. Early diagnosis and intervention may enhance recovery. Eating disorders can become chronic, debilitating, and even life-threatening.

When you begin to notice that disordered eating habits are affecting your life, your happiness, and your ability to concentrate; it is important that you talk to somebody about what you are going through.

The most effective and long-lasting treatment for an eating disorder is some form of psychotherapy or psychological counseling, coupled with careful attention to medical and nutritional needs. Ideally, this treatment varies according to both the severities of the disorder and the patient's particular problems, needs, and strengths.

4593 people found this helpful

Eating Disorder - Orthorexia!

Eating Disorder - Orthorexia!

Eating Disorder - Orthorexia!

1 person found this helpful

Eating Disorders - How To Tackle It?

Eating Disorders - How To Tackle It?

There is a commonly held view that eating disorders are a lifestyle choice. Eating disorders are actually serious and often fatal illnesses that cause severe disturbances to a person's eating behaviours. Obsessions with food, body weight, and shape may also signal an eating disorder. 

Signs and Symptoms of Common Eating Disorders are discussed below...

Anorexia Nervosa-

People with anorexia nervosa may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, severely restrict the amount of food they eat and eat very small quantities of only certain foods. Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Extremely restricted eating
  • Extreme thinness (emaciation)
  • A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Other symptoms may develop over time, including:

  • Thinning of the bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis)
  • Mild anemia and muscle wasting and weakness
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Dry and yellowish skin
  • Growth of fine hair all over the body (lanugo)
  • Severe constipation
  • Low blood pressure, slowed breathing and pulse
  • Damage to the structure and function of the heart
  • Brain damage
  • Multiorgan failure
  • Drop in internal body temperature, causing a person to feel cold all the time
  • Lethargy, sluggishness, or feeling tired all the time
  • Infertility

Bulimia Nervosa-

People with bulimia nervosa have recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behaviour that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviours. People with bulimia nervosa usually maintain what is considered a healthy or relatively normal weight.

Symptoms:

  • Chronically inflamed and sore throat
  • Swollen salivary glands in the neck and jaw area
  • Worn tooth enamel and increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth as a result of exposure to stomach acid
  • Acid reflux disorder and other gastrointestinal problems
  • Intestinal distress and irritation from laxative abuse
  • Severe dehydration from purging of fluids
  • Electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium and other minerals) which can lead to stroke or heart attack

Binge-eating Disorder-

People with binge-eating disorder lose control over his or her eating. Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. Binge-eating disorder is the most common eating disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time
  • Eating even when you're full or not hungry
  • Eating fast during binge episodes
  • Eating until you're uncomfortably full
  • Eating alone or in secret to avoid embarrassment
  • Feeling distressed, ashamed, or guilty about your eating
  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

Unspecified Eating Disorder-

  • This happens when the behaviour does not meet the criteria for any food or eating problems but still pose significant threat and problems.
  • This also happens the clinician is not able to assess whether an individual is affected by a certain disorder.

Treatment-

Treatment is available. Recovery is possible...

Eating disorders are serious health conditions that can be both physically and emotionally destructive. People with eating disorders need to seek professional help. Early diagnosis and intervention may enhance recovery. Eating disorders can become chronic, debilitating, and even life-threatening conditions.

When you begin to notice that disordered eating habits are affecting your life, your happiness, and your ability to concentrate, it is important that you talk to somebody about what you are going through.

The most effective and long-lasting treatment for an eating disorder is some form of psychotherapy or psychological counselling, coupled with careful attention to medical and nutritional needs. Ideally, this treatment should be tailored to the individual and will vary according to both the severities of the disorder and the patient's particular problems, needs, and strengths.

Obesity - Do Eating Disorders Lead To It?

Obesity - Do Eating Disorders Lead To It?

Obesity is a serious, chronic disease that can have a negative effect on many systems in your body. People who are overweight or obese have a much greater risk of developing serious conditions, including:

The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically over the past few decades, and obesity during adolescence is associated with significant medical morbidity during adulthood. Eating disorders and obesity are usually seen as very different problems but actually share many similarities. Eating disorders (EDs) are the third most common chronic condition in adolescents, after obesity and asthma.

In fact, eating disorders, obesity, and other weight-related disorders may overlap as girls move from one problem, such as unhealthy dieting, to another, such as obesity. Understand the links between eating disorders and obesity and promote healthy attitudes and behaviors related to weight and eating.

What is an Eating Disorder?

Eating Disorders describe illnesses that are characterized by irregular eating habits and severe distress or concern about body weight or shape. Eating disturbances may include inadequate or excessive food intake which can ultimately damage an individual’s well-being. The most common forms of eating disorders include Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder and affect both females and males.

Signs & Symptoms of an Eating Disorder:

A man or woman suffering from an eating disorder may reveal several signs and symptoms, some which are:

  1. Chronic dieting despite being hazardously underweight
  2. Constant weight fluctuations
  3. Obsession with calories and fat contents of food
  4. Engaging in ritualistic eating patterns, such as cutting food into tiny pieces, eating alone, and/or hiding food
  5. Continued fixation with food, recipes, or cooking; the individual may cook intricate meals for others but refrain from partaking
  6. Depression or lethargic stage
  7. Avoidance of social functions, family and friends. May become isolated and withdrawn
  8. Switching between periods of overeating and fasting

What are the health risks associated with these disorders?

  1. Stunted growth.
  2. Delayed menstruation.
  3. Damage to vital organs such as the heart and brain.
  4. Nutritional deficiencies, including starvation.
  5. Cardiac arrest.
  6. Emotional problems such as depression and anxiety.

What is Obesity?

Obesity means being overweight by the accumulation of excess fat within the body. Obesity is defined to some extent by measuring Body Mass Index (BMI). People become obese by consumption of excess calories, imbalance between calories intake and calories outgoing, leading a sedentary life, lack of sleep , disturbances in lipid metabolism and intake of medications that put on obese.

What are the risks associated with obesity?

Obesity increases the risk for:

  1. High blood pressure
  2. Stroke
  3. Cardiovascular disease
  4. Gallbladder disease
  5. Diabetes
  6. Respiratory problems
  7. Arthritis
  8. Cancer
  9. Emotional problems such as depression and anxiety

How eating disorder and obesity are related?

Eating disorders and obesity are part of a range of weight-related problems.

  1. Body dissatisfaction and unhealthy dieting practices are linked to the development of eating disorders, obesity, and other problems.
  2. Binge eating is common among people with eating disorders and people who are obese.
  3. Depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders are associated with both eating disorders and obesity.
  4. The environment may contribute to both eating disorders and obesity.

Help adolescents develop healthy eating habits:

  • Help children learn to control their own eating.
  • Offer children a variety of healthy foods at meal and snack times.
  • Eat dinner together as a family most days of the week.
  • Be aware of your child's emotional health or else consult a psychologist
  • Encourage children to participate in sports, dance, swimming and other physical activities.
  • Counteract harmful media messages about body image. 

The splendid approach:

The approach should be quite simple. A proper diet plan, nutritious foods and fruits with proper exercise can do a world of good to you.

3267 people found this helpful
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